In Win wood like to show you its 806 and Cube A1

PC chassis designer In Win can usually be counted on to provide creative cases, like last December's X-Frame 2.0 or the circular robot-and-PC hybrid that's currently snapping pictures of Computex attendees. With its In Win 806 and Gaming Cube A1 designs, the company is standing out from the crowd with an unusual building material: wood.

Even the 806's large tempered glass side panel can't quite steal the attention from the wood panel that wraps around the front and top portions of the chassis. It's an ATX case, so that's a decent amount of material there, and the wooden surface is only broken by two screws on the bottom front and a metal I/O panel on the top. There's a bit of space between the wood panel and the body of the case, allowing for fan mounts on the front and top panels in addition to the back and bottom. PCGamer reports that In Win is debuting a new mounting system for tempered glass side panel, too. The system uses a pair of plastic knobs that snap into place, rather than the usual thumbscrews.

In Win's Gaming Cube A1 doesn't take the wooden concept quite as far as the 806, using a single flat piece of wood as an accent on the top panel. It's a Mini-ITX case limited to SFX power supplies, but its diminutive size will likely help it find a home on top of desks rather than hidden underneath them. Clear acrylic at the bottom of the chassis and some LED light strips give the impression that the case is floating. Air intake is provided by two 120-mm fans on the bottom of the case, and air is exhausted through one fan on the back panel and another on the right side next to honeycomb-shaped cutouts.

In Win hasn't released pricing and availability information for either of these cases. The company teased on Twitter that European buyers should be able to grab a Gaming Cube A1 sometime in June, though.

Comments closed
    • bfar
    • 2 years ago

    Hey that 806 actually looks really well

    • kvndoom
    • 2 years ago

    If I were building a rig this year I’d put that ATX tower at the top of my list, assuming it’s not going to cost a small fortune.

    • oldog
    • 2 years ago

    Charles and Ray Eames would be proud of that 806.

    Mid-century modern PC cases; who’d a thunk it?

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    I cut myself in enough stupid ways during builds to add splinters to the list!

    • Wirko
    • 2 years ago

    These two cases are targeting the TR [s<]reader[/s<]gerbilship specifically. How can I tell? [url=https://techreport.com/news/31739/dell-up3017q-oled-monitor-now-available-for-3499?post=1031685<]Here's how[/url<].

    • TravelMug
    • 2 years ago

    I automatically read the title of this news post in my head in the voice of Dmitry Novoselov 🙂

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    The 806 perfectly matches my sensibilities of modern design with natural elements. I really like it.

    • morphine
    • 2 years ago

    Just for the record, here are a few rejected headlines for this piece:

    In Win’s latest cases lay the wood on the competition
    In Win gives me wood
    Woodpeckers get wood for In Win wood cases
    If a woodchuck could chuck wood, he’d chuck an In Win wood case
    Wood you get an In Win case?
    In Win gives us wood with its 806 and Cube A1 cases

    The respective staff authors shall remain nameless. For now.

      • Anovoca
      • 2 years ago

      Nice, but tbh I miss all the butt hurt from last year’s click-bait themed headlines.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Just for fun, I came up with a couple more:

      In Win’s 806 and Cube A1 cases time travel back to the 70s
      Building a PC in In Win’s new cases won’t be a birch
      Buying In Win’s 801 and Cube A1 will surely make you go br-oak
      These photos of In Win’s new cases will have you pining
      In Win sticks its wood into the 806 and Cube A1 cases

        • Anovoca
        • 2 years ago

        In Wins 806, for a build you can finish.

          • deruberhanyok
          • 2 years ago

          Subtle. Wood if I could give more than +1.

          • morphine
          • 2 years ago

          That’s a pretty good one. Have three internet cookies.

      • Kougar
      • 2 years ago

      In Win 806 and Cube A1, for when you need to polish some wood

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      In Win’s Gaming Cube A1 with the butcher block top would be handy in the kitchen for chopping onions and peppers while googling the recipe.

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      Something To Grind Your Teeth On, Gerbils!

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      In Win wood, The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    “Weird” is kind of In Win’s thing. These cases certainly bring the weird.

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      Joking aside, say what you will, but at least In Win is doing new stuff instead of just cramming more LEDs and tempered glass sheets.

      And I daresay that these two cases look pretty classy.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Those cases would fit my decor pretty well, if I stripped out the LED vajazzle.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Indeed. No complaints here. And I agree that they look nice. Just…kinda weird.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 2 years ago

    In Win is giving me wood with these cases.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    No thanks.
    My systems have enough bugs in them already without adding termites to the list.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      Fine, dad, have an upvote.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 2 years ago

    The breadbox case is nice, the plywood one… Well, I hope that level of finish is only for the prototype and the final one is better.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      They could add some edge banding to cover the lamination pretty easily. I wonder if the panels on the ATX case are thicker than the mini ITX case, because there’s not much reason to use a laminated panel there unless it’s thick enough to make forming the bends difficult.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      Some people like the unique color banding you get from staining and finishing the rough plywood edge. As long as it’s got a nice polymer or epoxy seal, it could sell like that.

    • raddude9
    • 2 years ago
      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      So is glass. If you’re relying on the body of the case to radiate a significant amount of heat, rather than just guide the air that is transporting it, you might want to check inside — all the plastic parts are likely starting to soften.

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      It is, but air is an even better insulator. Without a few heat pipes or some other way to transfer the heat directly it’s not going to matter much what materials are used for the walls of the case its self.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      Srsly? That’s the comment you’re going with?

      Ok, bro.

        • raddude9
        • 2 years ago
          • UberGerbil
          • 2 years ago

          Other than weight, it’s not clear to me how wood is significantly less practical than metal. It’s more practical than glass in a lot of ways (you can buff out scratches, for example) but nobody seems to have a problem with glass being “impractical” for cases.

            • raddude9
            • 2 years ago
            • MrJP
            • 2 years ago

            Unless your case is massively hot inside, heat transfer by radiation will be minuscule compared to the convective heat transfer from the airflow through the case.

            • raddude9
            • 2 years ago
            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            Black body radiation from a case that is (intentionally) physically isolated from the components inside is a rounding error in the grand scheme of cooling.

            Any difference that might be measurable could be drowned out by something as minor as moving some cables an inch or two to let a little more air flow over the parts that need it.

            • raddude9
            • 2 years ago
            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            That sounds like the same justification that was given years ago for why you should buy an aluminum case instead of one made from steel, but it doesn’t really work that way. Unless something very bad and wrong is going on inside the case there’s not going to be any significant difference.

            • raddude9
            • 2 years ago
            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Dude, this thread died like nearly two weeks ago. Without the notification email I never would have even known you replied here. Are you trying to be like [url=https://xkcd.com/386/<]this guy[/url<]?

            • UberGerbil
            • 2 years ago

            Again: is your case warm to the touch? If so, you might want to check on the components inside because you’ve got an inferno in there. Properly configured, any system should be cooled by airflow (or liquid, though ultimately that goes to a radiator). If the airflow is so poor the case is radiating heat and thus a significant part of the cooling solution, you don’t have a cooling solution. You have a problem.

            • raddude9
            • 2 years ago
      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Looks like plenty of sucker and exhaust fans, like most cases. The case sides are never a big factor in heat exchange, air exchange is.

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      Indeed it is but still … a wooden CPU heatsink would look sooo classy, why isn’t anyone manufacturing them?

        • Redocbew
        • 2 years ago

        Plus it’d give you the cozy smell of a wood-burning fireplace with a little overclocking.

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        Ask LTT to make one 😛
        [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vL72lQ6dRZU[/url<]

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        From what I’ve heard, Intel is going pure mahogany in all future heatspreaders since metal is just too early-2000s.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      IF WOOD WAS AN INSULATOR THEN THEY WOULDN’T BE VERY COOL WOULD THEY

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