Netgear readies the Nighthawk X6S for take-off

Netgear has added another member to its Nighthawk line of spider-spacecraft-inspired Wi-Fi routers. The Nighthawk X6S (model name R8000P) has tri-band Wi-Fi support with theoretical speeds of up to a combined 4000 Mbps through the air. 

The router is built around an unnamed dual-core 64-bit SoC clocked at 1.8 GHz. Netgear doesn't say, but we suspect it's some flavor of the ubiquitous ARM architecture. The company notes that the SoC is backed up by three TCP offload processors, something that may help reduce CPU load during large data transfers. The router has 512 MB of system memory and 128 MB of onboard flash storage. One USB 2.0 port and a USB 3.0 connector allow for sharing media or files from storage devices connected directly to the router.

The six antennas sprouting from the X6S' sides work with in a 3×3 configuration for all three transmission bands and support MU-MIMO for simultaneous streaming to multiple devices. A Smart Connect feature uses the same SSID for all bands and automatically moves devices to the most appropriate one. The single WAN port and four LAN ports are all of the Gigabit Ethernet variety, though the X6S lets users aggregate two LAN ports for connecting to a compatible high-demand device like a home server.

The Nighthawk X6S also has a couple of software tricks up its sleeve. Attached storage devices can be used with Netgear's ReadyCloud feature to create a personal cloud. This can let users enjoy the convenience of cloud-based file storage service but with extra privacy and no extra expenses. The company's Home Genie app allows for managing the router remotely, while Alexa support provides addtional control options when the user is home.

The Netgear Nighthawk X6S Wi-Fi router will go on sale at the end of the month for $300.

Comments closed
    • cheesyking
    • 2 years ago

    “The company’s Home Genie app allows for managing the router remotely”

    How long before this is found to be laughably insecure?

      • Vaughn
      • 2 years ago

      Yup most of these apps require you to open the WAN side of the router to the internet so you can connect remotely. Which is a major security issue for me I only use them when i’m at home.

      Right now on my R7000

      SSH is only open on the LAN
      Nothing on the WAN is open to the outside internet.

      I’ve seen people get hacked because they left that open and thought they had super strong password.
      Just to took at the router logs later and noticed someone was in their shit.

    • blahsaysblah
    • 2 years ago

    The race is on to get enough capacity and sensitivity to real time map the surrounding environment…

    • JalaleenRumi
    • 2 years ago

    Did they BloodEagle the Router?

    • DancinJack
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder if there could ever been a networking article on this site without someone gushing about Ubiquiti. Y’know, as if we hadn’t heard about how awesome their stuff is every time a networking news piece goes up here.

    I’m sure this router will suit plenty of people just fine.

      • yokem55
      • 2 years ago

      Oh, I’m sure it will suit people quite well. I just think it is a bit ironic that people who go nuts carefully picking out PC components to build their own PC’s turn to the equivalent of an Alienware All-In-One when it comes to their networking gear.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah…WE know. But a lot of people read the front page in drive-by or lurker mode. Before throwing three Benjamins at a sci-fi movie prop, they deserve to know there are alternatives that don’t come with the inevitable Consumer-Grade Firmware Penalty.

    • yokem55
    • 2 years ago

    I suppose these things are supposed to be for PC enthusiasts who don’t want to be serious networking enthusiasts. A PC router with PFSense or a Ubiquiti Edgrerouter Lite, a real managed gigabit switch (used Juniper EX 2200’s are only $100 on eBay), and a Ubiquiti AP or 2 would run circles around these things and be more reliable to boot.

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      I dunno man, two Google Wifis suit my needs just fine. I prefer the mostly hands off but still secure approach. (And will not likely ever run a server.)

      • blahsaysblah
      • 2 years ago

      I dont get PfSense. I went and created and used it for several months, but could never wrap my head around the fact that it gets updated extremely infrequently.

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 2 years ago

        It is stable and predictable by design. There are not a lot of software bugs to correct. On the security side BSD is usually pretty secure and stable. There are tons of packages that get updates fairly frequently, though. But if you want the latest wiz-bang feature PFSense is not for you.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    Nighthawk?

    Not when there’s [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCItnKrXvMM<]Street Hawk[/url<].

    • strangerguy
    • 2 years ago

    I always chuckle whenever I see these expensive consumer routers touting “bleeding edge HW” only be slaughtered in HW specs by far cheaper Chinese smartphones, and let’s not pretend phones doesn’t have other additional BoM costs either.

      • christos_thski
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah… routers have got to be some of the most overpriced consumer technology (well… pre nand/dram collusion no.17, at least).

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Less aesthetic shenanigans and more firmware work, please.

      • Anovoca
      • 2 years ago

      They just posted a firmware update for the nighthawk series last night.

      Edit: [url<]http://netgear.com/support/[/url<]

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    Can I get that radio in a Ubiquity AP, please?

    • DancinJack
    • 2 years ago

    I’ll just leave this here because it’s way more interesting.

    [url<]https://www.amazon.com/XG-C100C-Network-Adapter-PCI-E-Single/dp/B072N84DG6/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?[/url<]

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    I do not understand how anyone would look at this and go “Oh! Cool router!” and no “ugh, wtf is that ugly thing?”.

      • Vaughn
      • 2 years ago

      All the new highend routers look like this be it Dlink or Asus or netgear sadly.

      I still have an R7000 running asus merlin firmware and love the simple 3×3 configuration.

      Also open firmware support is important cause netgear’s firmware suck.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        It’s a sad state of affairs.

        Just like RGB everything. Next, routers with RGB that sync to your desktop…

        • Thresher
        • 2 years ago

        I fully expect this to bend it’s aerials down, detach the cords, and skitter away.

      • RedBearArmy
      • 2 years ago

      Looks like a Chromecast dispenser.

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