Logitech G413 keyboard offers mechanical switches on a budget

Using a membrane keyboard is like the PC Master Race's version of playing with a janky third-party bargain-bin console gamepad. Logitech's G413 mechanical gaming keyboard is designed to make the transition from rubber domes to mechanical switches a little less expensive than usual. The G413 packs the same Logitech-exclusive Romer-G switches as the company's much pricier G Pro and Orion keyboards, but foregoes its bigger brothers' RGB LED backlighting.

The G413 appears to be stripped of extraneous features and aimed at gamers looking for the precision of mechanical key switches in a compact package with few frills, much like HyperX's Alloy FPS keyboard. Logitech even throws in an extra set of keycaps with a unique look and texture, like HyperX did with the Alloy FPS. The key (ba-dum-ching) difference here is the use of Logitech's in-house Romer-G switches, which the company says offer 70-million-keypress durability and 25% faster actuation than competing designs. The Romer-G switches have the same 45 g actuation force as Cherry MX Reds, but their 3-mm travel distance is shorter than the Cherry switches' typical 4-mm travel.

The Logitech G413 has an anodized aluminum top plate available in two different colors, and an integrated USB 2.0 pass-through port for use with a mouse or other peripherals. The keyboard measures 17.5" x 5.1" x 1.4" (45 cm x 13 cm x 3.4 cm) and weighs in at 2.4 lbs. (1.1 kg). Users can program macros to the F1-F12 keys using the included Logitech Gaming Software. Of course, the G413 has all the requisite gamer specs like N-key rollover, anti-ghosting, and the ability to disable the Windows key.

Logitech offers the G413 in two versions. The G413 Carbon has a black body and switches with red LED illumination, while the G413 Silver has the same black key caps with a silver top plate and white backlighting. The Silver model will be offered exclusively at Best Buy, though it also appears in Logitech's online store. Both versions share the same $90 asking price.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    So Logitech manufacturs it’s own mechanical switches to save money, calls it a “budget keyboard” and then charges as much, if not more, than the competition using genuine Cherry MX switches.

    Shame on you, Logitech.

    • thedosbox
    • 3 years ago

    Hmm. I tried and shelved a Cherry MX Brown keyboard as I couldn’t stand the noise (even after fitting rubber O-rings), but that silver one is tempting me to try again. It seems the Romer-G switches are a tad quieter? Has anyone used one?

      • blahsaysblah
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, the market is small because of noise issue, not because of price.

        • thedosbox
        • 3 years ago

        Did you mean to reply to me or someone else? I don’t particularly care about the price, and am more interested in how these are to use.

        Judging from the videos I’ve seen it does seem to have a different noise profile (less “clack” and a more prominent “thud”) compared to a Cherry Brown board.

          • BurntMyBacon
          • 3 years ago

          I think he was pointing out that your issue with noise is common and a bigger deterrent to adoption than the price. I personally still think price is the biggest hindrance given the proliferation of $15 keyboards in both business and OEM consumer PCs, but noise is definitely a deterrent.

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      I have the Orion Spark. Subjectively, it is quieter than my Black Widow Ultimate Stealth (which uses razor orange switches). Subjectively, the razor orange switches are quieter than the Cherry MX Brown switches. All of these are still louder than the rubber dome keys.

      How much louder depends on how you type with it. With rubber dome switches, you bottom out the key each key press. Given that the bottom is the only noise generating point in the motion of a rubber dome key, and the fact that the noise is dampened by the rubber dome itself, it is hard to get a mechanical keyboard that can compete for quietness. Linear mechanical switches with O-Rings may get you close, but not equal. O-Rings also tend to make the keys feel mushier (like rubber dome) which defeats the purpose for some. Tactile switches generate noise at both the switch point and the bottom. Lighter tactile switches generate less noise at the switch point, but there is little you can do to eliminate it.

      On the other hand, tactile switches present an opportunity. Unlike rubber dome switches, you don’t have to bottom out to register a key click. While this is also true of linear switches, linear switches provide no feedback to tell you when the key stroke has registered. Light tactile switches give you physical (and auditory unfortunately) feedback that, with practice, can allow you to stop you key press short of bottoming out. Then the only noise source is the switching point. At that point, it is up to you to decide whether it is quiet enough.

      A side benefit is that stopping short of bottoming out means you spend (marginally) less time reversing your key press which in turn allows for (marginally) quicker response in games. Unfortunately, in my estimation, 99% of mechanical keyboard users bottom out exactly as they do with rubber dome keyboards. This negates the majority of the benefit afford by mechanical switches.

      [i<]Note: 99% of all statistics are made up ... including this one[/i<]

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    $90 ain’t budget to me. But these are…

    [url<]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DBJTZU2/&tag=dealzon-20[/url<] [url<]https://www.amazon.com/TOMOKO-Mechanical-Keyboard-Switches-Anti-Ghosting/dp/B01MSPUNOW/ref=dp_ob_title_ce[/url<]

      • POLAR
      • 3 years ago

      So the Tomoko has an anti-ghosting huh?
      I guess the Motoko is the variant with ghosting then.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 3 years ago

    That’s it, keep those pricing moving downward. I’d love to see mechanical keyboards return to being the norm again with competitive prices for super cheap knock offs at 20$.

      • Flying Fox
      • 3 years ago

      I bought a super cheap knock off at 40-something. I think that is already quite reasonable if you are newbie into the world of mechanical keyboards.

      • LostCat
      • 3 years ago

      There’s a Zalman one out for 50.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Monoprice has a few for under $40.

        • Anovoca
        • 3 years ago

        Typing on one right meow. Really not sure in what world $90 is a budget price for a keyboard.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Logitech G413 keyboard offers mechanical switches on a budget[/quote<] Interesting, I'm listening! [quote<]....$90 asking price[/quote<] So the same price as all the other Cherry MX keyboards with similar standard layouts..... Great job Logitech.

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      [quote=”DPete27″<]Interesting, I'm listening![/quote<] I don't think they were counting on that.

      • pranav0091
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]on a budget[/quote<] [quote<]Wayne...[/quote<] Holy Batman, its so cheap...

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