Intel document confirms that Xeons will come in Gold and Platinum

Rumors have circulated that Intel's next round of Xeons will shed their rather nondescript "E3" and "E5" model prefixes in favor of names based on luxurious precious metals. A document on Intel's website has confirmed that at least some upcoming chips will be branded as Xeon Gold and Xeon Platinum.

The document is intended to inform customers of subtle changes to the way that markings will be inscribed on integrated heat spreaders, but it also includes a list of model numbers of as-of-yet unreleased processors. The table lists 20 different Xeon Gold 6100-series processors are listed, with clock speeds ranging from 2.0 to 3.6 GHz. Another 14 Xeon Platinum 8100-series chips are listed with the same frequency range.

Core counts are not given, but according to Anandtech, the Xeon Gold chips will work in dual-socket motherboards, while Xeon Platinum processors can be used in four-socket systems. The rumor mongers at WCCFTech are reporting that the new Xeons will be available with as many as 28 cores per socket. We tried searching for some of the product codes in the list but we didn't find any useful additional details.

Comments closed
    • ptsant
    • 3 years ago

    The highest frequency is 3.6GHz. Makes my 8c Ryzen look not that bad. Now I need to test ECC support…

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I feel almost certain AMD will counter this by using names of precious gems in their branding scheme.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Gold and platinum. Am I the only one who finds this branding scheme a bit unimaginative and corny?

      • Klimax
      • 3 years ago

      That’s the least of its problems.

    • CuttinHobo
    • 3 years ago

    Highest level Xeon: Xeon Bling. I can’t wait!

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 3 years ago

    Oh I know, AMD should retaliate with:

    1) wood
    2) stone
    3) iron
    4) diamond

    Total winner’s move right there.

    • helix
    • 3 years ago

    <sarcasm>Because motivating to management why we need platinum processors and not just gold processors makes so much sense.</sarcasm>

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Perhaps coincidentally since the document was technically posted on Tuesday, but Intel is announcing its Q1 earnings today.

    The earnings announcements aren’t product launches, but sometimes the CEO or another executive at least divulges a little bit of interesting information about upcoming products.

    Edit: And they’re out: [url<]https://s21.q4cdn.com/600692695/files/doc_financials/2017/Earnings-Release-Q1-2017_Final.pdf[/url<] 14.8 Billion in revenue (seems to be inline with expectations) 3.6 Billion in profits (also inline with expectations) More importantly: Intel is increasing its revenue and EPS projections for 2017.

    • Bobs_Your_Uncle
    • 3 years ago

    So I want to know which Xeons are going to feature 1.8 bajillion RGB-LED user selectable color effects??? Those are the ones I’m waiting for, cuz RGB-LEDs = ultra-radical top-of-the-line performance!

    Who needs incomprehensible performance specs when you have handy color charts (and cool effects capabilities, like breathing, strobe, wave, etc.) to guide your next server room upgrade …

    (MOAR colors = MOAR better = MOAR $$$)

      • Thresher
      • 3 years ago

      Intel Xeon Gold – Meh
      Intel Xeon Platinum – Cool
      Intel Xeon OPAL LED VERSION – OMGWTFBBQ

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    This is all a move to make the product-line make more sense to PHB-types who are typically the ones who have approve the budget for upgrades.

    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    I’m holding out for the Fatal1ty Titanium edition.

    • nico1982
    • 3 years ago

    Meh, I’ll wait for Piano Black or Frosted Red, whichever comes out first.

    • blastdoor
    • 3 years ago

    I see what Intel is doing here.

    If they just came out with a straightforward naming convention in which all the numbers and letters had some obvious, inherent meaning, people would criticize it for being boring. “Sure, we know what these names mean, but where’s the mystery — the intrigue?”

    But by spending a couple of decades creating increasingly incomprehensible product names, Intel is preparing us to be blown away by something that is boring but understandable.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    This just goes to show you how much AMD has already won.

    When AMD wants to tell you that Vega is named Vega, you darn well bet that Raj is going to get all Capsaiciny on stage in front of a (hopefully well liquored-up) journalist audience and do a strip tease to boot!

    Those losers at Intel? They can’t even be bothered to put the exciting Xeon models at the top of the PDF document on some obscure website that nobody reads!

    • jts888
    • 3 years ago

    Without pricing, TDPs, or even core counts, this information still seems a bit thin.
    Is there some brinkmanship here with AMD’s Naples to try to get the other side to commit first?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      I’m pretty sure AMD already knows everything it needs to know about Skylake EP.

      That’s because the chip has already launched and is already being used in production systems right now.

      Oh, it’s not available for standard retail sale from Dell or at Newegg or something like that. However, Intel has already shipped 32 core Skylake EP models (that aren’t even in this particular product lineup) to major cloud customers like Google.

      ServeTheHome had an interesting take on the matter: It’s kind of like a reverse paper launch. Intel has shipped plenty of these chips already, but they are just now getting around to back-handedly announcing products halfway down an information sheet that nobody other than OEM reps would normally read.

        • jts888
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, I already read STH’s take on it.

        I was aware that the new flagship Skylake was 32c, but where are you seeing that it’s being sold uncut in EP (or mere “Gold”?) form and not EX/Platinum?

          • the
          • 3 years ago

          The major cloud providers (Amazon, MS Azure, Google) have standardized around dual socket nodes. They tend to have the best price/performance and good enough RAS feature set for production deployment. Amazon and Azure offer high core count nodes that would require >4 sockets but they are a minority and typically paired with large amounts of memory (inversely if you want lots of memory, you maybe forced into a larger socket system).

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 years ago

            On AWS, those are the x1 boxes: 4 sockets, 16 cores per socket, 32G of RAM per core. Sadly they won’t offer them in slices less than two whole sockets. Usually they’ll let you rent in any power-of-2 number of cores, but not on these.

            Other types of recent AWS machines offer 16G, 8G or 4G of RAM per core in sizes of 1-32 cores.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      The key take away is that Intel is innovating their existing product naming scheme by making it even more confusing.

        • jts888
        • 3 years ago

        It’s going to feel downright weird in comparison with Naples only sells in 32c and 24c variants (maybe also a weird 4-die/8-channel 16c as well) at a few clock speeds each.

        I mean I guess we might see a 2P*(12c/16c) platform too for marginally higher clocks at the cost of an additional interconnect bottleneck, but I’m really not expecting that.

          • the
          • 3 years ago

          AMD will win back some market share in the server space because well, they’re effectively at zero right now. The only direction they can go is up!

          However, I don’t seem them being a big threat to Intel’s bottom right right now. While Intel has successfully been fleecing businesses by increasing prices, the Purley platform does merit some of the premium, especially in the context of processors with extra on-die facilities. FPGAs, Omnipath and Nervana deep learning technology are likely going to be worth the price of admission for the niches they serve.

          The vanilla Purley platform is going to be a tougher sell, especially if AMD wages a price war. A 28 core Sky Lake-EP vs. 32 core Naples chips at the same clock speed is going to be tough for Intel to win in performance. Intel will also support less memory in the Gold lineup (the Platinum series [i<]might[/i<] support memory buffers which would double or triple capacity per socket). Then there is still the successor to Xeon D which should also be arriving this year. That will be a very interesting competitor to Naples depending on how many cores, clocks and watts they take. Underclocking/volting of Ryzen has hinted that AMD could be very competitive in this space

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 years ago

            I wonder what effect the big cloud players will have here. They seem to buy global-scale quantities of the same SKU, and I’m going to guess they are quite risk adverse. They are open to high level of customization. They don’t know exactly what workload might be put on the servers. They are somewhat sensitive to how attractive the platform sounds to prospective renters, but also the price per hour will be a sales point, and the renters can easily swap instance types if something is not up to standards, so the renters themselves are probably not risk adverse at all.

            I note that Xeon D has not surfaced on AWS.

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            Well some one is buying lots of Xeon D. It is an entirely new platform vs. the rest of the Xeon lineup. It costs tens of millions to bring a chip to market (Intel saves on core development here since they’re just copy/paste existing logic blocks). Google would be my first bet followed by Facebook then Microsoft. These companies (and even Amazon outside of AWS) have tons of systems that are not used for cloud hosting.

            I’m also curious where the Xeon D line is going to go from here. Will it use the big Sky Lake-EP core with AVX-512 or will use the more consumer focused core? L3 cache sizes are also configurable so it could site between the big and little Sky Lake designs.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 years ago

            I imagine that the AVX-512 hardware is going to be mildly counterproductive for a whole lot of things servers do, not so much number crunching going on when handling transactions and shuffling around data segments. I gather that Xeon D is a meaty yet efficient single socket product but I’m not clear how many silicon changes there are compared to the regular meaty dual socket products. More of a SOC, but otherwise not much to talk about?

            Seems to me that Intel can afford, and should pursue, a strategy of higher- and lower-efficiency cores which can then each be deployed from top to bottom of the range. They have a certain number of servers and desktops that crunch numbers, give them AVX-512 are small optimizations aimed at performance. They have a certain number of servers and laptops that prioritize efficiency, for them take a core that doesn’t have AVX-512 hardware and make refinements for efficiency.

            Otherwise they risk that AMD chooses the efficient route while they choose highest performance, or that IBM for example goes for highest performance while they go efficient. Probably takes a pretty small edge to cause someone buying global-scale quantities to switch platforms.

    • POLAR
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_Gold_and_Silver[/url<] [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_Platinum[/url<]

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      Xeon Platinum 8180: I CHOOSE YOU!

        • the
        • 3 years ago

        Xeon Phi is SUPPER EFFECTIVE.

          • chuckula
          • 3 years ago

          I KNEW IT WASN’T JUST FOR BREAKFAST ANYMORE!

            • the
            • 3 years ago

            XEON CHOCOLATE M: MELTS IN YOUR MOUTH, NOT IN YOUR DATACENTER

    • NTMBK
    • 3 years ago

    Perfect naming to win contracts from a Trump government.

      • lmc5b
      • 3 years ago

      Not everyone here is american, so if you could keep your politics somewhere else.

        • NTMBK
        • 3 years ago

        That idiot is a disaster for the whole world…

    • bhtooefr
    • 3 years ago

    Wouldn’t that be E5 and E7, not E3 and E5?

    E3 is the single-socket LGA1151 SKUs. (So, maybe they’ll become Silver?)

      • Waco
      • 3 years ago

      Pretty sure that’s right.

      I prefer the older naming scheme. It made more sense.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      The E3 lineup could make up the bronze with the successor to the Xeon D carrying the silver name.

      There is also the Avonton chips that could also be rebranded into bronze or copper.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    See now some people are complaining about Gold & Platinum being so expensive.

    However, as you can see [url=http://www.therichest.com/luxury/most-expensive/the-15-most-expensive-materials-in-the-world/<]here[/url<] if they really wanted to go after high-end materials they would have named the models Californium & Antimatter.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      With those price unobtainium would be more appropriate.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        Oops… Didn’t even bother to check your comment before I posted mine.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Why not go all the way up to 11 and call them Unobtanium?

    • ImSpartacus
    • 3 years ago

    All that gold and platinum? What a H0.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      Treat your H0 right or it will be stepping out on you.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This