Microsoft resurrects EMET to improve Windows 10 security

After the well-publicized WannaCry ransomware attack this spring, there's been some pressure on Microsoft to improve the security features of Windows 10. The company says that its customers have been asking for an integrated, comprehensive security tool that provides analysis and protection over and above what's currently baked into the operating system. To make that happen, Microsoft is reintroducing an old friend: the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET).

EMET will be reborn as the Windows Defender Exploit Guard, and it'll be one part of a suite of tools that Microsoft is calling the Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP). Exploit Guard will use insights from Microsoft's cloud-based analytics to implement rules and policies in order to mitigate the dangers of newly-discovered vulnerabilities. Windows Defender ATP will also provide tools for isolating infected machines from the rest of the network and easily implementing application control.

Microsoft's blog post on the subject doesn't make it entirely clear which bits of the whole security suite will be available to vanilla-desktop Windows 10. Some of the tools discussed here won't be available to regular Windows users, seeing they're oriented towards network-wide management and aimed at enterprise and government clients. A second blog post details Microsoft's plans to "extend Windows Defender ATP to also cover the Windows Server platform, starting with Windows Server 2012 R2 and 2016 releases." The Fall Creators Update will likely bring some extra protection for the rest of us, though.

Comments closed
    • psuedonymous
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]After the well-publicized WannaCry ransomware attack this spring, there's been some pressure on Microsoft to improve the security features of Windows 10.[/quote<] Which is a bit odd, as for the most part it was Windows 7 that were vulnerable and spread the infection. The only Windows 10 machines vulnerable were ones that were not kept updated. and there's little Microsoft can do to fix the "Nuh uh, not updating, gonna 'fix' the registry to stop auto updating! I don't get viruses!" crowd.

    • tootercomputer
    • 2 years ago

    Geez, what a weird advertisement. The acting was terrible, looked, umm, fake (have to think twice now before using that word), and the content was all platitudes and buzz words and yada yada yada. Who did MS get to make that commercial? Really, it’s terrible.

    • Kougar
    • 2 years ago

    Glad to see Microsoft at least trying to address this issue. Analytics might help contain the damage during outbreaks, though state-sponsored espionage tools will likely have a solution to deal with it.

    On the other hand considering WannaCry used Eternal Blue, a NSA statecraft hacking toolkit that could break into Windows 7 machines without user action, Microsoft is always going to fall on the losing end when it comes to state-sponsored hacking tools getting leaked to the darknet. The NSA chose to exploit rather than report on the vulnerability.

    • smilingcrow
    • 2 years ago

    I hope someone hacks this so that it gives a security message telling you to upgrade to Linux.

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      [url<]https://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2002/07/22[/url<]

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      I wouldn’t call that an upgrade.

        • smilingcrow
        • 2 years ago

        Neither would I which is part of the appeal.

      • B166ER
      • 2 years ago

      Why? So you can now be validated for being too secure? Like the old guy with dirty pants that walks by my beach saying the world will come to an end, and it finally does. Yeah, get your happy on.

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