Dell taps AMD for the Inspiron Gaming Desktop and new AIOs

Dell has a bunch of new desktops systems on the way. The company announced the Inspiron Gaming Desktop this week, as well as a pair of AMD-powered Inspiron all-in-one systems.

The Inspiron Gaming desktop is a Ryzen-powered beast with a focus on easy upgrades and a budget price. The system can be specced out with up to an AMD Ryzen 7 1700X CPU at the top end, down to an AMD Ryzen 3 or AMD A10-9700 APU. The system can take in up to 32GB of DDR4 RAM. Dell is also offering power supplies up to 850W to allow for support for dual graphics cards. This is, however, a budget-focused system, so the graphics options reflect that. Graphics card options on the AMD side include the RX 560, 570 and 580, while the Nvidia camp brings a GeForce GTX 1060.

The case has an eye-catching bisected look thanks to a ton of open ventilation on the bottom half of the case, which also gives the optional blue LED lighting plenty of room to escape. The front of the case has an extensive loadout of connectors: two USB 2.0 ports and two USB 3.0 ports, one with PowerShare—letting users charge devices even when the system is powered down. There's also a USB 3.0 Type-C port and an SD card reader on the front. If you should choose to go with the A10 or A12 APU, you'll miss out on a few of those USB ports (and a whole lot of processing power). On the back, the system has a single motherboard-fed HDMI port, four more USB 3.0 ports, and two extra USB 2.0 connectors—plus the video outputs of whatever graphics card you end up choosing.

Dell has the system listed as "coming soon," but is promising a starting price of $599 for the most basic offering.

Dell is also drawing on AMD for powering the Inspiron 27 7000 and Inspiron 24 5000 all-in-one systems. As you might have guessed, the Inspiron 27 has a 27" screen, available with either 1080p or 4K resolution. You can spec the system with AMD Radeon RX 560 or 580 graphics cards and Ryzen CPUs including the Ryzen 3 1200, Ryzen 5 1400, and Ryzen 7 1700. Whatever the choice of processor, it can be paired with up to 16GB of DDR4 RAM. For storage purposes, buyers have the option of either 2.5" or M.2 SSDs, including PCIe offerings.

On the back, you'll find an HDMI in and HDMI out port, allowing you to plug in both a separate game console and a VR headset of your choice. There's also a single USB 3.0 Type-C port, two USB 3.0 ports (one with PowerShare), and two USB 2.0 connectors. The side of the system also has an SD card reader, audio jacks, and another USB 3.0 port with PowerShare. Pricing is set to start at $999.

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The Inspiron 24 5000 is focused on casual users but is nonetheless attractive. The body houses a 24" IPS touchscreen with 1920×1080 resolution. The whole machine and can be tilted down for convenience or mouse-free usage, too. Dell claims that streaming addicts can take advantage of system's SmartByte network prioritization tech. On the back, you'll find one HDMI port, a USB 3.0 Type-C port, three USB 3.0 ports, and two USB 2.0 ports. Again, two of those USB 3.0 ports offer PowerShare. The side panel has the same set of ports as the Inspiron 27.

The system offers a selection of seventh-generation AMD processors and unspecified Radeon graphics cards. Buyers can spec the system with up to 16 GB of RAM and a 1 TB hard drive. Dell says the baseline Inspiron 24 5000 will carry a pricetag of $699.

Comments closed
    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Seems fairly price competitive with a home build at the low end configs at least, not bad. The assumption accross the internet. You pay a small (150?) bit over a home build for saving time and having single source support, the kneejerk response to this on other parts of the internet seem to think it’s still 2007 where a home build would be hundreds less.

    Still a fan of building your own, but this is completely reasonable to save some time also.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, at the very lowest end the OEM models have always been price competitive with DIY, because they just have sourcing advantages you don’t get when you’re buying components in the ones and twos (though the components you buy in the ones and twos [i<]might[/i<] be higher quality). And that's especially true (or at least it was) if you're looking for something other than a standard tower case -- I bought a Dell Studio PC for my mother back in '10 because there was no way I could build an SFF system for the same price. I could build an SFF system with more powerful components at a much higher price, or I could build a SFF system with low-end components that was still more expensive. And when something went wrong and she called me (as happened when her HDD died) I just called Dell. If I had been trying to assemble a gaming system, there would have been no contest: DIY was and is the way to go. But at the bottom of the market, where it's purely a media consumption / web-browsing / email machine, it's hard to beat the big guys. (That said, my mother's machine is a hardcore gaming system: it's pretty much a dedicated Solitaire machine)

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 2 years ago

    The 27 model, and probably 24 also, have HDMI [i<]in[/i<] as well as out. Not a bad feature for something that looks like a monitor. Impressive to see 8 cores arrive in an AIO already.

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      I always loved that in my last AIO. Useful comp for medium usage and useful monitor when you need something heavier.

      • JosiahBradley
      • 2 years ago

      AIO does stand for AMD is Octocore.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    If you pair an RX 560 and VR display you’re gonna have a bad time, campers.

      • wingless
      • 2 years ago

      HAAAAAAhahahhaha yes you are!

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        I would have been a better idea to show that 27-incher tottering perilously on the edge of a tub while the user clumsily adjusts it. More realistic and favorable than VR.

    • wingless
    • 2 years ago

    I haven’t heard DELL and AMD in the same sentence in a long time.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      There’s a hot topic in the forum right now that uses them both in the same sentence!

        • morphine
        • 2 years ago

        Dell and AMD: SO HOT RIGHT NOW!

          • EzioAs
          • 2 years ago

          Woah woah, sounds like back porch stuff.

          • UberGerbil
          • 2 years ago

          [url=https://i0.wp.com/img.pandawhale.com/65402-zoolander-crazy-pills-gif-6laR.gif<]OMGATU![/url<]

      • raddude9
      • 2 years ago

      Well… not without the word “hates” somewhere in the same sentence.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, that’s one way to look at it.

        A more rational way is: Dell [b<]likes[/b<] profits. When AMD can produce a product that leads to Dell making a profit, they have no problem selling AMD parts. Might as well start asking probing questions about why Apple [b<]hates[/b<] Nvidia parts since you can't get an Nvidia product with any Apple system.

          • raddude9
          • 2 years ago

          I was refering to the long-running forum thread “Dell hates AMD”.

          I seem to remember that in the past AMD had some great products that were not taken up by Dell, now why was that again… Oh yea, illegal bribes.

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