Razer blows up the display in the Razer Blade Stealth

Razer's Blade Stealth laptops cram a heaping helping of high-end parts into a slim-and-trim package, but the screen and its associated bezels have lagged somewhat behind ultrabooks like Dell's XPS 13 models that have punched the display out to the very edges of the lid. Razer has made tangible progress on this front with the 13.3" screen in its updated Blade Stealth.

The updated panel is a touch-screen with a resolution of 3200×1800 and wide 170° viewing angles. Machines with the new screen have the same 12.6" x 8.1" x 0.5" (32 cm x 21 cm x 1.3 cm) dimensions as the old model, but the weight increased marginally from 2.84 lbs to 2.93 lbs (1.29 kg to 1.33 kg). The webcam got downgraded from a 2 MP unit to a 720p snapper, though. The "old" 12.5" screens are still available in non-touch 2560×1440 and touch-enabled 3840×2160 resolutions.

The new Blade Stealth is otherwise a lot like the previous model. The updated version packs an Intel Kaby Lake Core i7-7500U CPU, 16 GB of non-upgradeable dual-channel LPDDR3 memory, and solid-state storage options in capacities from 256 GB to 1 TB. The only graphics chip option is the Intel HD Graphics 620 IGP, though the Blade Stealth is compatible with the company's Core external graphics card enclosure. Networking comes courtesy of a Killer 802.11ac-and-Bluetooth controller. For input and output, the Razer Stealth provides a Thunderbolt 3 port, two USB 3.0 jacks, a four-pole audio minijack, and an HDMI port.

Buyers of the Blade Stealth with the 13.3" screen get two color choices. Machines with the black finish get an RGB LED-illuminated keyboard and a Razer-green bundle of snakes logo on the lid. Gunmetal grey models get a blacked-out logo and a white-backlit keyboard. The larger-screen versions start at $1400. The external graphics box adds another $400 when purchased with the notebook. Razer says the updated Blade Stealth will start shipping in July.

Comments closed
    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    A 3K screen at 13″ murders your battery life for no tangible benefit. You can’t game well at 3K (even with an external GPU) or find native media content, and productivity work at such a high rez and small screen would kill your eyes. I wish manufacturers would stop pushing this checkbox.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 2 years ago

      In practice, the UI will be scaled up so you have an effective 1600×900 resolution. The same with the 4k screens, only it will be scaled to 1920×1080. The benefit is the extra sharpness and free anti-aliasing that the extra pixels give you.

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 2 years ago

    This is really appealing despite Razer’s terrible quality. Since there’s no dGPU, a TB3 eGPU would likely be wired directly to the CPU’s PCIe lanes instead of the southbridge, which could make it compete with a similarly specc’d Alienware (Alienware’s graphics amplifier routes directly to the CPU PCIe lanes after a reboot). Only question left is how much thermal headroom that 7500U has, and if Razer can keep it at 20+W of TDP.

    I wish it came in a FHD touchscreen and with a 7600U instead. And, you know, $400 cheaper. Or with a free Core or something.

    Darn you Razer with your Maclike designs+prices, and Acerlike build quality!

      • leor
      • 2 years ago

      Not sure what you mean about build quality, I have a razer blade 14 from 2014 and I recently picked up a stealth and the build quality is amazing.

        • DancinJack
        • 2 years ago

        It’s mostly their peripherals and accessories that have taken a nose dive in quality the last seven or eight years. Mice, keyboards etc.

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 2 years ago

        I’ve heard several complaints about people’s Blades not booting anymore, or one model the thermal management begins to melt the plastic by the bezel.

        Just going by: [url<]https://www.reddit.com/r/razer/[/url<] I appreciate the anecdote though, that gives me hope!

      • [+Duracell-]
      • 2 years ago

      I had the 1st gen Stealth for a while. It was actually a pretty sturdy ultrabook…closer to Mac quality than anything. You do get the fans kicking in pretty quickly at load. However, it seemed to keep up as I didn’t really notice any thermal throttling, especially with the TB3 GPU dock.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Nice. The Stealth was an ok first attempt at an ultrabook, but man did those thick bezels date it, it wasn’t just regular bezel complaining, these were *custom big*, at least for 2016/2017.

    This update is welcome. Should be a more appealing package.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 2 years ago

    the lack of discrete GPU is what hurts this offering. Though the screen is impressive.

      • [+Duracell-]
      • 2 years ago

      Are there any ultrabooks that have a discrete GPU?

        • BoilerGamer
        • 2 years ago

        Nope, in the 13″ sphere of ultrabooks it is all iGPU, you have to go up to the 15″ “thin and light” category to find things like XPS 15 or Aero 14/15 with a dGPU

        It is nice that they increased display size and reduced bezel, but still not on the level with XPS 13, and also no build-in windows hello feature(either a tap fingerprint scanner or face scan webcam).

          • aspect
          • 2 years ago

          Surface Book? That’s ultra book sized.

            • BoilerGamer
            • 2 years ago

            >Surface Book? That’s ultra book sized.

            If you only count the top(which only have a iGP), once you add the “peformance base” its weight and size(3.5lb, 12.3×9.14 x 0.51-0.90) is more similar to XPS 15(3.9lb, 14.06 x 9.27 x 0.45-0.66, “thin and light”) than XPS 13(2.6lb, 11.98″ x 7.88″ x 0.33-0.6″, ultrabook)

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 2 years ago

        I was going to note a few new releases with 940MXs, but let’s be real: that GPU does not count.

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 2 years ago

      It’s not supposed to have a discrete GPU, that’s what the dock is for. Razer sells a different laptop with a GPU.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      The whole point is using an eGPU with their $500 dongle

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      It’s a 12 inch ultrabook…None have that that I know of, but this one at least has a special trick with the Core.

      • ChicagoDave
      • 2 years ago

      Honestly I bet a dual core “U” series processor would have trouble keeping up with a dGPU. Generally the only laptops with dGPU’s have quad core “HQ” series processors with a higher power envelope.

      With that said, it will be interesting to see how the upcoming quad core “U” chips perform (think they’re Coffee Lake, but I’m having trouble keeping track at this point).

      • Kurotetsu
      • 2 years ago

      That’s probably not possible given its dimension. What hurts is that they don’t use a CPU with Iris Plus/Pro integrated graphics, like the Macbook Pros do.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<] wide 170° viewing angles[/quote<] Doesn't that usually mean a TN panel? So vieweing angles aren't much better than 20°, around 10 each way. Less of an issue on a laptop, though.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      I think laptops are actually more subject to off-angle viewing due to the multitude of positions a user may be in when the use them.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Last one was an IGZO IPS, so I doubt it would regress.

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      You’re assuming that the 178º angles usually quoted aren’t, ahem, complete bovine droppings.

      If I had to guess, Razer’s probably (shock!) actually talking the true figures.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        That would be a very pleasant surprise. And of course quoted viewing angles are rarely accurate – that’s why I expected Razer to be playing the same game as everyone else. Make it easy for me to see what I’m buying.

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