Galax and KFA2 induct the GTX 1080 Ti into the Hall of Fame

Nvidia's GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is a standout performer. For some, the outrageous performance must be accompanied by ludicrous styling and over-the-top features. The Galax/KFA2 GeForce GTX 1080 Ti HOF was obviously created to cater to that market segment. The card sports a built-in LCD display that shows the frequency of the graphics core and memory or custom text by way of the company's Xtreme Tuner Plus Software.

The 1080 Ti HOF's two-and-a-half slot cooler is embossed with a crown design befitting the current single-card performance champion. The crown design and the three 8-pin PCIe power connectors are backlit with RGB LEDs. Sadly, the LCD display's backlight appears to be limited to a single bluish-white color.

The card's core base clock is 1569 MHz, up 89 MHz from the reference spec. The specified boost clock is 94 MHz higher than the Founder Edition, at 1683 MHz. The memory is the GTX 1080 Ti standard-issue 11 GB of 11 GT/s GDDR5X on a 352-bit bus.

Those who repeatedly plug and unplug monitors in a darkened environment will appreciate the lights built into the card's I/O bracket. The card augments the standard GeForce GTX 1080 Ti port configuration of three DisplayPorts and an HDMI 2.0 jack with a DVI-D connector, perfect for connecting that 19" TN display from 2005. The backplate also appears to sport a button. Galax didn't say what the button does, but we imagine it resets the graphics card's clock speeds back to the factory specifications.

The card's product page lists compatibility with Windows 7-10, Linux, and FreeBSD, though we aren't sure if software exists for control of the built-in LCDs in the open-source operating systems.

Galax did not provide pricing or availability information for the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti HOF. Based on past experience, readers in North America will have to search pretty hard to be able to get their claws on one of these. In addition to an unspecified amount of money, prospective buyers will need a power supply with three 8-pin PCIe power connectors and a case capable of swallowing the card's bulky 12.9" x 6.0" x 2.2" (33 cm x 15 cm x 5.7 cm) dimensions.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Not enough PCIe 8-pin sockets on that board, IMO.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    DVI-D in 2017 for a gaming card? Why? If you’re going to include outdated ports I’d prefer a Joystick port, because that tech aged well.

      • UnknownZA
      • 2 years ago

      I for one am glad about the DVI-D port. I have an ASUS 144Hz monitor and both display port and HDMI failed after about six months of use while the DVI-D port works fine. After the display port failed I wanted Amazon to replace it but to sit without a monitor for some weeks as I don’t stay in the US would have been hard to swallow. Also HDMI only supports 60Hz so that port didn’t help and then it failed too then I learnt the DVI-D works at 144Hz and have been using that for a year and a half now. Wish more manufacturers would implement it into the 1080 Ti since I noticed most don’t have it.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 2 years ago

      what do you mean the whole world isn’t America in 2017!?

      • brucethemoose
      • 2 years ago

      Some of us still have Korean OC monitors.

      Running at 2560×1440 @110hz over DVI here. Don’t plan on trashing it anytime soon, as I still can’t get anything much better for $400.

    • Redocbew
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder how many people buying this card will even be keeping the stock cooler. Most will probably be tossing it in favor of a waterblock or an LN2 setup anyway.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 2 years ago

      Oh god, I didn’t even think about that. How sad…

      • ch┬Áck
      • 2 years ago

      Wouldn’t someone opt for a cheaper, less flashy 1080 Ti instead? You know, since this probably charges a premium over stock models.

        • Redocbew
        • 2 years ago

        I’m sure it will be, but this is clearly not your average factory overclocked card. I’m thinking the reason why someone would buy this is really for the PCB rather than the cooler. I think it was the 980Ti from Galax that also had a stupidly over the top power setup which would be completely pointless otherwise.

          • cynan
          • 2 years ago

          Over the top power delivery? Obviously the extra 8-pin power connector is required to power the LCD screen.

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    Issues of styling aside, making the underlying heatsink appreciably larger is an interesting idea. For a single-GPU system it probably has space to spare, so I would be curious to see how well the cooler performs.

    • invinciblegod
    • 2 years ago

    “Ludicrous styling”

    Yes if you believe that a $2 lcd character display made for arduinos is somehow the pinnacle of styling. Even aside from that, the gray color scheme just looks boring.

      • Kougar
      • 2 years ago

      You might want to recheck the definition of ludicrous.

      • Farting Bob
      • 2 years ago

      Its not even RGB!

    • Anovoca
    • 2 years ago

    Close, but I feel like they should gold have plated the aluminum heat spreaders and i/o bracket. This just looks too flat.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 2 years ago

    My eyes, they burn!!!

    On the page it describes it as being “Elegant and Classy”–for who, the Kardashians?

    Also feeling pretty nauseous right now–you could have shown a little self-restraint and spared us this Wayne; oh the humanity!

    • ImSpartacus
    • 2 years ago

    Six inches tall?!

    Wow, that might be the tallest card I’ve ever seen.

    This last generation has seen cards grow in that dimension target than length.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Must…..resist……comments……..Mind……in…….gutter……

        • Bomber
        • 2 years ago

        I got your back…

        That’s what she said!

      • Blink
      • 2 years ago

      2.2″ tall. L x W x H.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    Totally should not have been voted in!
    It didn’t even make the all star game!

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    One might have trouble deciding between this high end graphics card or an entry level automobile.

      • CuttinHobo
      • 2 years ago

      “Dong? Where is my automobile?”

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