Ryzen Mobile APUs are coming to a laptop near you

Here's a big announcement from AMD's 2017 Financial Analyst Day: Ryzen is finally coming to laptops and notebooks. AMD senior VP Jim Anderson pulled the cat out of the bag. The Ryzen Mobile CPUs won't just bring a lower-TDP Zen architecture—the CPUs will pack on-die Vega graphics cores, too.

AMD is promising that Ryzen Mobile should offer 50% better CPU performance and 40% better GPU performance than its A-series APUs. Perhaps more importantly than either of those measurements is the promised 50% drop in power requirements versus those APUs.

The company says that consumers can expect machines with Ryzen Mobile inside during the second half of this year. Commercial deployments are expected to being in the first half of 2018. AMD equally expects that Ryzen Mobile will go into "premium form factors," which we take to mean ultrabooks. Given that AMD hasn't really been a contender in the mobile space for a while, this is all welcome news.

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    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    Fingers crossed these don’t suck. I need a new Ultrabook.

      • Bumper
      • 2 years ago

      If they come suitably equipped and reasonably fast, for around a grand, ill get one.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        I’d expect them to go for the bottom of the market first, but if the battery life is decent and the GPU portion is strong enough for some light gaming…I’m in the same boat.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Wouldn’t an Ultrabook with gaming chops be great?!

      I’d take 15-35W thin and light over a GTX 1050 laptop if the Vega cores are capable of 1080p30 medium settings in that power envelope.

      40% better GPU performance than the A-series is a bit vague, simply because the A-series ranges from 256CU 12W to 512CU 45W models. As far as I know, only the 65W Carrizo and Bristol Ridge options can (barely) manage 1080p30 in popular mainstream games.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        I don’t mind low settings really, if I’m on the go. Intel integrated just doesn’t cut it for various reasons. πŸ™‚

    • srg86
    • 2 years ago

    Since these have Vega cores, I’m assuming us Linux users won’t get a display.

    [url<]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Linux-4.12-MIA-Features[/url<] Not until DC/DAL gets pushed into the mainline kernel, then of course the distributions needs to pick it up. And yes I quite happily use Linux on my notebook (dual booted with Windows). Not sure if that applies to both the open source version of the drive or also the AMDPRO what ever-its-called driver as well, I though they used the same kernel component.

      • Railarian
      • 2 years ago

      On Linux, until DC lands into mainline you can either build your own, out-of-tree kernel, or use AMDGPU-PRO, which will work as it has all necessary bits build in, it doesn’t need kernel for output.

    • Tristan
    • 2 years ago

    Power 50% less πŸ™‚
    And they still claim that Polaris is 2.8 more power efficient than previous πŸ™‚
    Stream of jokes

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Sorry, a haiku needs five syllables in the first line, seven in the second, and five in the third.

        • maxxcool
        • 2 years ago

        great.. i just ‘snorked my coffee’ and made mess.. πŸ˜› well played.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 2 years ago

        [url=https://www.howmanysyllables.com/words/stream<]Huh.[/url<] Learn something new every day I guess.

      • Rza79
      • 2 years ago

      If you look here:
      [url<]https://www.computerbase.de/2017-01/radeon-hd-7870-vs-r9-380-rx-480-vergleich/2/#abschnitt_benchmarks_von_skyrim_bis_battlefield_1[/url<] [url<]https://www.computerbase.de/2017-01/radeon-hd-7870-vs-r9-380-rx-480-vergleich/3/#abschnitt_mehr_leistung_mehr_leistungsaufnahme[/url<] 46% more performance for 13% less power. If the Fury Nano is anything to go by then maybe down-clocking Polaris to the performance level of a R9 380 would drop power with 100W. That would make it close to 2x more efficient. 2.8x seems impossible. Maybe they mean on a SIMD level.

    • yeeeeman
    • 2 years ago

    I think these have potential. We saw that Ryzen CPU respond very well when frequency/voltage is dropped in respect to power consumption. The fact that R7 1700, a 8/16 core/thread CPU can fit into ~65W-ish is very impressive. So I imagine that a one CCX CPU at ~2.5Ghz with boost to 3.5Ghz or more + a vega GPU will easily fit in 45W while offering great performance. Lets not forget that 7700K looks so great because it has a very high boost frequency. On the mobile, Intel doesn’t dream of reaching those frequencies while remaining in a specific power-budget, so Ryzen mobile might very well be competitive from a performance/power consumption perspective.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 2 years ago

    Raven Ridge is something interesting. Vega GPU with Mobile Ivy-Bridge/Haswell class CPU but with lower power consumption compared to its predecessor? Sounds interesting. Off-course when AMD talks power-consumption one has to use a mountain of salt but still this sounds interesting.

    [url<]https://www.notebookcheck.net/AMD-PRO-A12-9800B-SoC-Benchmarks-and-Specs.207586.0.html[/url<] So if we use AMD-PRO-A12-9800B as the base and take the most optimistic estimate (50% CPU) PassMark - 4284 >> 6426 Cinebench R15 (SC) - 77 >> 116 Geekbench 3 (SC) - 2031 >> 3046 To be fair, AMD-PRO-A12-9800B is not the fastest Bristol-Ridge and is rated only at 15w TDP. Fastest would be FX-9830P and A12-9830B at 35w TDP. But other than PassMark, I can't find benchmarks for them.

    • bhtooefr
    • 2 years ago

    Only 50% more CPU performance than Construction cores? Hmm.

      • Dudeface
      • 2 years ago

      For half the power. Performance increase would be more at the same power.

      I wonder when we will see these new APUs for the desktop?

        • bhtooefr
        • 2 years ago

        Good point – could mean that they’re getting 1.5x performance of the 35 W SKUs for 17.5 W, which would be legitimately a major step forward.

        • Beahmont
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, but the old APU’s for mobile were not that power hungry for the clock speeds they ran at, they just had even less compute power than you would expect for the power they did use.

        And again I make the complaint against presuming linear scaling. The power->clockspeed curve is absolutely not linear. We have no ideal what clock speeds these things will get in what power envelope. We just don’t know enough about the Zen Β΅Arch and the Vega Β΅Arch to make that kind of guess at this point. That said I would be very surprised if the Vega iGPU used less power than an entire Zen CCX, so at least a third of the power budget has to go to the Vega iGPU. That doesn’t leave that much power for the Zen CCX.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 2 years ago

        It’s not clear whether those benefits are an “or” situation or an “and” situation.

        I hope they are an “and”, but it’s no guarantee.

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      Even disregarding the improved TDP, Ryzen aimed for and slightly beat a 40% IPC improvement target over construction cores so 50% is right on the money.

    • cmrcmk
    • 2 years ago

    Did they specify the GPU is on-die, not simply on-package?

      • bhtooefr
      • 2 years ago

      On the second slide, it does say:

      [quote<]On-Die "Vega" Graphics[/quote<] I'd guess that it's only one Zen cluster, to make room for the graphics section.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder if these might end up in MacBooks.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    As important as Ryzen is for desktops against Intel, the real make-or-break is the mobile space.

    I just assume when staff are talking about their home PC that it’s a laptop. Very few people even own a desktop anymore, I think it’s just people who game and those that work from home.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      Or my elderly mother, who needs a much bigger screen and better keyboard than a laptop can offer (and has less than zero use for a mobile device — yes, portability is a net negative)

        • whm1974
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah that’s one of the reasons I’ve never gotten a laptop yet. Can’t stand their keyboards.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Yep, that’s definitely a valid use case for a desktop rather than a laptop.

        Here’s the interesting trend; Nettops with [i<]mobile chips[/i<] in them are out-selling traditional desktops at the internet/email/word-processing end of the spectrum. Plugging a ZBox into a 50" TV and running 1366x768 sure works wonders for people with vision problems. My dad does this with a logitech K400. He's only using a 42" TV but at the same time he's only sitting four feet from it too.

          • UberGerbil
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<]Here's the interesting trend; Nettops with mobile chips in them are out-selling traditional desktops at the internet/email/word-processing end of the spectrum. [/quote<]That's interesting, and I'd totally believe it -- got a link? My mother had an old Dell SFF box (how old? One word: Turion) from ~2009 that finally died early this year; I replaced it with a new S-erFF Intel NUC (how new? Two words: Kaby Lake). But it's still plugged into her 19" 1280x1024 monitor, the keyboard she likes, the mouse she knows and loves. And the USB Type C port is doing... nothing. I thought about getting her a Chrome box, but she likes the custom Thunderbird skin I have for her email (giant fonts everywhere!) and I like being able to remote in via Teamviewer to solve problems (and she'd still have problems on a Chromebox) I've also thought about putting a 30" 1080 monitor on her desk (that's the biggest that would comfortably fit; I don't want to go down to 720 -- she complains about not having enough room for her emails as it is -- and her eyes aren't [i<]that[/i<] bad). But a lot of 1080 screens in that size range are really just cheap TVs, and the quality seems to be pretty bad.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            No link, just walk into a brick and mortar these days; Traditional desktops barely feature, if at all.

            What I see all over Europe (well, okay just UK, France, Germany & Austria) is a huge laptop section and if the store is big enough, a few pre-built gaming PCs and maybe an all-in-one.

            There’s always a section selling Acer, Asus, Gigabyte, Zotac, Dell, or HP SFF nettops – and usually the same section of the store drops down to the android Roku boxes, Nvidia shield and things like the Firestick/Chromecast – for Netflix and streaming duties. The AppleTV is there if it’s not in the dedicated Apple section, too. If you add the number of items on the shelves, Nettops and streaming devices outnumber desktops 10-to-1, easily.

            [i<]Edit: As far as low-DPI screens go, there are 27 and 32" 1080p VA gaming monitgors (with speakers) from Acer and Samsung to name just two vendors. I had an XZ271 that was VA, 144Hz 1080p, 27". Since it was Freesync rather than G-Sync I picked it up for Β£170 excluding tax. LG have joined the cheap, high-refresh, low-dpi gaming monitor scene with excellent IPS panels but I dont' think they make anything in the 30" range without being an ultrawide.[/i<]

            • UberGerbil
            • 2 years ago

            I haven’t been in a brick and mortar like Best Buy in a long time. I do go into Fry’s but they still have desktops (mostly aimed at gamers, I think; they also have an aisle of desktop cases, RGB fans, liquid coolers, etc). The Roku-ish stuff is in a completely different area, next to the TVs.

            Yeah, after this discussion I went looking on NewEgg again for 27-32″ 1080 monitors. It looks like there’s a fair selection in the $200-$300 range. The one bummer is that none of them include a USB hub, which my mother’s current monitor has and which makes the arrangement of cabling much simpler — the mouse and keyboard connect to the monitor, and the computer itself can sit behind the monitor. Even a USB 2.0 hub would be fine, but it looks like that’s a dead feature. (I’d love to have a cam built into the monitor as well, but that feature seems to have gone completely)

      • rechicero
      • 2 years ago

      Or people that don’t need the portability and can buy a better desktop for less money…

      • Magic Hate Ball
      • 2 years ago

      Not just laptops for APU.

      So many business desktops are run with integrated graphics only. Imagine getting an i7 equivalent for all your desktops for the price of an i5.

      Some Office workflows (like Excel) can actually use more threads if I remember correctly. You should see the calculations and the sheer size of sheets in a decent sized company’s accounting department.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]The company says that consumers can expect machines with Ryzen Mobile inside during the second half of this year. Commercial deployments are expected to being in the first half of 2018. [/quote<] That means LATE this year. We'll see how they stack up to Cannonlake in mobile.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      That definitely misses both the back-to-school market and the Q4-use-it-or-lose-it corporate budget window. The former probably hurts more, both because a laptop with decent graphics is more compelling for that market and because the inevitable evaluation process will delay any AMD-based devices from getting on approved lists before 2018 anyway.

        • Phartindust
        • 2 years ago

        Not necessarily, 2H starts in July. They say consumers (us) can expect machines with Ryzen inside, so in stores for purchase for holiday shopping at least. I’m still hopeful for late back to school, say Sept. Hopeful, but not holding my breath.

          • UberGerbil
          • 2 years ago

          Back-to-school sales start in July and most of the shopping is done by August*. In order for product to be in stores by July, it has to ship in June. If they’re in stores for September, that’s at best “a little early for Black Friday”

          * No, [url=https://www.offers.com/blog/post/back-to-school-survey-data/<]seriously[/url<]: [quote<]When do you typically start back-to-school shopping? July – 23.4% August – 51.6% After school starts – 7.0% Tax-Free Weekend – 6.9% None of the Above – 11.2%[/quote<]

            • Phartindust
            • 2 years ago

            Hence why I said hopeful, but not holding my breath for back to school. September is nearly 3 months before Black Friday. That’s more than just a little early, and should be enough time for word to get around.

            • willmore
            • 2 years ago

            Tax-Free Weekend? What’s that?

            • Flying Fox
            • 2 years ago

            [url<]https://www.freetaxweekend.com/[/url<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            back to school shopping starts in May when so many school supplies around here are on clearance. πŸ˜†

      • sreams
      • 2 years ago

      “We’ll see how they stack up to Cannonlake in mobile.”

      If you care about GPU performance, probably exceedingly well.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        We’ll see about that. I have no doubt that a 95 watt Ryzen APU can beat a midrange 7700K in graphics, but taking the power envelope away won’t help AMD.

      • Phartindust
      • 2 years ago

      Hmm, maybe sooner than we think:

      [url<]https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fhardwaresfera.com%2Fasus-ha-anunciado-primer-laptop-gaming-una-apu-basada-amd-ryzen-amd-vega%2F&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AFQjCNFedCybLj2ISzoaIx1MWREHWylBuQ[/url<]

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