Asus ROG debuts an all-AMD laptop with Ryzen 7 inside

Should you need eight CPU cores in a laptop for whatever reason, your only option until now was a machine even thicker and heavier than the fattest of gaming laptops. Fortunately for you—and for AMD fans all over the world—Asus ROG has developed a laptop powered by a Ryzen 7 eight-core CPU and a Radeon RX 580 graphics card. Meet the ROG Strix GL702ZC.

Of course, the specs above are the top configuration. Asus will also be selling the GL702ZC with Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 processors inside. As far as we can tell, the CPUs inside the laptop use the same silicon as their desktop counterparts—assuming they're not even exactly the same units. Asus does say that the GL702ZC is "practically a desktop under the hood," after all. The company makes no mention of alternative graphics hardware offerings, but we know the laptop will be available with up to 32GB of DDR4 memory at 2400 MT/s, NVMe SSDs up to 512GB, and a free 2.5" drive bay.

The 17.3" IPS matte-coated display will be available in 3840×2160 resolution with a 60Hz refresh rate, or 1920×1080 resolution with 75 Hz or 120 Hz refresh rates. All of the displays will have Freesync support, although the feature's benefits may be a little muted on the 60 Hz screens.

Packing all that hardware into a laptop would be impressive enough, but it's even more so given that the ROG Strix GL702ZC isn't a giant brick. It does use a 17.3" screen, which means the footprint isn't tiny. Still, it's only 1.3" thick and weighs less than 7 lbs (3.2 kg). Compared to other gaming laptops packing desktop-class hardware, that's downright svelte. If the ROG Strix GL702ZC looks like exactly what you need, Asus says you'll be able to pick one up "later this summer."

Comments closed
    • ptsant
    • 2 years ago

    I am really tempted to replace my MacBook Pro with a similar monster. Although portability will suffer a lot, I can always fall back on the MBP for long trips and the like. And having a linux system, I can simply synchronize across all my machines with rsync and just run the same code immediately. Plus I am now toying with Deep Learning applications which really need a GPU.

    I suspect the price tag will be obscene.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    So given how AMD hasn’t released mobile versions of Ryzen yet, do these laptops use Ryzen chips in AM4 sockets/packages?

      • ptsant
      • 2 years ago

      Bonus points if they are actually soldered down.

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    This looks to beat my [url=https://www.amazon.com/MSI-GE72-APACHE-235-NOTEBOOK-i7-4720HQ/dp/B012AQH9IW<]MSI GE72 APACHE-235 17.3"[/url<] which weighs a smidge over 6 pounds and if its for a similar price (I paid $999); I think they have a winner.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    It seems like a schizophrenic product:
    -If you want an octo-core monster workstation replacement, you probably don’t want a gaming GPU.
    -If you want a gaming machine and are willing to pay the R7 heat and cost premium, why not put that premium into a stronger gaming GPU (1070+) or CPU (mobile i7)?
    -If you want any sort of mobility, the lack of iGPU will turn you off

    It looks like this would be appealing in one of two scenarios:
    -You want pure AMD solutions, regardless of portability or strict performance
    -You want a cheap desktop replacement, and this ends up being cheaper than the Intel/NVidia option

    120Hz FreeSync looks fun, though. 120Hz + Adaptive Sync + 1080P IPS should be the defacto standard on these gaming SKUs. 3K/4K/5K screens are absolutely idiotic for this class of machine.

      • Philldoe
      • 2 years ago

      -Depending on the workload that 580 could do more than 8 CPU cores.
      -You can choose from any of the R3/5/7 chips so you can customize for your use case.
      -People don’t buy these to run off of the battery for any real lengths of time. They act as a desktop replacement than can be far more portable, and take up far less space than a desktop.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      I would hope this thing has an attractive price. IMHO the point of big fat desktop parts in a big fat laptop is because you don’t want to pay the low voltage and custom engineering premium. However I would not be surprised if the price was unjustifiably high.

      • ptsant
      • 2 years ago

      I suspect they get some sort of package deal from AMD to include the 580 with the r7/r5.

      But anyway, the 580 is an exceptional choice for the 1080p variant. The 4k variant would not be adequately served by anything else than a 1080 or 1080Ti, which is a complete joke in a notebook product. Putting the 1070 in there is too much for 1080p and not really enough for 4k, so it’s a sort of no-man’s land.

      The following configurations make some sense:
      r5 1600 + 580 + 1080p (gaming)
      r7 1700 + 580 + 4k (use the GPU for compute, creative applications and other OpenCL stuff)
      r7 + cheap GPU + 4k (workstation)

        • Mr Bill
        • 2 years ago

        +3 [quote<]I suspect they get some sort of package deal from AMD to include the 580 with the r7/r5. [/quote<]

    • Mat3
    • 2 years ago

    So the 580 is internal right? What’s the clock speed?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      Good question. Same concern regarding the CPU clocks. Asus says they’re not overclockable, so I’m curious to know how it runs.

    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    Only 3.2kg? My 2006 core 2 duo laptop with decidedly mobile components was about 3kg, and that thing was 100% plastic. I don’t see any mention of a battery, maybe it’ll just ship with a tiny one?

      • ImSpartacus
      • 2 years ago

      Usually they go for a 99 WHr battery, the biggest you can take on a plane.

      I can’t imagine them skimping on that with a glorified mobile desktop.

    • slowriot
    • 2 years ago

    Mildly interesting but I figure this will be kinda crap on battery life even when not gaming. There’s no low power iGPU for the system to call back to when not needing the RX580 as we see in most Intel-powered laptops.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      While battery life is generally pretty critical in notebooks, for a system like this that’s clearly not trying to be an ultrabook I’ll give it a pass.

        • slowriot
        • 2 years ago

        So what exact market do you think the 1050/1060/1070 equipped laptops that are all the rage and generally fit the same portability profile as this Asus laptop fit? Because those can get, generally, very good battery life thanks to Optimus.

        This market is the “do everything” market i.e. the biggest one. It needs to both game competently and provide a decent mobile/unplugged experience.

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          You see, I try to be nice about an AMD product and I still get hit.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<] This market is the "do everything" market i.e. the biggest one.[/quote<] Since when is the "gaming notebook" segment the biggest market? Note the huge ROG sticker on the display and the weird Stealth Bomber motif on the lid.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            I wouldn’t use its look to define its market, I think that’s just a TRism. Asus is going to be using this same motif, per the article, in configurations all the way down to a lowly Ryzen 3. If that doesn’t put this firmly into the budget/general market then what does? Is it entirely how you perceive the looks?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            Asus branded it as ROG. They’re aiming it at the gaming market. If they pair the Ryzen 3 configs with a GeForce MX 940, then maybe you’re right, but it would have no business being marketed as a gaming machine. It’s a reach to think these are being considered as anything else.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            I think you’re looking at this backwards. You’re using only the products looks to define its “market” instead of considering the product as a whole. When Asus takes this exact same core product and just puts a silver shell and their logo on it, it isn’t suddenly a product for an entirely new market. No, it’s just another option on the same market with different aesthetic approaches.

            The functionality is what determines its market, not its aesthetic.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            Does the manufacturer get to choose the intended market? I’m pretty sure Asus chose. And prices will more than likely follow. Prepare to be disappointed if you wanted a “do everything” PC for $1000.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah the model with a Ryzen 3 and whatever RX 5×0 that’s bottom tier are going to be well under $1000. Heck the R7 + RX580 model can’t be too deep in the $1000 territory or it truly has zero chance. There’s a lot of GTX1060 toting options, which again are likely to have much better battery life/thermals/noise levels at that price point.

            • RAGEPRO
            • 2 years ago

            If that were true then Hyundai wouldn’t sell exactly the same car as the Accent and the Veloster. Form determines market much more than function. See also the racks and racks of products painted pink and re-branded “for girls!”

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            I’d say that proves my point. The Veloster is in no way, shape or form a “sports” car. It’s just an aesthetically different take on the same basic car as before and largely appeals solely on that look. It doesn’t appeal to driving or car enthusiast because of this. It’s “core” is ordinary car, it’s aesthetic doesn’t make its market……..

            • RAGEPRO
            • 2 years ago

            Your argument is that battery life is important because this laptop is in the “do everything” market, right? That is, it will be someone’s primary PC and they will attempt to use it for note-taking in a classroom or for working at a coffee shop or in a conference room. Right?

            This is a gaming laptop, through and through. This machine has all of the qualifications of any ROG laptop, or MSI Gaming, or Eurocom Sky, or Razer Blade Pro, or any of those. Is battery life important in those laptops?

            Sure, ASUS will sell you one of these with slower hardware. Ford also sells Mustangs with four-cylinder engines. Does that mean the Mustang Cobra is less of a sports car?

            I guess I just don’t see the argument that this is an “everyman” laptop. It’s a ROG, and it uses desktop-class hardware. You could buy one with a Ryzen 3 and an RX 550 to carry around to class. You can also buy a Lotus Elise to carry your groceries in. I just don’t see the point.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            Seriously what in the world do you consider to be the “all” the qualification of an Asus ROG laptop? There are true DTR laptops and their are ultraportables in the ROG lineup. It’s a extremely wide range and really the only common themes among them is the branding.

            Do you think Razer puts the biggest battery they can legally in a Blade Pro because battery life doesn’t matter? Where is the disconnect for you?

            A R7+RX580 isn’t some kind of insane gaming beast. Calling it desktop class is also misleading because we’re in a era where nearly all the dedicated GPUs in a laptop carry that same moniker. It’s going to compete against GTX1060 equipped laptops at the top end which are available in real ultraportable laptops and those are “desktop class” GPUs too.

            I guess there’s the R7 CPU but I’d be very curious how it actually performs and maintains clocks in this application. Funny enough its probably worse for gaming because of how clock limited its likely to be.

            Wasn’t TR just going insane a bit ago over the Gigabyte Aero 15 because it packs a very similar level of hardware in a tight, portable, very long battery life package?

            All of this is again to say the only reason you narrowly define it as “gaming laptop” is the aesthetic. They put a silver shell and just a simple ASUS logo on it and now you’re talking an entirely different tune. A laptop like this, going against the Intel/Nvidia combo competition, has to do everything because the competition is already doing everything.

            The car analogies are also so silly. There’s tons of core changes to a Mustang to make it into one of the real performance models. The exterior isn’t what’s dictating if its a “sports” car or a “gaming” laptop. It’s the core inside. And in this case we’re talking about a laptop whose base spec (R3+RX540?) is very much “standard fare” and whose top specs is just a bit peppy. This thing is going to be something like $600-$1200.

            At that price point and performance level its going to have to compete against much more portable, long battery life Intel/Nvidia models. Just reality, that’s what’s on that market these days.

            • RAGEPRO
            • 2 years ago

            I mean, I don’t really see any refutation of my points here. If nothing else, it’s a gaming laptop because it has a Radeon RX 580 in it. It’s also a big giant laptop regardless of what you put in it. Also, Asus didn’t actually mention any other graphics options and an R3+RX 580 is still going to run games pretty darn well. A whole lot better than an i7-U and an 940MX.

            It looks to me like you just don’t like this laptop, and that’s fine. I’m not a big fan of it either; 17″ laptops are way too big IMO. Still, don’t tell me that battery life is the reason you don’t like it, because the (completely valid!) reason you don’t like it is that it’s probably overall “just worse” for gaming than a similarly-priced 15.6″ laptop with an i7-U and a GTX 1060 which still won’t have very good battery life. Battery life is just not a concern in this class of laptop.

            [edit]
            [quote<]Calling it desktop class is also misleading because we're in a era where nearly all the dedicated GPUs in a laptop carry that same moniker. It's going to compete against GTX1060 equipped laptops at the top end which are available in real ultraportable laptops and those are "desktop class" GPUs too.[/quote<]Sorry, "desktop-class" was an error; I meant "actual desktop hardware". "Desktop-class" laptop hardware [i<]isn't[/i<] most of the time. I have a laptop GTX 1070 here and it struggles to keep up with a desktop 1060 half the time. I don't doubt that this hardware in this ROG laptop will have the same problem, but if it doesn't, the "desktop-class" hardware in the ultraportables you're talking about will look real weak in comparison.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            I did address your points. Let’s go through this again though…

            My claim is that battery life does matter for this product. I will point to the fact that literally all of its competitors in the segment offer significantly longer potential battery life because of Optimus with an Intel/Nvidia combo vs the lack of such a solution here. The entire reason that tech came about in the first place is/was the desire to have usable battery life in a more gaming capable laptop.

            The primary reason a laptop like the Razer Blade Pro exists, and why Razer doesn’t make an extreme DTR replacement is because they’re targeting a market who want a large screen, a high but not extreme performance need, and a moderate degree of portability. MSI has their GS Stealth series, which includes 17″ models, that are their “thin and light gaming” laptops. The people buying those are expecting decently long battery life when not gaming on the battery and they get it because tons of room for battery and GPU switching tech. Asus has several similar models though they don’t seem to have an entire series like MSI. Gigabyte has a model that is also in this same exact vein.

            While I do agree there is a segment of laptops where battery life doesn’t matter. I will point out that segment is a another step (or even two) into the desktop-replacement direct i.e. the 2.0″ thick, 8.5lb+ units. This laptop is NOT a DTR. A realistic expectation for its performance is nowhere near that either. Which leads to…

            Addressing your “desktop class” versus “actual desktop hardware.” You’re playing semantics and hoping to win points on a miracle this laptop’s GPU will perform near its “actual” desktop counterpoint. Look at the damn thing, this laptop doesn’t have the cooling capacity for that. Even more ludicrous would be to expect the CPU to be at such a level. Simply put the laptop performance you’re pushing to represent this product isn’t going to match reality, and your performance expectation is only achievable in a real DTR form factor, which this laptop is not.

            See… earlier you tried to lump all the laptops in say the Asus ROG branding as sharing a similar set of qualities. But reality is again… the ROG lineup is extremely diverse and the only common factor is branding. You brought up the Razer Blade Pro as if it was proof this segment doesn’t care about battery life… a laptop with literally the biggest battery allowed on an airplane. If battery life wasn’t a concern they would have stuffed another GPU or more storage options inside but well… yeah battery life was a major factor in how they designed that product.

            And 100% I still feel if Asus had made this silver and just stuck a chrome ASUS logo on it with no ROG branding you’d look at it completely different even if it was at the core the same exact product. You’d suddenly accept that there’s some expectation of battery life because you wouldn’t be shoehorned into your “gaming laptop” definition. It’s hilarious in 2017 when nearly every “gaming” laptop also has pretty solid potential battery life.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            I want to see someone taking notes in class on a 17″ laptop.

            • Mr Bill
            • 2 years ago

            I’ll bet AMD gave them a better price on the CPU and GPU if they paired them together in the same system.

      • Philldoe
      • 2 years ago

      People who buy these don’t care about battery time and will never run them on battery. To the people buying this, it’s a desktop that can be easily moved around and does not require the space an actual desktop does.

        • slowriot
        • 2 years ago

        That’s just not true at all. They even clearly targeted a thinner profile to make it more portable. A large portion of this laptops target audience is likely students who want something they can plug in and game on but also will run off the battery for several hours no issue while in class. Virtually all the similarly sized Intel/Geforce combo laptops in this segment can easily do those multiple hour times thanks to Optimus.

        If you’re looking for a laptop you’re literally just keep plugged in there are much better options.

          • Anovoca
          • 2 years ago

          I would wait for an official price to come out on this, but I doubt this laptop is in a student’s budget. For people with your use case, they will just have to wait for the Ryzen APU laptop which will likely be out before next school year starts anyways.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            Maybe its just a US thing but students here will spend thousands on Macbooks and iPhones all day long without even blinking (because its not “their” money be it parents, a loan, or some other source). Dell XPS units are also very common. Who do you really think is the single demographic buys the largest portion of Alienwares? I’d bet students or its real, real close. Why do all these companies try to time their releases for the back to school season?

            Why does every laptop maker have a 1050/1060/1070 equipped laptop that also competes in this exact market? Lots of them. MSI and Asus might have a dozen a piece just in that sector because its big for them.

            • Anovoca
            • 2 years ago

            yep, and I was one of those students. Three weeks after I got my gaming laptop I turned around and bought a Surface. No matter what, it just wasn’t the best tool for the job. All the optimization in the world wasn’t going to give it the battery life I really needed for a full day of classes and all the dead-lifts in the gym weren’t going to make hauling it around on my back any less tiresome.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            So now its the form factor? But you were just telling me it was a potential price issue.

            • Anovoca
            • 2 years ago

            I am saying if you have $3000 of disposable cash as a student to throw at a gaming laptop, you can probably fork over an additional 300 for a windows convertible tablet and get 10x the battery life for 1/3 the weight of even the most economical ultrabook.

          • Philldoe
          • 2 years ago

          They didn’t go to great lengths to thin out the laptop. It’s not any thinner than my old Asus G75 Gaming laptop. I really think you missed the mark there.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            What? This laptop is thickest of 1.3″ and the model you mention is 2.0″. This also weighs about a pound less. Those are significant differences. They reserve chassis like that G75 for GTX1070/1080SLI builds these days. EDIT: It seems its actually about 2lbs less weight.

            • Philldoe
            • 2 years ago

            My G75VW was made in 2012 and has a 660m.

            • slowriot
            • 2 years ago

            You claimed this is not any thinner. When its significantly thinner (1.3″ vs 2.0″) AND it also weighs nearly 2lbs less. Just own to being wrong…

      • brucethemoose
      • 2 years ago

      Big GPUs idle with alot less power than they used to. I wouldn’t be surprised if this thing got decent (not good) browsing and screen off battery life.

        • Amiga500+
        • 2 years ago

        Indeed.

        I’d reckon displaying up 2D (or video) won’t take much juice either.

        It’ll not go 10 hours. But should be good for 3-4 on none 3D graphics or heavy workload use. That is enough for remote office work off the plug while retaining the ability to do some medium lifting on-plug.

        e.g. Engineer going to visit a client for 2 days, logging data off-plug (either outdoors or in a test house) the first day then doing some number crunching that evening/overnight before presenting to the same client the next day.

      • ptsant
      • 2 years ago

      Polaris uses very little power at idle, which is what these systems do most of the time.

      If you think about gaming, it’s either going to be … short (if on battery) or impossible (if on a laptop with a crappy iGPU).

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