Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box is a pre-packaged powerhouse

External GPU docks haven't really hit the mainstream yet. There are a variety of reasons for this, but among them could be the hassle, size, or price of the add-on enclosures. We saw Gigabyte's Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box a few weeks ago during Computex, and it looks like it tries to address all three of those complaints at once. Not only does the enclosure come pre-packed with an ITX-sized GeForce GTX 1070, it's also among the smallest external GPU boxes we've seen.

The box itself measures 8.3" (21 cm) in length, 6.4" (16 cm) in height, and a little under 3.8" (9.6 cm) in width—barely larger than some GTX 1070 cards themselves. Inside the Gaming Box are the aforementioned GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card and a 450 W power supply. Thanks to that grossly overspec'd PSU, the Gaming Box can power the graphics card and four USB 3.0 devices, all while supplying up to 100W to the host system over its Thunderbolt 3 connection. One of the USB ports supports quick charging, too. Fortunately, the power supply is 80 Plus Gold certified, so it shouldn't waste too much power even if you're not pushing it all that hard.

The GeForce in the box appears to be one of Gigabyte's regular GeForce GTX 1070 Mini ITX models. It has a curious assortment of connections for a GTX 1070: one DisplayPort, one HDMI 2.0 output, and two DVI ports. Even though the graphics card itself is bereft of lighting, the enclosure includes RGB LED accents that are of course configurable through Gigabyte's RGB Fusion app. The app isn't required to use the box, though. Along with your purchase, you get a handy carrying bag for when your want to bring the Gaming Box with you.

Gigabyte still hasn't come forward with pricing details for the Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box, but back at Computex the company floated a vague "around $500" figure in front of our eyes. That's a heck of a deal for a box like this with a GeForce GTX 1070 included. Even $550 would have made this an excellent value compared to its competition. The company says the Gaming Box is out now, so we expect to see it on store shelves soon.

Comments closed
    • Anovoca
    • 2 years ago

    At this point I would just as soon build a Dan4 ITX system and skip the middleman (laptop).

      • oldog
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve got one on order through Kickstarter; only 6 months away from shipping.

      (Twiddles thumbs…)

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 2 years ago

    $550 for a GTX 1070 is a steal right now: [url<]https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=gtx+1070[/url<]

      • Voldenuit
      • 2 years ago

      I know, right?

      This mining craze is madness, but I’m surprised it took so long for miners to figure out that the 1070 (at the time in plentiful supply) was as good or better than 580s that were going for $600+.

        • southrncomfortjm
        • 2 years ago

        The bubble will burst soon. Glad I sold my RX 480 for a healthy profit already.

          • Voldenuit
          • 2 years ago

          That’s what I thought when BTC topped $200, and today it’s $2600.

            • southrncomfortjm
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah, but the GPUs went back down in price is what I mean. The high GPU prices lasted a few months.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            The apex of GPU prices was due to an ASIC being released that could do it faster than the GPU. That’ll eventually happen with Ethereum, hopefully, but it could be a bit yet.

            • Voldenuit
            • 2 years ago

            It wasn’t just the release of ASICs.

            The difficulty of the hashing rises exponentially as more coin is mined, so the productivity/profitability of mining starts to drop on a given mining setup over time.

            EDIT: I’ve also read on some forums that in the near future, the memory space for unmined coin (ETH) might exceed the frame buffer of 3 GB cards like the 1060…

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Even without bloated prices it’s a good deal. So far, the best solution has been the Sonnet eGFX Breakaway Box, which is $350 with the 550W PSU. Only that version can [url=http://www.sonnettech.com/product/egfx-breakaway-box.html<]deliver 87W to the host[/url<].

        • southrncomfortjm
        • 2 years ago

        Sure, but we all know this will not sell for MSRP if the mining craze is ongoing.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          For sure, but that handicap affects all eGPU solutions because you need a GPU to e.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    No NIC? I guess at that price I could justify adding one to the USB3 hub they included.

      • Convert
      • 2 years ago

      Why a NIC?

      Is the idea you would use one of these with a laptop that wouldn’t have a NIC?

      I guess I’ve never really given these much thought, but I see how it starts trending towards an interesting concept, one where you have a small tower with all the gaming oomph and connectivity you could need. You just connect a cable between it and your laptop and you have a full fledged gaming PC while at home.

      Then again with all the cloud offerings and integration now days, I guess I’ve never really seen the need to be able to essentially take my PC on the road, when I already have a laptop. I suppose this would definitely save some money without having to buy two full, and specialized, setups.

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 2 years ago

        If it has a NIC it’s one less thing I have to plug/unplug when I get to my desk. Before you ask, yes I am that lazy. First world problems, right?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          Everyone wants a single-plug docking solution. To that end, delivering power over TB3 is huge compared to the competition. The AKiTiO Node, for example, only delivers 15W. It’ll charge your laptop, but it’ll take forever doing it.

        • Drachasor
        • 2 years ago

        Consider, you have an ultra-thin laptop or 2-in-1 with thunderbolt 3. Now you can have all the graphics power you need with that just by plugging in an external card. But such systems do not have NICs, they are too thin for NICs.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 2 years ago

    I am probably in a very small minority here but I would love to see someone do an even smaller, less expensive, lower power box that tops out at roughly GTX 1060 spec.

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      They want to get wild, build something using the mobile configurations of these GPUs, and shrink all the things.

      • Spunjji
      • 2 years ago

      Absolutely in agreement – I don’t think the power available from most notebooks warrants much more, and the bandwidth restrictions of the interface preclude ultra-high-res gaming.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Given that the PSUs required for these external GPUS make the whole box big enough to rival a complete mITX build, I agree with you. Even though this is small compared to mostexternal GPU enclosures, the enclosure is comfortably five to six times larger than the volume of the GPU itself.

      There’s a market for a much smaller box, with a slim laptop power brick, say ~100W. That would handle an RX550 or a 1050Ti with ease, and those cards are mostly very compact models too. It wouldn’t need to be much larger than the GPU itself and the slim brick could either be completely separate, or simply integrated into the base of the enclosure.

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