Asus ROG Swift PG35VQ display takes quantum dots to 200 Hz

Asus' ROG Swift PG35VQ packs pretty much every buzzword one could hope for with respect to a top-of-the-line gaming monitor in 2017. The 35" ultra-wide 21:9 display has a quantum-dot infused panel with a 3440×1440 resolution, can hit refresh rates up to 200 Hz, and has support for Nvidia's G-Sync adaptive refresh rate tech.

The ROG Swift PQ35VQ complies with the HDR10 specification and offers the required 1000 cd/m² of maximum brightness. Asus says that the display also has "support" for the DCI-P3 color space, but doesn't specify its coverage range. The PQ35VQ offers localized dimming provided by 512 LEDs, meaning that the extra brightness likely won't come at the expense of dark blacks. For reference, the ROG Swift PG27UQ has 384 LEDs behind its smaller 27" panel. Gamers looking to build arrays of these monitors will also appreciate its the slim bezels.

The back of the PG27UQ, for reference

Since the PG35VQ is an Asus ROG part in the year 2017, there's Aura-compatible RGB LED illumination as part of the package. The monitor's stand shines a ROG logo down onto the supporting surface and the back of the monitor sports a large ROG logo backlit with RGB LEDs.

Asus wasn't ready to talk about pricing or a release schedule, but all the buzzwords in the specs list mean that pricing will certainly be set at a premium. Interested gerbils should start saving.

Comments closed
    • UberGerbil
    • 2 years ago

    “Quantum Dots” always make me think of [url=http://nametheyeti.dippindots.com/static/img/app/winner/winner-yeti.png<]this[/url<]

    • spiritwalker2222
    • 2 years ago

    So, what’s the advantage of these quantum dot displays?

    Any disadvantages?

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      Advantage is greater color fidelity. Disadvantage is price premium.

    • Bensam123
    • 2 years ago

    Response time?

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      If you have to ask…

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    That looks like the best monitor on earth right now, but I’m sure that it’s priced to match.

    Sadly, my X34 blew my monitor budget through 2020.

    Still, if this newbie has ULMB, I might need to reevaluate the need for 2 kidneys…

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      Gotta get this in before Jeff dings you…remember, you can only initiate sales in the forums in The Bargain Basement section. No self-serve freelance internal organ sales in the comments.

        • morphine
        • 2 years ago

        We’re willing to make an exception for the exchange of a kidney for PC hardware. We’d be willing to entertain a front-page post for keeping track of bids.

          • Kretschmer
          • 2 years ago

          I appreciate your flexibility. It would really have to be a kidney and a lung (throwing in a pint of blood for free!) to cover both the monitor, the case upgrade, the PSU upgrade, and a pair of Volta Titans (why buy 200Hz if you can’t hit 200 FPS?).

            • Beahmont
            • 2 years ago

            At least you’ll still have spares ama’right?

            • Laykun
            • 2 years ago

            They grow back.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 2 years ago

    FreeSync. It’s FREE. Why not support it?

      • Firestarter
      • 2 years ago

      because nvidia

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      Panel partners like margins, and NVidia enjoys locking in gamers to their ecosystem while AMD fumbles high-end GPU products. How many gamers bought into GSync due to AMD’s lack of competitive offerings (this poster is one such party)?

      • Beahmont
      • 2 years ago

      Adaptive Sync is free. FreeSync is AMD’s Proprietary Brand Name VRR tech that is based, but not by any means exactly Adaptive Sync. It cost money to use the FreeSync brand name and the panels have to be submitted to a general and specific testing by AMD for quality control.

      Please stop with this myth. AMD does significant under the hood changes and additions to the Adaptive Sync VESA standard. AMD also charges money for branding and QC on the panels.

        • cynan
        • 2 years ago

        But are they significant changes though? Other then specifying a minimum variable refresh rate range for adaptive sync, what exactly does FreeSync additionally mandate? I’m genuinely curious.

          • torquer
          • 2 years ago

          Define significant. I’m guessing that there are a lot of factors that go into it, including but not limited to:

          1. Target market is primarily Nvidia customers (market research and steam surveys show Nvidia still has the majority of GPUs in the wild and being sold, even if it is not by a huge margin)

          2. Nvidia likely contributes to some kind of marketing share fund. This is common throughout the industry. Nvidia has a pot of money for assisting with “G Sync” display marketing and it saves manufactures some cash, gets them some additional exposure. AMD probably does something similar with FreeSync but given AMD’s cash position and likely far slimmer margin I’m assuming the pot with AMD is smaller

          3. G-Sync adds cost to the monitor, which drives up average selling price, which likely means increased margins and finance people love higher “average selling price”

          Ultimately it comes down to the money. Manufacturers aren’t religious about tech like commenters on the Internet. They’d sell matches to an arsonist if they could make a buck. Selling G-Sync vs FreeSync means more money for them I am sure. And I’m sure neither AMD or Nvidia allows partners to double up on display tech support which is why there are no FreeSync/G-Sync monitors (assuming there isn’t an underlying technical limitation)

          Its all about the benjamins.

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        Based on the quirks of most FreeSync displays, we can safely say that no one pays the QC fees.

          • Gasaraki
          • 2 years ago

          There was a article that said the the QC of G-Sync monitor were way better because in order to get the G-Sync chip and branding certification, nVidia has tight requirements that the monitor has to meet in order to be G-Sync branded.

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      Because Nvidia makes the fastest GPUs?

      • rahulahl
      • 2 years ago

      Because that would alienate the Nvidia userbase. Not many with an Nvidia GPU is gonna buy this expensive monitor with freesync instead of gync which is useless for them. If freesync worked with both, sure it makes sense. But right now since the companies have to chose one over the other, it makes financially more sense to chose gsync.

      • psuedonymous
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]Why not support it?[/quote<] Because if you're not building the panel controller yourself (as Nvidia are, and as all monitor manufacturers are not) you're limited to what existing panel controller manufacturers are willing to make. If nobody is making a controller that can already do 200Hz with high bit-depths, zonal backlight control, and a wide variable refresh range, then it's either G-sync or nothing. tl;dr: if you need to have someone make you a custom controller, you may as well have Nvidia do it and pay the R&D costs than do it yourself and shoulder the R&D costs.

    • Redocbew
    • 2 years ago

    RGB LEDs on the back of a monitor is some snarky joke I’d make here in the comments, and then wonder if anyone would actually do it.

    Now I guess I don’t have to wonder.

    Looks like a pretty nifty display all the same though.

      • brucethemoose
      • 2 years ago

      That’s actually a thing:

      [url<]https://www.svp-team.com/w/index.php?title=SVPlight[/url<] That's not what Asus did here, but it would be awesome if they did.

    • emorgoch
    • 2 years ago

    The only question left is panel type/color shifting. With a 200Hz refresh rate, my guess is either some type of VA or TN. I’ve never checked out a VA panel in person, but assuming the color shifting isn’t that bad, this might finally be the monitor I’ve been waiting for (though I could do without the gaudy “gaming” design elements).

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      based on resolution, shallow curvature and DCI-P3 support I would say that has to be IPS.

      LG make a native 144Hz IPS panel, and Asus has previously overclocked 60Hz panels to 100Hz, so this is likely to be a 144H model that is being pushed to 200Hz

      I don’t think it’ll be VA because the high-refresh VA tech seems to be mutually exclusive to high-DPI – you tend to see 30-35″ models at 2560×1080 and the 27-30″ models are usually 1920×1800. The VA curved panels are usually much more curved (1800R or 2000R) The shallow ~3000R curve pictured above is also an IPS characteristic.

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        LG’s native 144Hz panel is 1080P. I’m not sure what panel this is.

        Realistically, even a 1080Ti can’t push 200FPS @ 3440×1440 without severe image quality trade-offs, but there’s always the next generation!

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          I guessed wrong.

          panelook.com and [url<]http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/high_refresh_rate.htm[/url<] seem to indicate that the only panel in production that fits this spec is an AMVA AUO model - listed as Q3 2017. There really aren't that many production facilities for TFT panels on the planet, and they tend to list what they're going to release ahead of schedule. This is definitely the listed AUO panel and given the performance of the Predator Z35 (the previous curved, high-refresh AUO AMVA offering) I'd be waiting for reviews before ordering. For the record, I owned a Z35 for a week and sent it back in disgust, despite knowing about the poor performance. AUO didn't have the response times for 20Hz, let alone 200Hz.

            • floodo1
            • 2 years ago

            144hz IPS would be the perfect upgrade for my PG348Q (-8

            • Kretschmer
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah I’m skeptical of anything *VA that AUO puts out in UWS format. Samsung seems to be better with the response times, but the flickering on their flagship gives me pause.

            Still happy with my 2015 tech X34.

        • Voldenuit
        • 2 years ago

        theverge [url=https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/30/15712930/asus-rog-swift-pg35vq-35-inch-curved-gaming-monitor-computex-2017<]is reporting that this is an AU Optronics AMVA panel [/url<]similar to the one in the recently announced Acer Z35P. Now acer runs theirs at 100 Hz (user-overclockable to 120 Hz), but it might be able to run up to 200 Hz (although probably with some very aggressive RTC).

      • Gasaraki
      • 2 years ago

      It’s Quantum-dots so not TN

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