Samsung’s high-end Chromebook Pro will be available May 28

Back at CES, Samsung announced the Chromebook Plus and Chromebook Pro. The two machines are externally-identical magnesium-cased convertibles poised to fill the curious market niche of "high-end Chromebook." The only difference between them is the choice of processor. The Chromebook Plus uses a Rockchip-manufactured and Google-approved OP1 ARM-based SoC, while the Pro taps Intel for its processing power. The Plus model came out in February, but the Pro is only just hitting the market.

In case you haven't seen these machines before, here's what they look like: folding-type convertible laptops packing a 12.3" touchscreen with a resolution of 2400×1600 and pen input support. You get 4GB of LP-DDR3 shared memory and 32GB of eMMC storage—both considerable amounts for a Chromebook. Another unusual high-end feature is the presence of a 802.11ac Wi-Fi adapter with 2×2 MIMO support.

The soon-to-be-available Pro model uses a Core m3-6Y30 CPU, a dual-core Skylake chip that starts out at 900 MHz and can turbo to 2.2 GHz. This processor should offer better single-threaded performance than the ARM-based OP1 SoC in the Chromebook Plus, though that characteristic might not necessarily translate into better application performance. However, it's possible that some apps may only support an x86 CPU. The choice of an Intel chip could also make the Chromebook Pro more attractive to hackers looking to install an alternative OS on the little laptop.

While the Chromebook Plus and its ARM SoC go for $450 as of this writing, the privilege of having Intel inside will cost you an extra $100. Samsung says the Chromebook Pro will be available for $550 on May 28 at Best Buy, Amazon, and Samsung.com.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Remind me – Chrome OS; Still not Android, still not Linux, still tethered to the cloud by Google decree?

    I’d be willing to be that there’s an iPad-like market out there of people who want a decent Android “laptop” but Chrome OS is a pretty big turn off for me, so the concept of a high-end device hindered by Chrome OS is crazy. An oxymoron, even.

    I haven’t touched Chrome OS for two years or more, but whilst it definitely has a place in the market, it is limited to either education (where removing control of the device from users is pretty important) or entry-level web/office/media-consumption. Neither of these are “high-end” by their nature.

      • flip-mode
      • 2 years ago

      Speaking for myself: I love my Chromebook, but it could definitely be faster in a couple of ways. It definitely suffers from a bit of lag and also slow load times on ad-infested web pages. And one time I plugged two usb 2.0 sticks in and transferred maybe 2 gigs of files from one to the other. That was one of the most miserable file transfer experiences I have had in my life; we probably have to go back to floppy disks to talk about slower file transfer performance.

      As far as Chrome OS… 360 days of the year, all I want out of my home computer is to use the internet. I certainly do not need a full-fledged desktop operating system for that.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    High end and eMMC… Does not compute.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      “High-end Chromebook”, boss. It’s like the LX version of a Kia.

        • DancinJack
        • 2 years ago

        lol

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Still boots and shuts down in seconds. If you’re doing large file transfers on a Chromebook, you don’t want a Chromebook (as I learned myself…Also not great at local video playback or torrents)

    • hungarianhc
    • 2 years ago

    I hope there’s a $650 version with 8GB of RAM and a faster CPU.

      • whm1974
      • 2 years ago

      And not mention a much bigger SSD for those of us who want to put a real OS on it.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Not to mention a Vega discrete GPU.

        Oh, and cut the price to $99 or so.

          • DancinJack
          • 2 years ago

          49

          • synthtel2
          • 2 years ago

          Since when is a bigger SSD such an onerous thing to ask for? It doesn’t pose any particular technical difficulties, the marketing department surely wouldn’t have any complaint about it, and it would be a very useful upgrade for a lot of users. An extra 32 GB is even really cheap.

        • blahsaysblah
        • 2 years ago

        4GB of soldered RAM, this is an appliance/netbook.

          • synthtel2
          • 2 years ago

          The vast majority of the non-gaming-related things I do still fit comfortably in 4GB, and most of that is just Firefox.

          Were I in the market for a laptop, 4GB of RAM and that m3-6Y30 would sound excellent. If I need more power than that, I’ve got a desktop to handle it, but that doesn’t mean I don’t want other so-called premium features like decent build quality and a screen that doesn’t suck. If something like this can deliver that for significantly cheaper than a normal laptop, it’d definitely be in the running.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            I’ve found it quite easy to hit 4GB in just browser usage personally.

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            In anything WebKit-derived, absolutely. FF seems to have gotten even better since I last checked – I was going to say I have a tough time making it use more than 3GB, but I just opened up (and visited all tabs to ensure loading) all the stuff to simulate the largest RAM footprint I’d typically ask of it, and it’s sitting here at 1.3GB between the two processes. That’s with 19 tabs from 17 domains.

          • hungarianhc
          • 2 years ago

          that’s not relevant. Many Chromebooks have higher-end configs with more RAM / CPU. See Lenovo Chromebook 13, Asus C302CA, etc.

        • hungarianhc
        • 2 years ago

        If you want an OS other than Chrome OS… maybe don’t buy a ChromeBook?

    • Whispre
    • 2 years ago

    But… Why?

      • hungarianhc
      • 2 years ago

      Computing on a high-end Chromebook is actually a really awesome experience…

      Edit: And with Android apps being fully integrated into the experience, I think it will get even better.

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        Cautiously optimistically waiting on Android apps. I got an Acer Chromebook 14 for travel, it’s fine for general puttering about the web, but local video playback is pretty shitty (VLC runs through the Android runtime and doesn’t take advantage of hardware decode, native player can’t use subs, etc), torrent apps through Javascript are slow, etc.

          • hungarianhc
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah for sure… I mean the Chromebook 14 is a decent device for browsing the web and stuff, but it doesn’t have a high-end Intel CPU and 8GB+ of RAM. That’s when I think Chrome OS gets fun.

      • slowriot
      • 2 years ago

      Because its important a company like Samsung offer a variety of options for one of the fastest growing computing platforms. Like it or not Chrome OS already owns the US K-12 education market and as it becomes more capable and more general it’ll gain traction else where too.

        • DancinJack
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, like on my couch!

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