Three flavors of Linux are coming to Windows Store

One of the highlights of Microsoft's Build conference last year was the announcement of an Ubuntu-based Linux subsystem for Windows 10. The company's recent announcement of Windows 10 S and its Store-bound app installation left many wondering if the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) would be present in the new version of the operating system. Microsoft yesterday cleared that right up and announced that WSL installations based on Fedora, SuSE, and Ubuntu will all offered in the Windows Store.

Microsoft is pitching Windows S as a competitor for Chromebooks in the education sector. Computer science and other technology-related programs in universities around the globe usually make varying use of Linux as part of their curricula. Chromebooks offer limited Linux command-line capabilities through a built-in terminal application, and whole-hog Linux VMs are relatively easy to install using tools like Crouton. As a university student, I used a Chromebook with Crouton almost exclusively.

The ability to download WSL distributions through the Windows Store should be a bit less complicated than the current method. Users will be able to install one, two, or all three Linux distributions as needed. Up to this point, Ubuntu was the only option. Users will also get the ability to install the WSL distributions to drives other than the primary system drive.

The availability and continued support of WSL in Windows 10 S bolsters that operating system's credentials for use in education settings. Microsoft promises that educational buyers who have a need for the capabilities of a full-fat Windows installation will be able to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro for no charge. Other Windows 10 S system owners must pay $50 for the same upgrade. It appears that links, w3c, and other text-mode browsers might end up easier to install on Windows 10 S than Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

Comments closed
    • Wonders
    • 2 years ago

    [quote=”Wayniac Mansion”<]curricula[/quote<] A sub-continent chuckula.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      I prefer an archipelago.

        • DrDominodog51
        • 2 years ago

        A gulag archipelago perhaps?

    • Krogoth
    • 2 years ago

    [url<]https://youtu.be/CpFdP5yATw0[/url<]

    • adamlongwalker
    • 2 years ago

    Windows 10S is a closed system. You can only get programs from their store.

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlWwIBwExaI[/url<]

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      Good thing these are in the store then.

      • VincentHanna
      • 2 years ago

      Who cares what MSFT does to their RT arm?

      Use Pro.

    • Shambles
    • 2 years ago

    Awesome. Now I can use Linux without having to worry about not being infected by malware or having some sense of privacy.

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      lol

      • BIF
      • 2 years ago

      That’s called a “feature”. 😉

      • lycium
      • 2 years ago

      Exactly this. It’s really great that there’s basically a full Linux in there now, but damnit what I most want from Linux is the damn Windows Update and telemetry shenanigans gone!

      If we could have stayed at Windows 7, I would gladly stay with Microsoft indefinitely. As it is now, just Update and the nonstop telemetry / background crap is pushing me out to Linux.

    • ptsant
    • 2 years ago

    And thus the linux desktop is swallowed by Windows.

      • cheesyking
      • 2 years ago

      nah, I reckon next year MS will be announcing Windows is switching to vanilla Gnome3.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 2 years ago

    Wait, what?! Did I hear that right?

    Over 15 years ago during my academic years, if some said Microsoft was going allow the sale of Linux in one of it nearby stores people would have sent you to the nearest psych ward.

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      No. The Windows Store is a software component built into Windows 10 (and 8.)

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      lol

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Honestly no, you didn’t hear any of that right. Reread the article.

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      Linus Torvalds [url=http://www.linux-magazine.com/Online/News/Linus-Torvalds-Windows-7-Rocks<]recommends Windows 7[/url<]. It totally rocks!

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    I went through an intense pass of hating Microsoft for a number of reasons. I still wish Linux was a more popular platform but I’m finding my hatred of Microsoft waning. Then they go and do this. Stop screwing with me, Microsoft!

    • edwpang
    • 2 years ago

    When MSFT can support 32 bit code?

    [url<]https://wpdev.uservoice.com/forums/266908-command-prompt-console-bash-on-ubuntu-on-windo/suggestions/13377507-please-add-32-bit-elf-support-to-the-kernel[/url<] They still do not have plan to support it though it's among top 10 of user requests.

      • cygnus1
      • 2 years ago

      What 32 bit binaries are people wanting to run that would need this?

        • davidbowser
        • 2 years ago

        From a business perspective, I am guessing it is for old COTS or custom (lost source) software.

        I am no longer surprised by how often this happens. There are only so many times you can ask, “Why are you doing that?” and get the answer, “Because that’s the way we have always done it.” before you simply stop asking.

          • BIF
          • 2 years ago

          That’s when I say “let’s find a better way to do this before (insert director’s or VP’s name here) finds out about this, and then we can make it into a good thing for performance review time.”

          “That’s the way we’ve always done it” can only hurt you at my employer, unless it is accompanied by some options.

        • Saribro
        • 2 years ago

        A lot of toolchains for embedded software are distributed as 32bit binaries only.
        It’s really annoying.

        I ran into this exact problem yesterday at work while I was testing whether we could get our build system moved to WSL.

          • BIF
          • 2 years ago

          Shaming is a valid technique. Apply liberally, rinse, then repeat.

        • Laykun
        • 2 years ago

        Wine

    • willmore
    • 2 years ago

    So, Windows is only good for launching Linux VMs? How about we just cut out the middle man here.

      • blahsaysblah
      • 2 years ago

      WSL is not a VM. Its an abstraction/mapping layer of linux kernel to windows kernel. It is not 100% complete either. Too many edge cases. You end up needing Win 10 Pro for free Hyper-V to run actual Linux VMs.

      Unless you want another voodoo layer added to your debugging layers.

        • LauRoman
        • 2 years ago

        I’m still not sure what WSSL is. Is it more like Cygwin or like Wine, because it’s definitely not a VM or an emulation.

          • Klimax
          • 2 years ago

          Neither:
          [url<]https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/wsl/2016/04/22/windows-subsystem-for-linux-overview/[/url<] Also I suggest reading other posts on that blog, a lot of information is there about whole WSL.

          • blahsaysblah
          • 2 years ago

          Definitely not Cygwin, you are installing and running actual/exact same Ubuntu packages and binaries. These are not recompiled as win32 executables.

          It mostly works, but not if you want to develop for Linux production environment(app that runs on linux server) versus just use Linux as your environment.

    • sweatshopking
    • 2 years ago

    You can also do complete iOS development on windows now. A mac is only required to submit to the app store.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      That’s actually pretty cool. It might save me from having to buy a macbook at some point just to have a dev box.

        • DancinJack
        • 2 years ago

        I’d still suggest having a macOS device tbh. It’s just so much easier.

          • sweatshopking
          • 2 years ago

          You’ve used the new studio? What makes it easier?

            • Ninjitsu
            • 2 years ago

            it’s a mac, duh, ez

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          Visual Studio 17 on macOS is a joke. Unstable and full of memory leaks. Sure it’s a preview but it’s just awful. I’m doing my Xamarin work on Windows and testing on the iOS simulator via the Visual Studio Xamarin remote tools.

          I tried VS17 and after around 90 minutes of edit/compile/test it would consume around 6GB of memory. The same project loaded fresh and run once in the simulator takes less than a GB. It just grows and grows and becomes unresponsive until you kill it and start again.

        • cygnus1
        • 2 years ago

        Getting MacOS running in VMWare Player on Windows is really a lot easier than you’d imagine. And it’s free.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      As someone who has multiple friends who have written for iOS and had to buy a Mac to develop on, I can imagine the collective rejoicing.

      • spiketheaardvark
      • 2 years ago

      Many of the tools for bioinfomatics, like sequencing analysis, use python packages that depend on linux libraries. WSL has saved me from having to swallow my pride and get a mac. I feel like a rebel with my ASUS laptop in a sea of macbook pros. It’s really done everything I could ask of it. I’ve even run shell scripts that switch in between powershell and bash during a task. There are some quirks and I can’t use an IDE (without some hackery that i’m not in the mood for. it’s surely the most requested feture and Microsoft has indicated they plan on adding the needed support).
      I’m sure it drives the Linux purists nuts but it’s one of the smartest things Microsoft has done in years

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      YOU’RE STILL HERE!

        • sweatshopking
        • 2 years ago

        i come by once in a while. Not terribly often as I find the site covers less as well as it did historically. I don’t often log in, and post even less.

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