AMD and Newegg drop prices on Ryzen 7 CPUs

We've been big fans of AMD's Ryzen 7 CPUs for tasks that can take advantage of more than four hardware threads since day one. The CPUs deliver great bang-for-the-buck in productivity applications, and the software patches from AMD and game developers are helping increase performance little by little. The other thing that helps improve price to performance ratio is a price drop, and Newegg has one of those in store for Ryzen chips as well.

The Ryzen 7 1700 is getting a $15 haircut from $329 down to $315, the Ryzen 7 1700X is dropping to $350 from $399, and the range-topping Ryzen 7 1800X comes down to $460 from an initial $500 asking price. All three chips have eight cores with simultaneous multi-threading for a grand total of 16 hardware threads, and all three pack AMD's XFR self-overclocking feature. The Ryzen 7 1700 has a 3.0 GHz base clock and a 3.7 GHz boost clock, the Ryzen 7 1700X goes from 3.4 GHz to a 3.8 GHz boost clock rate, and the Ryzen 7 1800X pumps up from 3.6 GHz to 4.0 GHz.

If you've just been waiting for a price drop to put together a Ryzen system of your very own, today just might be the day you've been waiting for, particularly if you've had your eye on the Ryzen 7 1700X. Take a look at our latest system guide before clicking the buy button over at Newegg. Make sure to grab an AM4-compatible cooler for the Ryzen 7 1700X or 1800X. The Ryzen 7 1700 comes with one of AMD's Wraith Spire coolers in the box. Thanks to TechPowerUp for the heads-up on price drops. The new lower prices may or may not be permanent, but Newegg's product pages do not include any remarks about sale or promotional pricing.

Comments closed
    • chuckula
    • 4 years ago

    For reference to future historians: AMD ended up denying that they were the source of the price cut.

    [url<]http://www.pcworld.com/article/3200040/computers/no-amd-didnt-slash-ryzen-prices-ahead-of-threadripper-launch.html[/url<]

    • AMDisDEC
    • 4 years ago

    Did you catch AMD’s Computex Presentation?
    Absolutely awesome!

    This must be the most structured and product focused presentation in AMD’s long history.

    Lisa Su is a pure GENIUS!
    She led the entire presentation which included AMD Zen and Vega based products, ecosystem partner presentations with CEOs and VPs of Dell, HP, and Asus onstage to highlight their new AMD based desktops, Laptops and subs.
    In the past many of AMD’s major partners got burned by past CEOs because of their bad habit of EOL’ing products. Products that partners had designed around and were left with no choice but to EOL those products.
    Lisa Su is not like those past AMD CEOs.
    She is a genius who knows how to steer competitive market products and plan outward to enable future product smooth transitions which greatly assist AMD partners.

    Dell Loves AMD again!

      • K-L-Waster
      • 4 years ago

      Do you really need to post love letters to Lisa Su in every AMD article?

        • chuckula
        • 4 years ago

        And people say I attack anybody who likes AMD.
        I can’t get enough of this guy!

        • AMDisDEC
        • 4 years ago

        How can you not?

    • beck2448
    • 4 years ago

    It’s not complicated. It’s called supply and demand.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 4 years ago

    covfefe AMD?

    • yeeeeman
    • 4 years ago

    They probably have a number of reasons for which they dropped prices. First of all, they don’t sell as many CPUs as expected because people are not used to paying 500 bucks on an AMD CPU yet. The name that they have built for themselves in the past few years didn’t help with this at all.
    Still, there is always a good side of things and I think the HEDT platform could do just that, change the way people look at AMD and make them understand that AMD is still capable of delivering top-notch performance no matter the price. They already do that with the 1800X which is a gem of a CPU, but people are so used to the fact that AMD is the underdog and <insert Bulldozer experience here> that they cannot see anything besides Intel. Much like Apple fans cannot see anything beside those stupid expensive phones.
    In the one, the most plausible reason is a combination of people’s belief related to AMD products but also adjustments done for the HEDT line-up to start at ~500 bucks.

      • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
      • 4 years ago

      It’s possible the initial price was set to generate a perception of value in potential buyers, with the price drop meant to push them over the edge to make a sale, now that they have sufficient quantities in stock.

      I’m not saying that’s how it is, but this is part of the marketing 101 textbook. AMD has to release sales figures eventually, until then we won’t know.

        • kn00tcn
        • 4 years ago

        it’s pretty weird when the chips are identical & ‘overclock’ the same, 1700x & 1800x are hard choices with 1700 sitting right there

    • AMDisDEC
    • 4 years ago

    Lisa Su is America’s Gem and the ideal role model for how a female (or Male) CEO should perform.
    She’s moving crates to make room for the newer products.
    I can’t wait for the Threadripper to hit the market, drop in price for the newer Workstation EPYC.
    Genius!

    • UberGerbil
    • 4 years ago

    As I’ve been saying for over a decade: [i<]Intel drops prices when it wants to; AMD drops prices because it has to.[/i<]

    • sophisticles
    • 4 years ago

    They have also been dropping in price at Microcenter, they 1600 for $200 and you can get $50 off any supporting MB; they had a $65 Gigabyte that you could bundle with the Ryzen for a final MB cost of just $15.

    The sad thing is that even with the price drops Ryzen’s are just not worth the money, yeah they have competitive performance in well threaded apps, but over-all performance leaves a lot to be desired and the truth of the matter is that AMD is about to get it’s hat handed to them by Coffee Lake.

    According to some recent tests using Macs’ powered by Coffee Lake cpu’s, Intel’s new chips are said to be 30% faster than the Kaby Lakes they replace:

    [url<]https://www.macrumors.com/2017/05/30/intel-coffee-lake-30-pct-performance-boost/[/url<] If this turns out to be true, a quad core CL will be 30% faster than a quad core KL, which would make the quad core CL's faster than Ryzen in most benchmarks and the 6 core CL should absolutely smoke the 1800X. So why would one buy any AMD based system when in a couple of months Intel will lay the smack down on AMD once again?

      • raddude9
      • 4 years ago
        • sophisticles
        • 4 years ago

        I have a slightly different take, if a CL is 30% faster than a KL in a fixed 15W power envelope, then I would expect it to be 30% faster in a fixed 65W, 77W, 95W, 140W power envelope; now if that 30% comes due to IPC improvements or because Intel is able to clock CL 30% within the same power envelope, I really don’t care.

        Faster at the same power envelope is faster.

          • raddude9
          • 4 years ago
          • synthtel2
          • 4 years ago

          It’s a whole lot easier to go from 3.0 to 3.9 than from 4.0 to 5.2.

          • kn00tcn
          • 4 years ago

          that’s not how power envelopes work, more specifically we can see with ryzen how the performance per watt starts dropping at ‘exactly’ 3.6ghz onward & again even worse at 3.8ghz onward

          i’m certainly quite interested in low power improvements, but they dont always translate to high power or vice versa

          CL vs KL in particular we need to know clockspeeds as KL vs SL has shown: KL ‘improved’ stock mhz, but overclock a SL to KL speed & they’re ‘the same’ with i’m not sure how much watt difference…

          desktop watts arent as stringent anyway, especially when overclocked, so we dont get the literal improvement, particularly if the two generations end up with a similar max overclock, so the important question is how much the architecture is improving at a fixed clockspeed (it’s nice how we can currently use something like 3.5ghz for so many generations to compare them directly)

      • kn00tcn
      • 4 years ago

      you can put that last question another way though… what about the intel people that already bought, they’re not going to buy intel again in a couple months, arent they satisfied? similar situation with amd unless we somehow end up with multiple important games permanently dipping below 60fps at 4ghz ryzen

    • Unknown-Error
    • 4 years ago

    R7 1800X/1700X were overpriced IMHO. 1700 was about right. The best priced AMD CPUs are the R5 series. The TR gaming chart plot distribution showed this quite clearly.

    • ptsant
    • 4 years ago

    Funny, just yesterday I predicted that the 1800X would slide to $450 to allow room for a more competitive Threadripper at ~$520. I expect the 12core to be very aggressively priced.

    On the other hand, the ripper platform will surely be expensive. Quad channel has that I guess…

    • blazer_123
    • 4 years ago

    Good to see the price drop. I recently bought the Ryzen 1700 for the same price — but that was with a promo deal. Presumably, new promos will come out with even better deals.

    The real benefit is in the 1700X and 1800X. A $50 and $60 price drop is excellent.

    For prospective Ryzen buyers: There are still a ton of teething issues when it comes to chipsets. I bought a B350 board and the southbridge was faulty. It turned out this was a common problem (that, by 5/15, had still not been fixed via BIOS updates). It looks like these are software issues rather than hardware. Still, if a motherboard doesn’t work, it doesn’t work. It’s small comfort to early adopters that the problem will be fixed shortly.

    The other big issue is RAM. BIOS updates are slowly but surely rolling out allowing higher clocked RAM.

      • Tirk
      • 4 years ago

      I recently got a 1700 as well, luckily Fry’s had $50 off promo so it was cheaper than the new retail price 🙂 Made it close enough to the 1600/x that it seemed well worth getting it over them.

      As for motherboard and memory I got the Asrock Taichi and Gskill Flare X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4 3200. I highly recommend that combo if you want the best chance at a no fuss plug and play experience. The ram worked flawlessly using the XMP profile and has good timings @3200 as well, 14-14-14-34. The ram was on the higher to medium cost but the MB is one of the cheapest X370 boards out their but has some of the best reviews. I don’t think ram speeds are a big issue like they were when Ryzen first released but like always DO YOUR RESEARCH!

      I had no teething issues at all getting everything to work right. In fact it was probably one of the smoothest installs that I can recollect doing. If you’re buying a Ryzen system now then I think as long as you do your research you can get very good results without the headache.

        • Tirk
        • 4 years ago

        Ah random down thumbs on a post that wasn’t attacking anyone.

        BTW the Taichi board also supports running ECC ram for those of you interested in using ECC ram.

        • blazer_123
        • 4 years ago

        I’m glad you got a good board. I did a ton of research prior to buying this. I wanted to go with AMD but knew that Intel was the more established platform. I took a chance and lost as a result. My new board works great.

        I’m not the only one. If you go on certain forums you will see people running into the same issue. Even after exhaustive mobo, ram, etc replacements, they still fail to remain stable under stress testing. It’s remarkable how extensive this is.

        For the casual buyer: The RAM issue was a major problem. You shouldn’t need to look up your RAM to be able to use it — that’s why we have uniform standards like DDR4 in the first place. (note: I did make sure my Corsair DIMMs were compatible —- both on their approved list and through reviews).

        For the person who does their research: there is no fixing an inherent problem with the chipset. You are stuck with it and that’s just not acceptable.

        I’m glad yours worked but you don’t see Intel facing the same teething problems. Not with an established line of products.

          • kn00tcn
          • 4 years ago

          well technically ddr4 is standard, 2600 & below is officially supported, so it’s not like you get unusable broken ram

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      If I absolutely had to buy these days I’d totally hate how AM4 boards still have quite a number of rough edges. I’m sure many folks would be ok with that but I’d really much rather get a polished platform. That said, I think the AM4 motherboard issues we’re seeing are deterring many people from buying. It’s just a good thing I really don’t have any plans to upgrade yet so I can sit back and wait for Ryzen 2 or 3 and the next wave of AM4 motherboards.

        • Tirk
        • 4 years ago

        At this point I’m not seeing the rough edges that came out on release. I had zero issues with the AM4 board I got and everything works. Is there some other criteria I should be looking for?

        I’m not sure which exact board blazer_123 got because he doesn’t say. Its unfortunate he chose a motherboard that doesn’t work well but I know for a fact that there are good ones out there because I have one. One would hope that no matter what motherboard brand you buy that you would always get a good experience, unfortunately that is not the case for any platform.

          • DoomGuy64
          • 4 years ago

          The ASRock Taichi board seems to be considered the best by general consensus. Asus is in that arena too, but damn do not install their custom drivers or software. If I would have know about that beforehand, (good job reviewers not looking out for the consumer), I would have went ASRock. Asus still works fine provided you avoid their unnecessary software.

            • blazer_123
            • 4 years ago

            This is a problem that has been noticed across almost the entire B350 + X370 series.

            [url<]https://forums.overclockers.co.uk/threads/am4-b350-x370-black-screen-crash-thread.18772316/[/url<] The BIOS updates since this thread was done have still not fixed the underlying problem. I was using the Asrock AM4 Pro. The same black screen problem (where it boots fine but then will black screen) is inherent on almost every board. No offense to Tirk, but just because your board works doesn't mean others will. Likewise, I find it irritating when one person's board/cpu is bad and they blame the entire line. This is why quality control exists. It's clear that AMD still hasn't fixed all the problems that exist with the AM4 platform. I'm still happy I bought the 1700 but at this time the i7-7700k is the safer choice. For gaming, they are essentially a wash. It's only when you get into heavily multi-threaded software that the Ryzen really shines.

            • Tirk
            • 4 years ago

            No offense taken, thank you for the respectful reply 🙂

            Thinking about what you said, I should concede that my experience is not 100% guaranteed.

            I just felt that it was important to emphasize that not everyone will have problems with the AM4 platform. And that there are enough reviews out at this point to pickup boards and ram that will give the best possible chance of having no problems. It is frustrating that motherboard makers probably spend much less effort on quality control for the AMD platforms due to their market share. Seems like a catch 22 for AMD, some users believe all boards for AMD cpus are rubbish and AMD probably can’t get motherboard makers to do more quality control until it can convince the Intel mind share that their platform is competitive and to buy and increase AMD’s market share.

            I agree in the immediate future the i7-7700k is a more established platform but looking ahead the 1700 seems to have a lot of potential longevity in application performance over the i7-7700k.

            • Tirk
            • 4 years ago

            Yeah that’s why I got the Taichi, seems to have the best all rounded price/performance/features/reliability. I’m sure someone might have the bad luck in getting a lemon Taichi board but overall I’m happy to recommend others to consider getting it.

          • terranup16
          • 4 years ago

          I’ve been using release UEFI on my Asus X370 Prime and my Corsair RAM is running at 2933MHz instead of 3200MHz (I made sure it was a model that had a good shot of working, but it’s an XMP-based model rather than native AMD ala the FlareX or Fortis line), but that’s the only issue I’ve had at all. Everything else has just worked. I’m waiting for Asus’s implementation of the AGESA 1.06 UEFI and when that comes out I’ll give that a whirl and see if I can hit 3200MHz on the RAM. But I don’t really feel like it’s needed.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 4 years ago

            The current official bios update will already get you 3200, while the unreleased or beta 1.06 bios will allow higher than 3200. If you want 3200, you don’t need to wait because that’s already been taken care of, as well as some other fixes.

            XMP is fine. The issue is that you need to use single rank dimms with no more than two sticks to reach maximum speed. 4 dimms will not work, and neither will two stick dual rank. Officially. I have heard some people getting 3200 out of high end
            16×2 kits, but there’s a lot of variables to match to get the same result. Oh, and XMP settings need to be set via DOCP or whatever asus/amd calls XMP compatibility. Auto will kinda work too, but your timings will likely be generic.

            The ram issue overview:
            [url<]http://www.legitreviews.com/amd-ryzen-single-rank-versus-dual-rank-ddr4-memory-performance_192960[/url<] It's a murky issue mostly because people aren't properly informed about what rank dimm they are using, 4 dimm limitations, and properly updating their bios. If you can't get 3200, update your bios. Chances are that's all you need.

      • kn00tcn
      • 4 years ago

      i’m still not understanding what the issue was, some sort of blank screen after boot when using pcie cards? which card?

      if it was software, then how would the chipset be faulty?

    • ermo
    • 4 years ago

    Could someone with industry experience give an estimate for when we can expect process tweaks resulting in respun silicon revisions with a +200-300 MHz clockspeed advantage at the same voltage?

    In comparison to the competition, such a tweak would IMO make more sense for the R5 1600X + R7 SKUs at the new price point in this article.

      • DancinJack
      • 4 years ago

      Roughly a year from first spin.

        • ermo
        • 4 years ago

        Rumour has it that Zen 2 will reach GA early 2018.

        So I guess it doesn’t make much sense to expect tweaked Zen 1 silicon, since that would be ready roughly around the rumoured Zen 2 (Pinnacle Ridge) release?

        Given that Zen 1 is 128bit AVX and won’t clock higher than around 4GHz on air, I figure my 4.5GHz i7 3770k should tide me over just fine in games until Zen 2 lands.

        Besides, the motherboards and their firmware should be a lot more stable around then.

          • cegras
          • 4 years ago

          Although amd may not change their product specifications, the same chip may consume less power and have more overclocking headroom over time.

            • smilingcrow
            • 4 years ago

            They used to change the product ID when they used a different chip stepping in the past even if the product name stayed the same if my memory serves me well.

    • Zizy
    • 4 years ago

    1800X is still way overpriced. 110$ (~30%) extra gives you measly 200MHz (~5%)?
    Guess its point is to be a halo part nobody actually buys or cares about so they can save good chips for the Threadripper and Epyc.

    Anyway, G4560 + R5 1600 are making entire other AMD and Intel consumer lineup quite niche at best.

    • Kretschmer
    • 4 years ago

    This reminds me of the NVidia Founder’s Edition Releases: Soak the early adopters for a bit extra, then go for more volume with cheaper SKUs. I wouldn’t read very much into the price change.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 4 years ago

      I think you’ve offered the best explanation. AMD isn’t dropping prices in a panic, but they figure they’ve gotten the easy sales. (No doubt the sales curve has fallen off a bit.)

    • K-L-Waster
    • 4 years ago

    Unless I’m misremembering, it doesn’t look like they’ve dropped prices in Canada. Oh well….

      • tipoo
      • 4 years ago

      No one loves us 🙁

      I wonder what alternate reality still-Canadian ATI looks like in 2017.

    • jokinin
    • 4 years ago

    Come on AMD, give me a cheaper and faster Ryzen 1600X and I will finally have a reason to upgrade my ancient i5 3550.

      • kn00tcn
      • 4 years ago

      not sure if you’re simply asking for a 4+ghz 6core

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Unless your only activity is playing games or you insist on Intel chipsets I think there’s just no reason to pick the 7700K over the 1700X when there’s only like $20 or so separating them. Anyone buying the 1700X instead of the 7700K must be deeply satisfied that they got a far more robust processor. It’s really the far better choice.

    AMD really is out for blood, aren’t they?

    Edit – just want to add something. I do admit that I’m going for the Ryzen because I’m looking at its advantage over Intel in terms of aggregate performance. Admittedly that’s not the best way to choose a CPU too because it should be based on what things you wanna do with it. But I find it noteworthy how people keep saying, back when Ryzen wasn’t out yet and AMD insisted more cores is the future of computing with the FX, that they don’t need more cores and FX sucks. While that is still very true today, it seems people suddenly say more cores is the future just because Ryzen offers more real cores this time and their per-thread / per-core performance is quite competitive already. In a sense people have suddenly turned 180° just because Ryzen gives you more cores and now they’re not just wimpy cores like the FX had.

      • Pancake
      • 4 years ago

      Stand back and look at the economics of it. This move could be for two plausible reasons.

      Firstly, AMD simply aren’t moving as much product as they hoped for. The price is perceived to be too high and they ain’t selling. So the calculation is that they sell more units but at reduced margins. Will that increase net profit? It’s a risky strategy that hasn’t worked well for them in the past (both CPU and graphics).

      Secondly, they could be trying to increase market share for whatever reason – get more developer support, mindshare etc.

      The net result is the same but the motives are different. But AMD being out for blood? No, not really. It’s more that they’re bleeding themselves dry. Again.

        • Hsldn
        • 4 years ago

        Server chips are much more important than desktop chips.

        Also i dont think they disnt plan a discount, intel was obviously going to respond.

          • Pancake
          • 4 years ago

          Servers are a different market and hence are irrelevant to current discussion. We also have no pricing on AMD server parts so it would be pure speculation. But why not speculate? It’s the lifeblood of forums, no?

          AMD have basically zero marketshare and hence revenue in the server space so things can only improve for them. But the server space is particularly conservative and cautious with good reason – your business depends on it. I myself have two Intel servers and there’s just no way in hell I would switch to AMD until they prove themselves. Let others find out if there are problems with reliability, drivers, support etc. It’s going to take them years to get tier one vendor support and marketing to even creep into the double digits ie. AMD are utterly dependent on client side computing for their short to medium term revenue. To get there they will unfortunately for them have to follow the same strategy as Ryzen – price them low and take much smaller margins per unit than Intel. That gotta hurt.

            • Spunjji
            • 4 years ago

            Why do you think it’s going to take years for Tier 1 vendor support? It’s absolutely in the best interest of organisations like HP to get their AMD server lines moving again. Aside from the flexibility that dual-sourcing gives them in negotiating with Intel, it also opens up interesting areas that Intel currently won’t touch (e.g. low-cost many-cores VM / Virtualised Storage boxes that don’t have weirdly gimped feature sets).

            Much smaller margins than Intel also doesn’t necessarily have to hurt given the scale of margins Intel extract from these areas.

            That’s aside from the fact that their architecture is strongest in the kind of software that servers run. They won’t really /need/ to drop their pants here like they have had to client-side.

        • djand77
        • 4 years ago

        Pancake, not at all. AMD is lowering prices to make room for the Threadripper 12c/24t cpu at around $500. It is also believed that AMD is producing 8-core Ryzen chips with about an 80% pass rate for all 8 cores. Not as much part binning required.

          • helix
          • 4 years ago

          If what you say about 80% good 4+4 core chips is true then this is my take on the business:
          I suspect AMD put enough air in the pricing charts to secure themselves against bad yields. If yields now have turned out good, then they can sell a good CPU for more money by not killing a perfectly good core, provided there is a buyer for it.
          Intel without meaningful competition played a zero-sum game where one product would eat into another. AMD is not in that position. So they are trying to up-sell R5 buyers to an R7.

      • Kretschmer
      • 4 years ago

      I recently built on a 7700K and wouldn’t trade it in for a 1700X if I could:
      -My only strenuous applications are games. 7700K will get me to my monitors native refresh rate at 100FPS, while the 1700X would leave some of that GPU performance on the table (as low as ~60 FPS per the TR review)
      -Mature platform without teething issues
      -The world won’t become magically fully parallel just because AMD is throwing cores at the wall

      If anything, the 7700K should be the default with users opting for the 1700X if they anticipate highly threaded/niche workloads.

        • Krogoth
        • 4 years ago

        7700K is a niche in itself which only makes sense if you want the highest turbo clock and base clock speed and don’t care for overclocking. Its lesser brethren are almost as fast as mainstream/gaming usage patterns for $100 less or more.

          • Kretschmer
          • 4 years ago

          Sorry, which other i7 can you overclock?

      • srg86
      • 4 years ago

      I want a fast CPU with integrated graphics (since I don’t play games). My ideal CPU would actually be something with 8 cores and an iGPU.

      Still it is great that competition is back. At least I can say “I like X because I’ve had better experiences with them” to “I like X because they’re the only game in town” for example. At least having the choice is good.

      I really wouldn’t consider this out for blood, more “we’re finally level now”

      • blastdoor
      • 4 years ago

      It’s more accurate to say “Unless your [b<]primary CPU-intensive[/b<] activity is playing games..." Most people don't need a lot of CPU power. Among those who do, most of them primarily use it to play games. So actually, the 7700K addresses a larger market segment than Ryzen. For me personally, Ryzen is more appealing because I can fully utilize all the threads. But I'm realistic enough to understand that I'm in the minority.

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        In a sense it’s not so different from the days of Thuban and FX. AMD gave you more cores but they’re also generally weaker per core.

      • jihadjoe
      • 4 years ago

      I don’t think the price drops are meant to adjust Ryzen’s positioning relative to existing Kaby Lake chips, but rather in anticipation of the upcoming Skylake-Xs.

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    I’ve been checking Newegg pricing for the 1800X and I think it’s been at $460 for a while now. Also, if I’m not mistaken the 1700X has also been at ~$360 for a while now.

      • 1sh
      • 4 years ago

      +1
      Amazon had the discount for a while as well before Newegg.

    • Demetri
    • 4 years ago

    1700 is even lower on Amazon @ $300

    [url<]https://www.amazon.com/AMD-Processor-Wraith-Cooler-YD1700BBAEBOX/dp/B06WP5YCX6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496355747&sr=8-1&keywords=ryzen[/url<] Also, keep an eye on "refurbforless" on Ebay, a legit seller that has been frequently selling new Ryzens for below MSRP. 1700X for $320, 1600X for $220, 1600 for $200, etc.

      • Welch
      • 4 years ago

      Oh lawd… At 300 with a cooler I think I need to pass up the 1600x and gain 2 more cores. That is a helluva deal imho.

    • albundy
    • 4 years ago

    if only there were a good selection of x370 motherboards. i expected 2nd revisions at computex, but there were none reported. i can see why the cpu price dropped.

      • sreams
      • 4 years ago

      What would expect would be different on a “2nd revision” x370 board? It seems to me that the hardware is already there, and that these boards just need BIOS updates.

        • albundy
        • 4 years ago

        you’re assuming that board makers will offer those bios updates instead of offering a newer revision.

          • Tirk
          • 4 years ago

          My ram immediately worked with its XMP 3200 profile. What exactly are you waiting for a bios update or revision to fix?

    • smilingcrow
    • 4 years ago

    This in response to Intel’s Skylake X announcement?

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      The lower-end Skylake X parts as well as making room for lower-end Threadripper units.

      AMD is trying to clear their regular Ryzen inventory before Coffee Lake units come in at end of this year.

        • smilingcrow
        • 4 years ago

        There’s a leak suggesting they will release 9 models with 10, 12, 14 and 16 cores being a mix of with and without XFR.
        That’s a lot more than I imagined so I guess there will be a large price span starting at maybe $450-500 and going well above £1K.
        Obviously the performance will dictate pricing to a large degree as well as the features of the platform. MOAR lanes, MOAR lanes.

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      I would think so. I always think that everytime Intel or AMD sells a CPU it means the other vendor sells one less CPU. CPUs are used for years, and if more folks buy Ryzen now, they won’t buy Intel for the next year or so. This isn’t like collecting sunglasses or clothes where you can buy a Lacoste and also buy a Ralph Lauren the next day.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 4 years ago

    It’s an extra 45$ off with an Asus ROG Crosshair VI Hero O_O!

      • DrCR
      • 4 years ago

      It is wrong to assume O_O is part of the Asus’ product name? Maybe with a frogs and lasers graphic on the box.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 4 years ago

    This is only bad news for AMD, right? If they were selling in quantity there’d be no reason to drop the price.

      • wesley5904
      • 4 years ago

      I’m sure they are lowering prices to make room for the 9 Threadripper CPUs coming out?

        • freebird
        • 4 years ago

        yep, a bird in hand is worth 2 in the bush… the more CPUs they can sell ASAP the better… they are still making good money on them if they have over 80% good 8 cores dies from this process…and remember, it has been quite a few years where they have been able to sell cpus at this price level even at the new REDUCED price! That being said, they need revenue until the can get some sell through in major OEMs which usually isn’t until 6 months+ after the launch for AMD. In addition, they might have been expecting Vega to earn revenue sooner then it will so they might be trying to “spike” the quarter with a little juice to make the number palatable to Wall St….

      • chuckula
      • 4 years ago

      It makes these chips a better deal, but if they were selling like wildfire then the prices wouldn’t drop even if AMD slashed its own MSRP (see the price run ups that happened to AMD GPUs when the coin mining craze hit: high prices but AMD wasn’t collecting the money, it was retailers doing it).

      And as you mentioned in the forums… this is clearly not “in response” to anything that anybody else is doing since this market segment isn’t changing for at least another quarter. It appears to be an accounting move that AMD thinks will boost profits by getting more volume sold.

        • pdjblum
        • 4 years ago

        give it a rest

        why don’t you try focusing on the fact that they are offering amazing products at awesome prices, and that is a wonderful thing for us, and allow amd to focus on their finances and strategic plans and tactical moves, as i doubt you have even .01% of the intelligence and experience of the amazing management team at amd

        never heard of an “accounting move” other than ones to reflect how the financials are presented

        maybe a tactical move would be more correct

          • chuckula
          • 4 years ago

          I’m sorry I’m trying to have an intelligent conversation with an intelligent person.

          Perhaps [url=http://wccftech.com/asus-teases-5ghz-overclocks-amds-ryzen-threadripper-cpus/<]this[/url<] would suit somebody like you better.

        • smilingcrow
        • 4 years ago

        Intel announces an 8 core CPU with 28 PCIe Lanes for $599 to be released fairly soon and almost immediately AMD cuts the cost of their $499 8 core CPU with 16 PCIe Lanes.
        I’m not suggesting that is the only or even the major reason why they made the adjustment now but it seems likely it was one factor.
        AMD are in new territory with Ryzen pricing as it is not easy; just look at how high some thought they would go for.
        So I think it has been an ongoing experiment and they have been monitoring various factors so it may be that Skylake X is what pushed them to make the adjustment now.
        I think it’s a smart move as I think they have the margins to do this and they do require a decent volume to keep them moving forward.
        With more volume comes more respect and more testing from OEMs in terms of hardware and software which is the one stain on the platform which is to be expected at this stage.
        So a good defensive call to keep sales up hopefully.

          • willmore
          • 4 years ago

          Don’t the Ryzen chips have 24 PCI-E lanes and up to 8 more from the chipset? Where do you get 16?

            • Ninjitsu
            • 4 years ago

            it’s 16 + 8 from chipset

            [url<]https://techreport.com/r.x/2017_03_01_AMD_s_Ryzen_7_1800X_Ryzen_7_1700X_and_Ryzen_7_1700_CPUs_reviewed/chipset.png[/url<] [url<]https://techreport.com/review/31366/amd-ryzen-7-1800x-ryzen-7-1700x-and-ryzen-7-1700-cpus-reviewed/2[/url<]

            • willmore
            • 4 years ago

            [url<]https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/03/amd-ryzen-review/[/url<] Says 24+8. Looks like we need a more definative source. Wikichip says 20 from the CPU. This is just crazy.

            • psuedonymous
            • 4 years ago

            The Ryzen CPU has 16 lanes for a GPU, 4 for an m.2 slot (shared with some SATA ports, so you can have one or the other) and 4 for the chipset. The additional lanes available from the chipset are PCIe 2.0, not 3.0.
            The Skylake X lanes are separate from the DMI 3.0 link to the PCH, so all are available. The sATA ports are also all from the PCH, so do not affect CPU lane availability.

        • raddude9
        • 4 years ago
      • LostCat
      • 4 years ago

      They did say 80% of their stuff off the line had all 8 cores functional, so it makes sense to move as many of them as possible.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 4 years ago

        Maybe a good point. If the 8-core CPUs are getting undercut by 6-core parts, and if AMD is intentionally fusing off cores that are fine, then this might actually raise the average selling price.

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