G.Skill readies up for X299 with quad-channel DDR4 at 4200 MT/s

G.Skill just announced a whole range of quad-channel memory kits tailor-made for Intel's nascent X299 HEDT platform. The new kits are part of the company's top-tier Trident Z family, and they make use of Samsung's best DRAM chips to drive quad-channel DDR4 transfer rates up to 4200 MT/s. Not everyone can afford (or wants to pay for) the top-shelf grades, so G.Skill also has four- and eight-module kits coming out at transfer rates ranging down to 3600 MT/s.

As you can see in the handy-dandy chart above, all but one of these super-speed DDR4 kits require 1.35V, or an extra 150 mV over the DDR4-standard 1.2 V. The DDR4-4200 outlier requires a full 1.4V for good measure. Kits up to 3800 MT/s will be available in versions with 8 GB or 16 GB modules, meaning G.Skill can now outfit you with a full 128 GB of DDR4 memory transferring at 3800 MT/s. Latency does take a hit when using the denser modules, though.

Along with the existing Trident Z line and the Trident Z RGB family, G.Skill is launching the new kits in a "Trident Z Black" series that skips the fancy colors for a smooth all-black heatsink. The 4400 MT/s dual-channel kit we saw at Computex is also on its way, but unfortunately we don't know when. In fact, G.Skill didn't reveal when any of these kits will be arriving in stores, but we expect that to happen sooner rather than later.

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    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    I could put a few runs in some socks with that RAM.
    But it needs something more for real thread ripping.

    • jihadjoe
    • 3 years ago

    Fastest kit doesn’t come with blinkenlights. Boo.

    • Shobai
    • 3 years ago

    Some quick scribbled calcs suggest the 3600MT/s CL16 gear has the lowest effective latency. Don’t bother with the faster stuff, I guess, for an Intel build.

    What’s the fastest that Ryzen can run the IF?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      The 4000 CL18 stuff has the same effective CAS latency and higher throughput.

        • Shobai
        • 3 years ago

        Higher throughput sure – perhaps I was too hasty in my dismissal of the faster speed grades, if your application can benefit.

        Out of interest, how are you getting the same effective latency? 2*16/3.6 vs 2*18/4, no? Just under 9ns vs 9ns, as far as I can see.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          Well, I was doing 2*(16*(1/3600000000)), but yeah. I dunno, I was really tired when I made that post, haha. Although 8.8… and 9ns aren’t too far apart.

          Really the performance of the slowest DIMMs here versus the fastest DIMMs here aren’t likely to make much difference in anything, especially on X299 where you have quad-channel.

            • Shobai
            • 3 years ago

            All good =)

            I can’t see that the faster stuff is worth the price premium it will attract. I suppose there’s the chance that, if AMD’s current gen CPUs can attain increased performance due to a faster IF clock, then grabbing RAM that can allow that might be worthwhile. Otherwise, there doesn’t seem to be any point – especially so if selecting the ‘slower’ grade enables increased capacity or extra channels on a given build for a given budget.

    • synthtel2
    • 3 years ago

    That black looks so much nicer than the usual Trident Zs (and most of the rest of the bling-ridden RAM market). Now they just need to get that uselessly-large heatsink slimmed down.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    How fast can Ryzen run RAM at this point? Is there still the single rank vs dual rank issue?

    Edit – Wow, some jackass just downthumbing this post and all replies to it. Epyc!!!

      • DrDominodog51
      • 3 years ago

      3733 MHz is as fast as anyone has gotten. Ryzen’s memory controller can’t handle anything higher. A new stepping would be needed to increase speeds likely.

      It’s worth noting that the 4200 MHz memory won’t work on Kaby Lake without BCLK overclocking. Allegedly, the 4266 MHz strap can’t boot despite the memory controller being able to handle the high memory speed.

      • synthtel2
      • 3 years ago

      And has 1.0.0.6 let anyone break the 3200 barrier without the extra clock hardware?

        • DrDominodog51
        • 3 years ago

        Yes, but you have to modify some subtimings. Ryzen has some subtimings too tight and others too loose by default.

          • synthtel2
          • 3 years ago

          I can manage that. How high are people getting on normal boards?

            • DrDominodog51
            • 3 years ago

            The people who have normal boards aren’t the same people who are doing these subtiming tweaks to go above 3200 MHz :P.

            With good Samsung B-Die, one could probably hit ~3400 MHz. The silicon lottery will decide how far beyond that you can go.

          • ronch
          • 3 years ago

          Sounds like they have a way to go in terms of optimizing those timings.

      • jts888
      • 3 years ago

      I think what the Ryzen/Threadripper market needs more than just max-clocked DIMMs is some nice, >3000 MHz unbuffered ECC DIMMs.

      They should only cost ~12% max more to produce than an unbuffered, non-ECC module and could probably command a nice premium for people who want beefy workstations with amped-up IF clocks but also some degree of confidence they’re not passively scrambling their data.

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