Google confirms that Chrome will integrate an ad blocker in 2018

A little over a month ago, the internet started buzzing with rumors that Google would bake ad-blocking right into its Chrome browser. A new post on Google's blog, written by the company's Senior VP of Ads & Commerce Sridhar Ramaswamy, confirms that selective ad-blocking is coming to Chrome early next year.

Most websites, including ours, are funded at least in part through advertising. Some sites also use more intrusive ads than others. Intrusive ads include auto-playing audio, videos with sound, countdown timers, and pop-ups—among many other variants. Google believes these intrusive ads cause users to install ad-blocking software. Therefore, the company believes that if the obnoxious ads are eliminated, users won't go to the Chrome Store for the latest across-the-board ad-blocking browser add-on. To this end, Google joined the Coalition for Better Ads, a body that also includes Facebook and Reuters, among other organizations.

Ramaswamy says the company "plan(s) to have Chrome stop showing ads (including those owned or served by Google) on websites that are not compliant with the Better Ads Standards starting in early 2018." Put simply, all ads on pages containing any non-compliant advertising will be blocked by Chrome's built-in ad blocker. Whether this move will actually result in the desired effect is something to be seen.

The post also announced Funding Choices, a new program that extends the company's earlier Contributor service. Sites that choose to participate in Funding Choices can display a personalized message to users of ad-blocking software and offer them a choice to enable ads for the site or make microtransaction-like per-page payments through the user's Google Contributor pass.

Comments closed
    • ailsa1
    • 3 years ago

    Hello, this is a very informative article. I also got some posts that may be useful
    [url]https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/1/15726778/chrome-ad-blocker-early-2018-announced-google[url]

    [url<]https://www.mindstick.com/Articles/12411/google-will-integrate-an-ad-blocker-into-chrome-next-year[/url<]

    • Vaughn
    • 3 years ago

    I’ll stick to doing AB blocking from the router level.

    [url<]https://www.ab-solution.info/[/url<]

      • Meadows
      • 3 years ago

      “AB blocking”?

        • ab-solution
        • 3 years ago

        Ad blocking, using AB-Solution, the Ad Blocking Solution.
        Runs on wireless routers using the alternative firmware Asuswrt-Merlin.
        Asus routers mainly, but some other brand routers are supported as well with forks of the above firmware installed.

      • ab-solution
      • 3 years ago

      Thanks for your praising words @Vaughn for AB-Solution.
      I just posted some minor updates to scripts.

    • rika13
    • 3 years ago

    I wonder about the legality of this.

    Google is an advertising company, and by altering their browser to only show ads they approve of would scream anti-trust.

    • spiketheaardvark
    • 3 years ago

    Given Google’s huge chunk of the online advertising world, I’m rather cynical about this. I’d happily turn off my ad blockers if annoying and viral spreading ad s went away. But this could just as easily be a move to squash Google’s ad competition when Google served ads are the only ones to make it through. We’ll see if they still take the “don’t be evil” thing seriously these days

    • DarkUltra
    • 3 years ago

    We could also use some anti-tracking.

    [url<]https://www.eff.org/privacybadger[/url<]

      • travbrad
      • 3 years ago

      Somehow I don’t think Google is going to be pushing as hard for anti-tracking, considering they brag all the time about how good they are at tracking.

    • cheddarlump
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t mind sites using ads for revenue, but so much malware comes in via ads that I’m forced to block ads for my users, myself, etc. Simple, relevant, and non-overlaying/popup ads are fine, and if they can limit displayed advertising to those, more power to them.

      • LostCat
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t like ad blocking myself. I also get cheesed at sites with seriously obnoxious ads. Obviously, I avoid them but it’s hard to argue with someone stepping in and saying ‘enough.’

        • Ifalna
        • 3 years ago

        I have no idea how people use the Internet w/o an ad blocker. Maybe I am sensitive that way but I visit any given site to read about content that interests me and not to get screamed at by 20 virtual marketing guys that I should look at god knows what products. It’s almost as bad as in real life where, no matter where you look, there is some shitty ad in your field of view. >.<

        When I want something, that’s when I start doing research into these products. I don’t need any advertising and most certainly do I not need to get plastered with that crap 24/7.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    If it’s anything like as useless as Chrome’s current popup blocker it’ll be a waste of effort.

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Chrome has a pop-up blocker? o_O

      </sarcasm>

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Sarcasm is exactly what Chrome’s pop-up blocker deserves!

    • oldog
    • 3 years ago

    An integrated ad blocker? Well that is very “Brave” of Google.

    • VincentHanna
    • 3 years ago

    Why “in 2018?”

    • ozzuneoj
    • 3 years ago

    The vast majority of people I have talked to who were duped by scam sites posing as legitimate support sites found these sites simply by clicking on one of the first links in Google search results. I highly doubt this is going to change with Google controlling the ads on other websites. Adblock Plus allows you to disable these ads however. I’m sure Google’s real reason for doing this is to give people less incentive to use 3rd party add blockers that block everything that makes them money.

      • VincentHanna
      • 3 years ago

      Yes. Intrusive ads are one thing, and darned if some sites aren’t branching out into “intrusive content” popups and whatnot also…

      But Security is, by my estimation, the reason ad-blocker users use ad-blockers… even if they don’t know it. They likely have been influenced by someone else who does.

      Scam sites masquerading as legit buisnesses/ search results. Ads that redirect you to other sites without your permission, ads that hide malware and viruses, Scam sites (bears mentioning again.

        • Horshu
        • 3 years ago

        I use them because some sites (houstonpress.com) in a family of sites (they all look alike) blast my browser with so many requests my machine actually shuts down. I can almost hear my IO screaming before the whole machine shuts down. Ad-aware tones it down enough to where my machine will stay up. (NOTE: I am using the odious MS Edge, which mitigates almost *none* of the modern web annoyances, like 10 tabs autoplaying videos)
        Additionally, they tend to leave orphaned browser processes running, often stealing tons of CPU cycles. Ads are basically sandboxed malware that attempt to find new and ingenious ways to make my PC unusable.

    • tsk
    • 3 years ago

    I knew it.

    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/31775/rumor-google-to-bake-ad-blocking-into-chrome-browser?post=1032881#1032881[/url<]

    • layerup
    • 3 years ago

    Typo? [quote<]Therefore, the company [i<]belives[/i<] that [/quote<] Also may be missing the word 'go' in the statement that follows.

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      Correct on both accounts.

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Rats. Fixed.

      Is it too obvious that it was Computex week?

      Thanks for the heads-up.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    The cynic is me thinks that this initiative is Google’s effort to cement a stranglehold on the market and will run into governmental intervention.

    The Internet user in me loves the idea of an advertising whitelist. Too many sites inadvertently serve up malware through advertising, and there is nothing more infuriating than an autoplay advertisement or a page that loads to 99% then hangs on a complex ad.

      • DancinJack
      • 3 years ago

      I HIGHLY doubt this FCC (or FTC) will touch this. Have you seen their actions lately?

        • VincentHanna
        • 3 years ago

        I think that you underestimate the rank corruption of the current administration.

        What have they done so-far that makes you feel they are pursuing ideological or political ends? Assuming Google doesn’t do something stupid, like hurting the pretender-in-chief’s feelings, the FCC’s interest, or disinterest will go to whichever side can cultivate the most lucrative side deals.

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