Fractal Design finds a new Focus on entry-level cases

Fractal Design has expanded its lineup of cases downward. The new ATX-size Focus G and the micro-ATX Focus G Mini offer steel-and-plastic construction with a composite side window. Each case ships with a pair of Fractal Silent Series PWM-controlled fans with white LED illumination.

Both cases can take in six fans. There are two fan mounts on both the front and top panels, plus another mount on the back and one on the bottom. All fan locations fit 120-mm spinners, though the larger Focus G can also accept a pair of 140-mm units in the front panel if the bottom external drive bay is unoccupied. The front, top, and rear fan mounts on both cases can accept radiators, though the front mount of the smaller Focus G Mini can only accept a 240-mm unit if the lower 5.25" drive bay is empty.

The Focus G cases can accept higher-end hardware than one might expect to fit in entry level-cases. Graphics cards can be as long as 15" (38 cm) and tower-style air coolers can be up to to 6.5" (16 cm) tall. Power supplies up to 9.0" (23 cm) are invited to the party, though builders will need to pick a presentable one, as the Focus G cases lack a power supply shroud. Both cases have two increasingly-irrelevant 5.25" external drive bays, two sleds for 2.5" or 3.5" drives, and one 2.5" drive mount on the back of the motherboard tray.

Fractal's Focus G cases are priced right at or just below $50, depending on the model. The ATX model is available in black or white and the micro-ATX unit comes in any color buyers want, as long as it's black.

Comments closed
    • Major-Failure
    • 2 years ago

    I imagine that life as a computer case manufacturer isn’t easy. The product lasts forever and the only reason to upgrade is building a completely new rig while giving the old one away (to the wife, for example). What’s the margin on a $50 case anyways? $10?

    I own a Fractal Design R4 white and I love it. It’s always sad to see a company go for bargain bin pricing, because it rarely ends with that company prospering.

      • just brew it!
      • 2 years ago

      Yup. My old Chieftec full towers are still in perfectly fine shape and two are even still in use (file server and wife’s desktop, respectively). Two systems which were retired just recently were in beige mid-towers from the 1990s.

    • just brew it!
    • 2 years ago

    Not interested unless they offer it without the side window.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      They don’t list any non-window SKUs on the product page.

      [url<]http://www.fractal-design.com/home/product/cases/focus-series/focus-g[/url<]

    • kmm
    • 2 years ago

    What’s the point of mATX case models that are more or less exactly the same thing as the regular ATX models except 3 slots shorter? Is that really the space-saving difference maker? There are exceptions but I think usually height is the least important dimension anyway.

    Apparently they sell enough to justify doing this repeatedly, though, so never mind me.

      • slowriot
      • 2 years ago

      Well… name a significantly smaller mATX case that can still fit an ATX PSU and full length (GTX1080 sized) GPU. There’s maybe a couple? They’re not that much smaller though. My point being the mATX motherboard form factor is kind of a worthless inbetween IMO. It’s popular for some reason but doesn’t save you much in functional space over ATX. Personally I just go ATX or all the way down to mITX if I want small.

        • libradude
        • 2 years ago

        Thermaltake Core V21 immediately comes to mind; it’s a much smaller cube, yet can still fit ATX PSUs and full length GPUs. And it’s awesome.

          • slowriot
          • 2 years ago

          The Core V21 seems to actually be on the large end for mATX cases and in fact is larger than a very compact ATX-capable case like the NZXT S340.

          [url<]https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1flQL0FFKLO0JXywdtWbCbbDB7xdKUVBIVNOLGKQQZ5g/edit?usp=sharing[/url<] I put most of that spreadsheet together a year or two ago but its still fairly accurate for the market. The Silverstone SG10 on volume is the real standout in mATX size wise. I feel there's another mATX case out there that may be close to the SG10 now but it escapes me. Either way're talking 2 or 3 choices tops.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 2 years ago

        There are several more compact micro-ATX cases available.

        The Focus G (ATX) is 39.8 liters (2426 in³) with a footprint of 143 in².
        The Focus G Mini (micro-ATX) is 32.5 liters (1981 in³) with a footprint of 136 in².

        32½ liters isn’t terrible. Here are a few others for comparison:
        [url<]https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=116344[/url<]

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      Some evangelise mATX, but as you point out, the basics are simple: a few inches/centimeters in height chopped off from the loss of three slots is about the long and short of the standards ‘advantage’ over ATX.

      [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroATX<]Reference from Wikipedia:[/url<] Both are 244mm in max depth, but mATX is limited to 244mm in height, whereas ATX goes to 305mm, per the standard. It should be noted however that the standards define the maximum size, while in actual implementations mATX boards, even performance-oriented ones, may be purposefully shallower for inclusion in compact builds. So, in practice, mATX builds can be significantly smaller if attention is paid to the size of all components involved. However, one might state that for run-of-the-mill builds, the differences are next to nil except for price, if pennies are being counted. Actually compact mATX builds with performance parts are a bit of a luxury thing, most especially so if they're also quiet.

        • kmm
        • 2 years ago

        I think mATX has some uses, just not as much in the traditional tower format where you’re just cutting a bit of height, where the ATX variant isn’t compact to begin with. You could use mATX to make a ~260 mm wide case with the motherboard horizontal to the ground, for example. It could make sense for HTPC builds. For something like the Jonsbo U3, which is around 20 liters, having the fewer spots feels like more like it’s doing something.

        Personally I just use a Lian-Li PC-Q33, which is ITX and admittedly constrains graphics card length to around 220 mm, which is fine for me because I don’t exactly play AAA games on release and need enthusiast graphics cards.

      • brucethemoose
      • 2 years ago

      I do wish more had a SG10-like layout, with the PSU in front of the CPU heatsink to use up that normally dead space.

      • ET3D
      • 2 years ago

      In this case I don’t see the point of the full ATX case, considering that it has the same small number of drive slots. Why go ATX for a low end build? It’s not like people stick anything in motherboard slots except one graphics card.

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      I personally don’t use mATX to save space, but because I don’t need much stuff in the case to begin with. I’d probably be ok with ITX but I’m not really comfortable with it yet.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 2 years ago

    Looks like some of the higher-end stuff by Corsair, so thumbs up!

    • Pulsar_the_Spacenerd
    • 2 years ago

    I do hope this can accept addition HDD cages, 2 is a bit low.
    Though for $50 this is probably a darn good case.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Well, for the standard 1-2 drive build, this is perfect – but if you really want to cram more disks into it, you can get two 2.5″ drives per single 5.25″ bay with simple, cheap adapters – that would let you run 7 drives total.

      Or, if you really want 3.5″ drives, even though this case isn’t the best starting point, you can get several triple 3.5″ bays that occupy two consecutive 5.25″ bays, for a total of 5 3.5″ drives and a 2.5″ SSD behind the board.

      Since very few boards come with more than 6 SATA ports, you’re already able to fill every SATA port on most boards with this case.

        • ET3D
        • 2 years ago

        I still would have liked more drive bays. Drives are the thing I upgrade the most, and it usually makes sense to just add a new drive, instead of replacing the old one. As you say, it’s possible to put more drives in, but it’s less comfortable than putting them in proper slots.

        It’s not really *that* bad, though, given that this case has 2 3.5″ slots plus place for a dedicated 2.5″ drive, and also given that most motherboards have space for an NVMe drive these days. So the basic configuration of SSD + 3.5″ HDD leaves one 3.5″ drive slot and either an NVMe or 2.5″ slot.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    PWM fans in entry-level cases are a nice surprise. For that reason alone these would get a recommendation from me for budget builds, assuming the layout isn’t horrible (and it doesn’t seem to be)

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