Intel DC P4600 and P4500 SSDs give datacenters a little TLC

Intel's Optane devices made their entrance into consumer and datacenter markets this spring, but don't think for a second that the company is neglecting its other lineups of memory products. Not only is Intel expanding its production of 3D TLC NAND, it's also releasing two new lines of datacenter solid-state drives: the DC P4500 and DC P4600 series.

Between the P4500 series and P4600 series, Intel is releasing a total of six new drives. All the models pack Intel's TLC NAND and an all-new controller developed internally. As expected of datacenter drives, these SSDs use PCI express connectivity and the NVMe protocol. All models will be available as half-height, half-length add-in cards, and some higher-capacity variants be offered as U.2 2.5" drives.

The drives in the P4600 series are the most powerful of the bunch, particularly when it comes to write speeds. According to Intel, the highest-capacity 4TB model provides sequential read speeds up to 3270 MB/s, while sequential writes can go as far as 2100 MB/s. For random operations, the P4600 drives can reach 694K IOPS on reads and are capable of 228K IOPS when writing. Available capacities are 1.6TB, 2TB, and 4TB.

As for the P4500 series, Intel reports that the drives provide read performance on par with their P4600 brethren. The 4TB P4500 drive, for example, posts sequential read speeds up to 3270 MB/s and random read speeds up to 687K IOPS. The drives fall behind the higher-end models when it comes to writes, however, offering sequential writes up to 1860 MB/s and random writes up to 62K IOPS. The P4500 series drives will be available with 1 TB, 2 TB, or 4TB of storage space.

Intel plans a second quarter launch for all of these drives, so we'd expect them to hit the shelves sooner than later. The company hasn't announced pricing, though it noted that will offer five-year warranty coverage.

Comments closed
    • Wirko
    • 3 years ago

    TLC? Hmmm, I’ve heard this acronym before. Tough luck?

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      [url=https://youtu.be/XmH4_pr6mH0<]TLC[/url<]. So very, very early 90s.

      • Flying Fox
      • 3 years ago

      I know “3D” is the new fad and all, but together with TLC how much worse are we looking in terms of performance and endurance?

    • tsk
    • 3 years ago

    So these drives are close to capping out PCIe 3.0 x4(3940MB/s).
    Will we see PCIe 4.0 anytime soon?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      The spec will hopefully be approved this year.

      There have already been demonstrations of almost-final PCIe 4.0 devices from outfits like Mellanox, but it always takes time to go from a spec being ratified to having widespread support, especially in consumer devices.

        • tsk
        • 3 years ago

        I thought it would come out soner when it was announced in 2011.
        Maybe CCIX will be used instead? Is that viable for consumer products, it seems to be compatible with PCIe.

          • chuckula
          • 3 years ago

          It’s taking forever since PCIe is a huge consortium with a giant bureaucracy.

          There are other proposed standards out there, and it’s real easy for a company or a small group of companies to hork something out without going through umpteen committees.

          But then again, it’s also not easy to have one of those quick-n-dirty standards get adopted like PCIe is.

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      Or they could dust off the mostly-mythical x8 form factor, and buy some time by doubling per-slot bandwidth that way. Of course, you also halve the number of slots you can have, but server platforms generally offer more I/O. Intel already has all the pieces, and PCIe x8 is already part of the standard, so without any pesky 3rd party involvement they could easily roll out x8 SSDs and x8-sporting server motherboards to match. And I’m sure AMD is hoping they do, because Naples looks like the small server platform that has the most to gain by creating a demand for more PCIe lanes.

        • jts888
        • 3 years ago

        Everybody in the SSD industry wants the AIC format to die though.

        m.2 is cheaper to produce for consumer-grade systems, and u.2 drives allow for higher drive counts in a rackmount server. (Supermicro sells 2U systems with [i<]48[/i<] u.2 drives and presumably a healthy amount of PLX PCIe switches.)

          • tsk
          • 3 years ago

          That makes sense, I love my little M.2 gumstick at the back of my ITX motherboard, no cables or anything.

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