Cryorig Cu heatsinks are cool in copper

Teasers for next week's Computex event are starting to trickle out. The CPU-cooling gurus over at Cryorig sent over information about a new lineup of copper heatsinks affectionately called Cu, and an upcoming Cryorig R5 tower cooler. Let's take a look at the aluminum job first.

Cryorig says it designed its R5 cooler to offer efficient cooling performance in a slim profile. The cooler has two XF140 fans attached on either side of a single tower of aluminum fins, but the whole unit is narrow enough that it won't hang over the RAM slots. Six copper heat pipes transfer heat to the fin stack. Instead of a flat arrangement of heat pipes in the base, Cryorig uses a convex arrangement that puts the central pipes closer to the CPU. Cryorig also says that it will debut a new "Quick Lock" mounting mechanism with this cooler, though we'll have to wait until Computex to get more information on how it works.

Cryorig's upcoming Cu series of heatsinks seems designed to prove that everything old becomes new again. Hearkening back to the days of massive copper cooling contraptions, Cryorig plans to re-release many of its existing cooling designs retrofitted with copper fins. The first cooler to receive this treatment will be the low-profile Cryorig C7. Judging from the company's promotional materials, it looks like five other Cryorig coolers will be reborn in copper, including the massive R1 Ultimate. Nostalgia aside, Cryorig thinks these coolers will have a performance edge over their aluminum brothers due to the superior heat conductivity of copper.

Cryorig hasn't yet announced full details on the coolers, including release dates and pricing. More information is likely to be forthcoming after Computex next week.

Comments closed
    • shaq_mobile
    • 3 years ago

    That old zalman is actually the iconic picture in my mind if awesome heatsinks. It was fun seeing that again… Brings back memories of browsing TR from my high school library computers. Ah. 🙂

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      LOL. They certainly had some of the nicest looking heatsinks. Not bad performance either, but in the long run, their fans fail (like all fans), and can’t be replaced. I stick with heatsinks that can mount standard fans.

    • Wonders
    • 3 years ago

    Bet this thing’s gonna be popular in Vietnam.

    • Welch
    • 3 years ago

    Funny, I was just considering making a post the other day regarding all of these new CPU coolers that claim ultimate performance and space saving… But then ignore using copper which is so much more effective at thermal transfer than aluminum. I guess at some point the expense of copper would make the cost of the unit too high and bleeding over into AIO closed loop cooling solutions. What a shame.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      It probably isn’t expense. We used to have all-copper heatsinks and their performance was surpassed by copper/alu hybrids over a decade ago.

      Copper’s thermal conductivity is ~70% higher than aluminium, but the effectiveness of a heatsink is actually determined by how fast it can radiate that heat to the air and dissipate the energy. When it comes to how well a surface radiates heat, the material it is made from is largely irrelevant, but attributes such as light colour and matte surface are favourable. Since aluminium is lighter in colour and less shiny, it is the superior material for heatsink fins. The fact that it’s cheaper, easier to manufacture, and lighter are also valuable properties.

      Think of it this way:
      Copper is the best material for transferring heat away from the CPU die to the fins.
      Aluminium is the best materials for radiating that transferred heat away.

      Looking at the surface reflectivity and thermal conductivity tables, it would seem that pure magnesium would actually make a better heatsink fin than aluminium, but it’s likely much harder to manufacture one out of magnesium.

        • BurntMyBacon
        • 3 years ago

        The Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme Copper defies your explanation:
        [url<]https://www.hardocp.com/article/2008/11/19/thermalright_ultra_extreme_copper_cpu_cooler_review/[/url<] It uses the same design as the Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme only it has copper fins (and no nickle plating). While the difference isn't exceptionally large (more on that later) the copper version still clearly wins, where by your assessment, it should lose. [quote="Chripsy_"<]... the effectiveness of a heatsink is actually determined by how fast it can radiate that heat to the air and dissipate the energy.[/quote<] I believe the issue lies in the premise here. If radiant heat dissipation is the dominant heat removal method, then your suggestion that aluminum is better for fins may in fact be correct, though I'd want to take a long look at nickle plating as well. However, radiant heat dissipation only dominates cooling methods if we operate in a vacuum. If we are dealing with no forced airflow, then convective heat dissipation is dominant, I don't know how influential radiant considerations are here, but I suspect (as with forced airflow) effective surface area is the biggest consideration. If, however, we add a fan to the mix (as most cooling enthusiast do), the dynamic changes significantly from radiant heat dissipation. We can reduce the effective thermal resistivity of air by creating more airflow through the heat sink, but this comes at a cost of noise and power. We can also reduce the thermal resistivity of the heatsink by adding more surface area and using high conductivity interface plates. However, more surface area is only useful if you can transfer the heat to that surface area with less thermal resistance than is present between the fins and air given a defined airflow. Fully conductive methods, to transfer heat, run into diminishing returns quickly as even with copper's conductivity, the heat cannot spread quickly enough to justify more fins as the get farther from the heat interface. That said, with copper's 70% greater thermal conductivity, full copper heatsinks thoroughly out performed their aluminum and hybrid counterparts before the use of heat-pipes became prominent. Heat-pipes (and vapor chambers) introduced a physical transfer mechanism for the heat that allowed one to effectively use fins much farther away for the interface plate. While copper fins still allow for better heat spreading on the fins, the majority of the heat transfer is already being done by the heat-pipes. Also, given the area constraints around the socket area of a motherboard and the dead zone in axial fans, fins are constrained such that they there isn't much effective surface area at larger distances from the heat-pipe point of contact. In other words, there simply isn't a whole lot to be gained by using copper for the fins. Contrast this with the added weight (Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme = <800g vs Copper version = ~1900g), expense ($75 vs $125), and malleability (copper will deform much more easily). The weight alone is problematic as even without moving the computer, it can damage a motherboard over time. Active pumps (Water Cooling) provide even greater heat transport, allowing for the heatsink (radiator) to be mounted to the chassis instead of the motherboard. This removes the risk of motherboard damage due to weight. However, most radiators make excellent use of water channels and they leave no fin in the radiator with any great distance from contact points with the water channel. Again, there is little to be gained by going full copper here. Of course, if you put 250+ CFM fans on your heatsink/radiator, then copper fins may have some value, but in many cases you'll run into the limitations of your interface plate or ambient room temperature and will need a sub-ambient technology to continue on.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    I actively avoid any coolers with custom fans, or at least any coolers with fan retention mechanisms that wouldn’t also fit a standard fan.

    Cryorig seem to make pretty decent products, but so do Noctua and my NH-U12 was a top quality product from 2005 that is still in service today. It’s on it’s third or fourth PWM fan and Noctua are happy to send me free adapter kits every time a new socket comes out.

    This custom Cryorig fan that has in-built heatsink clips is a big fat nope.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      On the tower cooler I’d agree, there’s no good reason for it.

      On the sub-50mm coolers the ducted arrangement of standard fans isn’t always the optimal one.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        My [url=http://noctua.at/en/nh-l9i<]NH-L9i[/url<] disagrees with your statement.

          • BurntMyBacon
          • 3 years ago

          Mine too. ;’)

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      Custom fans aren’t an issue if you change your heatsink as often as you change your processor, but for customers, like you (and me) that have Circa 2005 heatsinks still in service today, standard fan mounts are a must.

    • UberGerbil
    • 3 years ago

    These renders are nice. I wonder if the actual coolers will look as good.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Cryorig kit actually is made pretty nicely when you see it in the flesh, but I agree that renders often are used when the finish on the kit is below par.

      Phanteks and NZXT are also guilty of having render-heavy product pages on their sites, I wish they’d just take photos – almost all of their kit is higher quality than a lot of the competition.

      • Vespaman0
      • 3 years ago

      They look friggin sweet.
      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdGVVPVxdzI[/url<]

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