Intel boasts Cannon Lake is “on track” and Ice Lake is “taped in”

Intel's push toward 10-nm production continues. The latest news on the street comes from a tweet in which the company says its Cannon Lake chips are "on track" and that its Ice Lake follow-up chips have been "taped in," which is to say that they've potentially reached the final design milestone before being sent to the company's foundries.

By "on track," Intel seems to be reinforcing its guidance that Cannon Lake chips will begin shipping in the second half of this year. Shipments of Cannon Lake in volume will begin in the first half of 2018, according to transcripts of Intel CEO Brian Krzanich by Ashraf Eassa at the Motley Fool.

The tweet didn't offer any further information about Coffee Lake, the company's fourth 14-nm CPU family that's expected to launch later this year. Although we didn't cover it at the time, Intel claimed that a 15W Coffee Lake CPU would offer 30% better performance than an equivalent Skylake part as part of its Core X-series launch. Since it's taken from the Sysmark benchmark, that figure likely represents across-the-chip improvements instead of a per-core increase. We'll just have to sit tight for more Coffee Lake details.

Comments closed
    • Redocbew
    • 2 years ago

    Wikipedia says “tape-in” was coined around 2010. For a second there I thought it was made up on the spot.

    Marketing dude: We need to say something about Ice Lake. Coffee Lake isn’t new anymore.
    Engineer: We haven’t even released Coffee Lake yet.
    Marketing dude: You know what I mean.
    Engineer: Not really…
    Marketing dude: Has Ice Lake taped out yet?
    Engineer: No, we’re not even close.
    Marketing dude: Has it taped in?
    Engineer: Wait, what?

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Tape ins are easy. Just put tape around the crime scene and you’re taped in.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I think now could be as good a time as any to start a poll about which upcoming CPUs people are waiting for. Zen 2, Coffee, no plans at all..

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      Zen2
      Cannonlake
      IceLake
      Zen3
      Zen2 Threadrippper v2 v(or Threadripper+1)
      IceLake+1
      Server Cannonlake

      Maybe add Zen3 for list?

      edit:
      1. clarification
      2. spelling server is harder than I thought
      3. added ThreadRipper+1

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      Plus cheese. Don’t forget the cheese.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I’d love to run Jones in the Fast Lane on a 10nm chip.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 2 years ago

    My newest system is Skylake…I got it two weeks ago (quad-core ThinkPad). Everything else at home is Haswell or Haswell Refresh. It’s so smooth and fast, I can hardly see how I’d need more.

    The only thing I’d have liked to see was a Skylake/Kaby Lake Mobile H-series (quad-core, that is) processor with eDRAM for integrated video. If I saw that, I probably wouldn’t go dedicated graphics. I can hope someday, but it seems like every segment I’d want that in, it isn’t offered just to make me go for the dedicated option.

    • Tristan
    • 2 years ago

    CAnnon Leak

    • psuedonymous
    • 2 years ago

    Remember back when Skylake was first being announced, and a bunch of overeager people took the initial announcement of BGA ULP parts to mean SKYLAKE IS LOW-POWER ONLY, or SKYLAKE WILL DITCH LGA, or similar premature sillyness? Don’t go making the same mistake with Cannon Lake. Intel have done phased low-power-first rollouts of their new chips for the past few generations, so expect that to continue to be the norm.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 2 years ago

      Would you expect Cannon Lake-S in mid-late 2018 and Cannon Lake-E (-X?) in 2019?

      • VincentHanna
      • 2 years ago

      I remember when skylake was first being announced and people were talking about 50 cores on consumer desktop parts.

      I must have been in different circles back then…

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, but it was going to be MediaTek giving you the 50 cores.
        They’re almost there!

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      Cannonlake IS mobile-only.

      In 2010, Intel introduced 32nm 6-core Westmere for high end LGA1366 replacement of Nehalem and 32nm 2-core Arrandale/Clarkdale for lower cost desktops and low power laptops.

      But just a few months before the 32nm parts we saw the mainstream quad-core Lynnfield on 45nm, one model being named i7-870. Sandy Bridge in early 2011 replaced both 32nm 2-core and the mainstream quad core in one fell sweep. That’s the situation that parallels today. 14nm Coffelake-S and 10nm Cannonlake low power will come within a quarter of each other.

      “ImSpartacus”

      Cannonlake-S doesn’t exist and Cannonlake server parts are said to be cancelled. You’ll see 14nm++ based Coffelake late this year. In fact the server parts disappeared from recent roadmaps. It did exist in early parts but plans change.

    • DavidC1
    • 2 years ago

    There’s not only that 10nm has low yields and is more expensive, but 14nm++ being used for Coffelake is better in performance than initial 10nm. In fact, they say 10nm+ will be just a tad worse so even that isn’t an upgrade for frequency-oriented parts like in desktops. 10nm brings density and power reduction.

    Cannonlake is only for mobile. Coffelake is for Desktops and high end laptops. Icelake should serve to replace both.

    By the way for someone saying something about Knights Mill. It’s still on 14nm. The first 10nm Xeon Phi will be Knights Hill. Knights Mill is seen by some as a knee-jerk response to sudden large increase in interest with Deep Learning and the success that Nvidia is having in that field.

    “Since it’s taken from the Sysmark benchmark, that figure likely represents across-the-chip improvements instead of a per-core increase.”

    Sysmark isn’t very highly threaded so a nice representative of typical desktop usage. I think dual cores have an advantage over single, but much less for quad over dual which is probably why the gains are only 30%. Since no one goes over Sysmark on multi-core scaling, Intel probably uses the figure to better hide performance numbers.

    • the
    • 2 years ago

    I thought Ice Lake would have skated in.

    • jensend
    • 2 years ago

    My understanding is that Coffee Lake graphics are Gen9.5 (just like Kaby Lake) while Cannon Lake is [url=https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Intel-Cannonlake-Gen10-Bringup<]confirmed to be Gen10[/url<]. The reason I think this could be of interest is because Gen10 *might* support VESA Adaptive Sync.

      • the
      • 2 years ago

      Intel has pretty much said as much.

      DP 1.3/1.4 and HDMI 2.0 support are also on tap for Gen10.

      • tsk
      • 2 years ago

      The way I understand it, Adaptive sync isn’t coming until Ice Lake.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I must be getting [i<]really[/i<] old. Skylake (6th Generation "Core" by Intel's own naming) still seems "fresh" to me and yet here we are talking about the 9th and 10th Gen chips launching this year. I may be wrong but architecturally most of these are all die-shrinks/resfreshes of Skylake still, right? Ice Lake is new architecture, I think but it won't be a dramatic change if history is anything to go by.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      Because kaby is gen7, and coffee is gen8 (?)

      Which means gen9 (cannon lake?) will have shipping parts before gen 8… (coffee lake).

      I think we should just count smartly. Sky/Kaby/coffee lakes are gen 6. Cannon is gen7.

      Just like how sites took it upon themselves to make GCN naming make sense. So should it be for Intel iCore generations.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I thought the way you did too, but apparently coffee lake is gen 9 because there’s a Kaby refresh due out in September that qualifies as “8th Gen”:

        [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_CPU_microarchitectures[/url<]

          • DavidC1
          • 2 years ago

          What? No. Coffeelake is basically Kabylake refresh. Well, its supposedly built on an improved process but nothing architecturally.

          Here’s the lineup that’ll exist by Q1 2018.

          Desktop:
          Coffeelake-S – 14nm++ up to 6 cores, 8th Gen Core

          Laptop:
          H-Series – 14nm++ up to 6 cores, 8th Gen Core, Coffeelake
          U and Y series – 10nm up to 2 cores, 8th Gen Core, Cannonlake
          Special 4 core version of U – 14nm, 4 cores, 8th Gen Core, Coffeelake?

          I think calling it all 8th Gen will make sense because process doesn’t bring much for neither Intel nor consumers anymore. Any power savings with new process are made nil because advanced power management means it only matters on load, which ultimately only impacts performance. Performance increase is barely there because we are at leakage and frequency limits and Intel themselves stated 10nm transistors perform less than 14nm++ transistors. 10nm saves space, but its likely to be quite more expensive per area so not much cost savings either.

            • NoOne ButMe
            • 2 years ago

            I recall seeing one ‘leaked’ roadmap with Coffee lake which made it seem like all the parts will be GT3e parts.

            That, I could excuse being called a new generation. Be very unhappy, but not totally against it.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 2 years ago

          Maybe Intel is trying to catch up their iCore generations to their iGPU generations?

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Everything after Haswell still feels like farts in the wind to me on the desktop side. Where they’re nice is fitting more power into smaller/longer lasting ultrabooks, but little on a consumer spectrum makes a quad haswell feel outdated.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]I pinch my nose. Only for a moment until the smell is gone. All we eat. Makes it smell so bad but we refuse to see. Farts in the wind. All we are is farts in the wind.[/quote<]

          • UberGerbil
          • 2 years ago

          — Kansass

            • tipoo
            • 2 years ago

            — Albert Einstein

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 2 years ago

    So when can we get another socketed Iris Pro chip for desktops? That’s what I’ve been waiting for. My overclocked Broadwell still keeps up with Kaby Lake chips in games due to the L4 cache. I’ve been patiently waiting for it to happen, but it seems like Intel has completely abandoned the idea. Maybe AMD can do something similar with a future APU, and if they do then I would likely go that route for my next upgrade.

    EDIT: Sad to admit, but odds are I will never really need another CPU upgrade anyway. It would take an entire platform of yet unreleased new features to tempt me. More money for other things, I guess!

      • auxy
      • 2 years ago

      I also am using a 5775C and want to know this. (´・ω・`)
      [sub<]Tho I have to say that when using DDR3-2133 CL9 as I am the difference between my chip at 4.3 and a 4790K at stock is infinitesimal... the EDRAM makes more difference with slow main memory. That's why I want a 7740K with DDR4-4000, hehehe. (⌒▽⌒) KBL-X is overpriced as hell tho.[/sub<]

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        +3 for shrinking the font.

          • auxy
          • 2 years ago

          They’re just subscript tags…

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            +3 for using subscript tags [sub<]just because you could[/sub<].

            • DeadOfKnight
            • 2 years ago

            +2 because I don’t think this post deserves more or less than +2 from me.

            Edit #10 for no reason at all.

            • HERETIC
            • 2 years ago

            Welcome back

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 2 years ago

        I got mine to 4.2 at 1.33v with DDR3-1866 CL8 and it scores about the same or barely below a stock clocked 7700k using the same GTX 1080 GPU as mine for most benchmarks I’ve seen. I also turned off HT, so that could be part of it since I know many games don’t benefit from it. Windows is set to performance mode. Maybe I won the lottery on the GPU too or have better cooling since there seems to be a good amount of variance when it comes to how aggressively these things boost. There are a lot of variables, but the bottom line is that I’ve been laughing my ass off for 3 generations of CPUs purportedly faster than mine. Devil’s Canyon, Skylake, and finally Kaby Lake only beating it with much higher clocks. I don’t really know how it compares to Zen, but it seems to be on par with mine for things other than gaming or highly-threaded workloads. I really should screenshot these things for future reference, but especially the new VR benchmarks are crushed by the i7-5775c@4.2

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Heh, Devil’s Canyon was before Broadwell, chief.

            • DeadOfKnight
            • 2 years ago

            I know, but they were still saying it was better than Broadwell and not to bother with them since Skylake was right around the corner. It was only when Damage tested it here on TR that I decided it’s what I wanted.

          • auxy
          • 2 years ago

          I am at 4.2 all-core 4.3 1/2 cores with 1.3v. It is not 100% perfect stable but very close and I think that has more to do with buggy Gigabyte firmware (it is just as stable at stock.) Temps are very low using voltage controlled Delta fans on a CM Hyper612 with lapped base on bare dies. I run HT ON these days and I advise you to also do so! (*´ω`*)

          I have a Ryzen system (basically an R7 1700 at stock with 2400 mem) and I can assure you our machines take a dump all over Ryzen in anything latency-sensitive like games. (*´艸`*) It is hard to compete with 8 cores for compiling or w/e but for gaming it is not even a contest…

        • juzz86
        • 2 years ago

        Welcome back! Long time no see 🙂

      • ImSpartacus
      • 2 years ago

      I agree – that’s what I’m waiting for.

      I’m getting close to the point where I can justify a cpu-mobo-ram upgrade and crystalwell is appetizing.

      • stefem
      • 2 years ago

      Intel revised how edram works in Skylake compared to Broadwell so I think that, at least initially, some product was planned

    • Bumper
    • 2 years ago

    Will coffee lake be available this year or next year?

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      2017

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      Yes, according to the last rumours I’ve seen mentioned.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 2 years ago

      The 95W -K stuff is rumored to come out in August.

      The rest of the lineup is due in January.

        • Flying Fox
        • 2 years ago

        I keep hearing people claiming it is coming “in 2 months”. I don’t think so. May be they will paper launch it, or may be you guys can give me some links about that? I would think realistically it will be in Q4, if only it will be out in volume by the Christmas shopping season.

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          There are purported 6 core engineering samples floating around: [url<]https://videocardz.com/69760/engineering-sample-update[/url<] (Info about Threadripper samples in there too BTW)

          • tsk
          • 2 years ago

          Here’s a roadmap directly from ASrock. This doesn’t give us any exact dates, but I’m definitely expecting cannonlake to launch by the end of the year.
          [url<]http://pc.watch.impress.co.jp/img/pcw/docs/1063/203/html/3.jpg.html[/url<]

    • cmrcmk
    • 2 years ago

    But when will they release the Xeon E5 v5’s??

      • the
      • 2 years ago

      Never? Intel has rebranded them into silver, gold and platinum.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    For those who missed it, Coffe Lake will be a 4 core part at 15W TDP. Suddenly the 30% performance improvement ain’t so impressive. But it will be nice to see some 4 core ultrabooks.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Yes, those 30% performance improvements smelled more like 28.7239072% to me. I knew it was too good to be true.

      • smilingcrow
      • 2 years ago

      Pragmatically, if the single and dual thread performance doesn’t take a hit and they can sustain a 30% gain for loads that utilise 4 threads at the same power consumption that’s still a win albeit in fewer categories.

        • tsk
        • 2 years ago

        It’s absolutely decent, but if they did the same thing with kaby lake(i.e 15W TDP on a 4C part) that number could probably be 20% or more as well.

          • smilingcrow
          • 2 years ago

          I don’t doubt it as not expecting much from Coffee Lake over Kaby Lake but maybe along with the core count increases they may drop a bomb or two.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 2 years ago

            I think if 6C12T CFL-K hits the same boost clocks as 7700K, then it’s a successful desktop generation.

            • smilingcrow
            • 2 years ago

            Moving to 6 core in itself has to be considered a win if you can utilise more cores even at lower clock speeds.
            I just don’t expect much apart from that.

      • mganai
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah. Too bad Apple seems to be ’86ing the MB Air line.

    • The Egg
    • 2 years ago

    If Cannon is shipping this year, then Coffee is sounding pretty meaningless. Notice how they always use a qualifier when mentioning performance (within a 15W envelope, etc). Probably no IPC improvement whatsoever.

    Guess I’ll probably be waiting for Cannon (from Sandy).

      • mganai
      • 2 years ago

      Read the above responses. Coffee Lake is for desktops and standard/higher end laptops and will be the first mainstream CPUs to reach 6 cores. Cannonlake will be for tablets/convertibles and ultra low power laptops.

        • The Egg
        • 2 years ago

        Meh. IMO it actually sounds least useful on a desktop. Improvements will be in power efficiency, with 4-core parts only getting a minor 200-300mhz clockspeed bump to show for anything. Enthusiasts wanting 6-core i7’s would be better to wait for Cannon.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 2 years ago

          So what, cannon lake brings 0-5% ipc?

          Oh boy.

          If you need the cores, than coffee lake isn’t a bad choice.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      schedule seems something like this:
      4q2017/1q208 coffee 2+2 (2+3?)
      1-2q2018 cannon 6+2 (4+2?)
      3-4q2018 coffee (4+2? 6+2? 4+3?)

        • DavidC1
        • 2 years ago

        Nope.

        4q2017/1q2008 Coffelake 6+2
        1-2q2018 Cannonlake 2+2
        Year after – next generation

        There will also be 4 core 14nm parts for 15W chips. It’s a mess because it’ll exist with 10nm 2 core parts and will likely all be named 8th Gen Core. Its quite certain it probably wasn’t Intel’s original plans, and 14nm delays seriously messed things up. Oh, and Brian and his team being off the meds or something.

      • the
      • 2 years ago

      The reason for having both Cannon and Coffee Lake is that the inherent cost savings for a shrink simply aren’t there anymore. The market segment that gains from smaller, more energy efficient transistors will go t 10 nm first and right now that’s ultra mobile. The first big chip on 10 nm will likely be Knight’s Mill. Higher volume parts like mobile/desktop and server chips will follow in late 2018/early 2019.

      Coffee Lake is a desktop stop gap solution for desktop chips. Considering that it’ll bring 6 core support to LGA 1151, it’ll be a welcome addition.

      Intel has also disclosed that future chips will start to EMIB which uses multiple dies and each die may not be from the same process node. CPU core and GPU cores will get the new node treatment while last level caches and IO may lag by a few nodes.

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 2 years ago

        Intel says the hyperscaling is as much of a cost saver as if they moved to 450 wafers.

        [url<]https://newsroom.intel.com/newsroom/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2017/03/Ruth-Brain-2017-Manufacturing.pdf[/url<] Page 36

        • D@ Br@b($)!
        • 2 years ago

        Yes but also:

        “Coffee lake sounds great but why Intel is launching two different families at the same time still needs to be answered. It is mentioned that Intel has had much experience with 14nm process node and considering that the 10nm process won’t have great yields when it’s available in 2018, it’s better to built large chip dies on an existing yet matured and optimized process node which is 14nm.”
        [url<]http://wccftech.com/intel-14nm-coffee-lake-10nm-cannonlake-2018/[/url<]

      • Flying Fox
      • 2 years ago

      I haven’t seen any mention of 6-core Cannon yet. So if you want more than 4-cores, you have to go for Coffee.

    • themattman
    • 2 years ago

    With the potential close release dates of Coffee Lake and Cannon Lake, does it make sense to look at Coffee Lake processors? Or would the refinement to the 14nm chips be enough to overcome the benefits from shrinking to 10nm?

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 2 years ago

    Why release coffee lake at all if Cannon lake is only months behind?

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      The first cannonlake parts are going to be in the very low-power end of the spectrum for mobile. Most of Coffee lake is going to be going into higher power envelopes where it will be a while before there are 10nm products.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 2 years ago

      10nm yields are bad, so the large yield-sensitive chips go to Coffee Lake on 14++nm.

      That’s the 4+2 (erm, 6+2?), 2+2 and 2+3 die if I recall correctly. So that’s some laptops all the way up to the beefy 95W -K desktop parts.

      Anything meant for ultrabooks is cannon lake because those chips are sufficiently small and benefit the most from 10nm’s increased efficiency.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    “Taped in?”

    Nice try Intel, but you aren’t fooling anyone.

    #ThreadripperLaunchedFirst
    #7nmRyzen2LaunchedSecond
    #CannonLakeFailedEpycally

    • Neutronbeam
    • 2 years ago

    If they are 10-nm chips then Intel’s onto some thin Ice.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      Especially if they’re bringing a Cannon along…

        • Growler
        • 2 years ago

        It’s a really small Cannon, though.

          • allreadydead
          • 2 years ago

          That’s what AMD said..

            • K-L-Waster
            • 2 years ago

            Noisy Cricket?

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