Douse Nvidia’s finest with the EVGA GTX 1080 Ti Hydro Copper

If you're going to the trouble of building a custom watercooling loop, you're probably building a pretty high-end system. Right now, if we're talking high-end graphics card, the buck stops at the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (unless you have $1200 to burn on the Titan Xp). To the delight of the most fervent of enthusiasts, EVGA has finally released its Hydro Copper edition of the GTX 1080 Ti, known in full as the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti SC Hydro Copper Gaming.

This card pairs the GP102 GPU of the GTX 1080 Ti with a full-coverage waterblock that can be had with either white or RGB LED lighting. The RGB LED version is a mite more expensive than its monochromatic twin, but it also includes EVGA's iCX nine-sensor thermal monitoring solution. Both versions of the card are otherwise identical, so you get three DisplayPorts, an HDMI port, and a DVI port out back.

As expected, EVGA specs the Hydro Copper cards for a significant overclock over the reference design: nominal rates of 1556 MHz base and 1670 MHz boost speeds, compared to the Founders Edition's 1480 MHz base and 1582 MHz boost clocks. Those increases might not be as extreme as you'd expect from a card carrying a full-coverage waterblock, but Nvidia's GPU Boost 3.0 feature will likely deliver much higher speeds in practice.

The cards haven't shown up at e-tail yet, but EVGA says the white-LED version should go for $820, while the iCX-enabled RGB LED-equipped version should be just $20 more at $840.

Comments closed
    • UberGerbil
    • 2 years ago

    I don’t know, when I see “Hydro Copper” my first thought is something like [url=http://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/000c130ab0f9105d7c4f3fdf04b516b1<]this[/url<].

      • LovermanOwens
      • 2 years ago

      Chinese food literally just flew out of my mouth mid chew at work when I clicked that link. Thank you for that.

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    I didn’t think EVGA was even going to make one of these this time around, all indications in the EVGA forums was that they were not. They took their time with it, the 480 Hydro was announced alongside the launch of the 480 series itself.

    The Aorus Waterforce has 200Mhz better clocks and an extra year on the warranty. If only Aorus had used this block instead of all the crappy acrylic it’d be the de facto choice.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    LOL at the air-cooler holes in the expansion slot cover.

    You’d think for an $820+ card they could pay a little attention to detail right? Nope, this is the same piece of stamped pig-iron used for assisting exhaust airflow on the non-watercooled models… :\

      • RedBearArmy
      • 2 years ago

      Not only that. They don’t even have the decency to trim the fat and make the card slim 🙁

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I can forgive them that because making it slimmer (single slot) would mean they’d need to lose a port too.

        In saying that, who would be adding a decade-old DVI-only monitor to a multi-thousand dollar watercooled rig with an $840 graphics card? That’s like buying expensive single-malt Scotch and then mixing it with an energy drink in a dirty coffee mug.

          • Kougar
          • 2 years ago

          Everyone else added DVI slots, if the card is going to be dual-slot then why not? I still use a thick gauge DVI to power my U3011 display because it’s a particularly long, quality cable. The only benefit I know of to shilling $10 out for an equivalent displayport would be a thinner cable.

          When they invent a high-res, high-quality 30″ or greater panel that also does 120FPS, I’ll buy a damn displayport cable. /shakes cane in air

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 2 years ago

            My 3007WFP has only a dual-link DVI-D input and my 2001FP beside it has to use a DisplayPort to DVI-D active adapter.
            [url<]http://www.ubergizmo.com/reviews/dell-3007wfp-30-inch-lcd-monitor-review/[/url<]

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          The really offensive part is that this card isn’t even a custom board design. It’s only 7+2 phases just like the reference board. Heh. Not that you have voltage control on Pascal, so I guess it doesn’t matter…?

          [quote<]That's like buying expensive single-malt Scotch and then mixing it with an energy drink in a dirty coffee mug.[/quote<]Hey, don't judge. 😛

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            /raises dirty coffee mug in agreement

          • brucethemoose
          • 2 years ago

          Old 1440p Korean OC monitors are DVI only, and it wouldn’t be a terrible monitor to run with one of these.

          That’s probably not what EVGA had in mind when adding the port on, though.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah, I was running on of the original Korean monitors (Achieva ShiMian) until last year off mine.

            I don’t think DVI is a dead standard yet, but I do think people spending 2-3x more than their monitor on a graphics card alone are doing it wrong – It’s almost a crime to buy something as fancy as a watercooled 1080Ti and not use at least something with high-refresh or VRR (preferably both!)

      • Kougar
      • 2 years ago

      When I bought my GTX 480 Hydro it included an extra low-profile bracket in the box.

      The issue with using a single-slot bracket is the weight, a single slot will not prevent the ass-end of the card from slipping partially out of some PCIe slots under its own weight. I had issues with this even despite the PCIe slot “locking mechanism” on two different boards, which really didn’t do jack to prevent it. Every time I’d haul the system out to datavac it I’d need to check the card.

      The problem is especially magnified by any cases that used “screwless” locking slot designs. Twice I recall opening these cases after BSoDs or no-POST issues to find the card hanging with just half of PCIe pins in the slot, so I’ve always had to use screws. In comparison my dual-slot Titan Black Hydro card didn’t have slot slippage issues.

      So As a long time Hydro buyer, I prefer dual-slots. It’s not like I’m running two of these anyway.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        Generally you need two slots of plumbing purposes anyway, so you couldn’t put a pair of these next to each other very easily unless you ran them in parallel (which most are loath to do for various reasons).

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Interesting take on it!

        I’ve built machines with beefy GPUS that require a journey through overground mail systems. In the beginning I would use the PCIe power connectors as support, since they’re quite sturdy and then you can tag them down to the drive cage such that the stiff, inflexible cables took SOME of the weight of the card.

        More recently, I’ve been buying 1″ black PVC piping, copiously hot-glueing it to the top and bottom of the case and then dremmelling out a couple of notches to slot the GPUS unsupported ends into. It’s a bit sturdier and also provides a convenient tagging point to hide the PCIe power cables behind.

        I probably wouldn’t bother if that was the only thing I needed holt-melt glue for, but I also like to glue the front panel headers together to make a single block and I also snip off redundant/excess power connectors and use hot glue as a substitute for ugly electrical tape. Since the glue-gun is already hot and in use, trimming a piece of plastic pipe (which is abundant in the next department over from my desk) takes only a minute or two.

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