Silverstone’s Strider Titanium PSUs are ready for a high-power future

The trend in components over the last few years has been towards offering higher performance with less power draw. However, with the looming availability of Intel's high-core-count Skylake-X CPUs, AMD's Threadripper chips, and AMD's potentially thirsty Vega FE graphics cards, the low-power tide may be heading back out, at least with respect to top-of-the-line hardware. Silverstone's Strider Titanium PSU lineup is certainly ready for an increase in wattage demands. The series is growing from three to six members with the addition of the ST1100-TI, ST1300-TI, and ST1500-TI models.

The model names give a pretty clear idea of what to expect. Like the existing 600 W, 700 W, and 800 W members of the Strider Titanium family, the three new additions are 80 Plus Titanium certified and offer 90% conversion efficiency even when operating at 10% load. Despite their impressive power handling, the units aren't really large—their packaging efficiency is quite high, with power densities ranging from 474 W/L in the ST-1100TI all the way up to 646 W/L in the range-topping ST1500-TI. Silverstone touts the unit's all-Japanese capacitors, their ability to run 24 hours a day at 50° C temperatures, and low ripple and line noise.

As for creature comforts, the large Strider Titanium PSUs boast all-modular cabling. The black cables are flat for easier routing. There's a large 135-mm fan that spins up only when the power supply has a load of 20% or more, which means the ST1500-TI can deliver enough power for a full system with a GeForce GTX 1080 under load without bothering to turn on its fan.

Silverstone didn't provide pricing or availability details for the new large-capacity power supplies, but we would expect all three models to bear larger price tags than the $180 asking price of the existing 800 W ST80F-TI. Silverstone backs all the units with a five-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • meerkt
    • 2 years ago

    No power switch?!

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    For when you absolutely have to fill your mining rigs with Fury X cards….

    • adampk17
    • 2 years ago

    Much higher and you’ll need more than your average 15A house circuit to feed just your PC.

    o_O

      • BoilerGamer
      • 2 years ago

      >Much higher and you’ll need more than your average 15A house circuit to feed just your PC.

      PSU like these are perfect for Miners and their massive GPU racks, I imagine that’s the selling point of most of these over 1KW Titanium PSUs as normals don’t really need that much power or the 90% efficiency at 100% load

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Really?

      Other things people plug into every day without even thinking about:

      3KW electric kettles
      1.5KW toasters
      2KW fan heaters
      2.5KW hair dryers.

      Unlike a PSU, these things will all draw full load when on, whilst a platinum-efficiency 1500W
      PSU will [i<]peak[/i<] at maybe 1600W but most likely run at far less than that even with a typical high-load configuration.

        • adampk17
        • 2 years ago

        I am not an electrician but I’m pretty sure at 15A circuit can deliver about 1800 watts. I googled and here is what came up.

        “Most modern residential circuits are 15 or 20 amps, so we’re looking at a max load of either (15A x 120V =) 1800 watts or (20A x 120V =) 2400 watts before the breaker trips.”

        So I’m not sure about your high load devices and how those don’t trip breakers.

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          Wow, 120V mains voltage sucks.

          How does a typical person in the US not trip the breaker just cooking breakfast every morning? 1KW microwave oven, 3KW electric kettle, 1.5KW toaster are commodity items that I use at the same time.

          Coffee and bacon? 5.5KW.
          1800W circuits just seem woefully inadequate for domestic use.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 2 years ago

            Hello, bro.

            Let me see if I can help. The national electric code in the US requires minimum two 20A circuits in the kitchen and states can increase that number. 15A circuits are inadequate for kitchen use. I am not an electrician but an accountant. I hope this helps.

            Thank you, bro.

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            Multiple circuits for every kitchen. Most kettles aren’t anywhere near 3 kW here in the States either – they’re typically around 1000 watts.

            • Chrispy_
            • 2 years ago

            Ouch. No 20 second fastboil kettles for your tea/coffee then?

            Are the separate circuits labelled in most US kitchens or do you just have to learn by trial and error which outlets can be used at the same time without tripping the breaker?

            Don’t get me wrong, the US is technologically ahead of much of Europe but when it comes to stuff like this you guys seem to hold onto dumb legacy crap way longer than is good for you.

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            Trial and error, generally. I’ve never tripped a breaker in the kitchen, every outlet (there are three in mine) is on a separate circuit.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      Please see my reply to brother Chrispy.

      Thanks, bro.

    • Anovoca
    • 2 years ago

    Sure it has an 80+ titanium rating , but what is its [url=https://techreport.com/news/31849/cybenetics-offers-a-second-opinion-on-psu-efficiency<]ETA Rating[/url<]?

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      ETA is unknown since Silverstone didn’t say, but they’ll probably be in stores soon 😉

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