Intel quietly introduces new Core i3 and Xeon models

Last week's announcement of the official release date and clock specifications of AMD's Ryzen 3 processors is probably the biggest news in the entry-level CPU market for the month of July, but Intel has some product introductions of its own to make. The company is adding four Core i3 desktop models and one four-core, eight-thread LGA 1151 Xeon variety to its CPU lineup, according to a specification update spotted by Anandtech.

To answer the question at the forefront of most gerbils' minds: none of the new models support overclocking. All three new chips have the same dual-core, four-thread design as all other Core i3 chips to date. The Core i3-7120 enters the fray clocked at 4.0 GHz and with 3 MB of L3 cache. It has a 51W nominal TDP. Its Core i3-7120T low-power sibling trades away 500 MHz worth of core clock in exchange for a lower 35 W TDP. The new 3.6 GHz, 35W Core i3-7320T model and its 4 MB of L3 cache have a similar relationship to the existing Core i3-7320. The i3-7320T's GPU Turbo clock is also 1100 MHz instead of 1150 MHz on the full-fat i3-7320.

Finally, the fresh Core i3-7340 has the same 4.2 GHz stock clock, 4 MB of L3 cache, and 1150 MHz GPU Turbo clock as the $168 Core i3-7350K, but it lacks the i3-7350K's overclocking capability. The TDP of this hot-clocked i3 is also 51W instead of the K chip's 60W. The four new Core i3 chips all share a S-0 stepping that is unique compared to the B-0 stepping of all existing Core i3 models.

The hot new Xeon is the E3-1285 v6, a four-core, eight-thread chip with a 4.1 GHz base clock, 4.5 GHz turbo clock, 8 MB of L3 cache, an HD P630 IGP, and a 91W TDP rating. These specs are quite similar to the popular Core i7-7700K, but the price will probably be quite a bit higher than the i7-7700K's $340 tag. The E3-1285 v6 will slot in above the 3.9 GHz, IGP-less E3-1280 v6, which trades for a heady $612.

Intel provided no pricing or availability information for the new chips, but that won't stop us from speculating. We would expect the Core i3-7120 and i3-7120 to be priced between the $117 Core i3-7100 and the $138 i3-7300. The Core i3-7320T will probably have the same $149 sticker as the existing i3-7320. Logic dictates that the Core i3-7340 will land somewhere between the Core i3-7320 and the $168 Core i3-7350K. The Xeon E3-1285 v6 will assuredly bear a larger price tag than the slower $612 Xeon E3-1280 v6.

Comments closed
    • HERETIC
    • 2 years ago

    I know as consumers we demand choices-choices-but-
    I see everything in between Pentium G4560 and i5 and Ryzen 1600,
    as pointless.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      I might argue that the $10-15 more expensive Pentium G4600 is a better choice than the G4560 for anyone who actually uses integrated graphics. The Pentium G4600’s CPU is only 100 MHz faster than the G4560, but its HD630 graphics unit is 50 MHz faster and has twice as many execution units as the HD610 graphics in the Pentium G4560.
      [url<]http://ark.intel.com/compare/97143,97453,97460,97455,97458,97484,97527,97147,97129[/url<]

        • pluscard
        • 2 years ago

        Ryzen 3 will have a built in Vega gpu. Contrast that to intels integrated graphics. Q3 should be interesting!

    • LoneWolf15
    • 2 years ago

    I can’t see the point in the extra i3 chips.

    Now if they had added 32MB of eDRAM for the HD 630, or something, I’d have seen something interest.

    I have one Kaby in my house, (an i5-7700T) and that’s for exactly two reasons: the HD 630’s improved video decode, and the 35w TDP for the T model make it a perfect HTPC chip. If it weren’t for those, a Skylake or Haswell would provide plenty of performance.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    If I were out for a chip in the $120-$180 price range I’d personally make a beeline for the Ryzen 1400. 4 cores with SMT. Sure, per thread may be weaker but this is practically a low-end unlocked i7 with a 65w TDP. Can’t go wrong with that.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]We would expect the Core i3-7120 and i3-7120 to be....[/quote<] I must've missed it, but what's the difference between these two potato chips?

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    The Pentium G4650 still blows all of these new chips out of the water.

    The extra $100+ at this budget-sensitive price point is [i<]waaaaaayyyyyy[/i<] better spent on SSD, RAM, or GPU upgrades than a few hundred MHz of silly Intel product segmentation.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 2 years ago

      The Core i3s also have hypethreading. There are some games that refuse to run on fewer than 4 cores now.

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        Well the Pentium has HT too now, but the difference is WAY under $100, and I would absolutely take the i3 every time. IMO

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          UK price difference between a 4GHz i3 7300 and 3.5GHz Pentium G4560 is £75 (aka $97 in the US).

          Sorry, I didn’t really try to check US store prices because you seem to have major stock problems with the Pentium over there.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      Right, both the Kaby Lake Pentiums and i3s are hyperthreaded (2C/4T) now, although FWIW the i3 adds a slightly faster iGPU, higher CPU clock, AVX extensions, and SmartCache.

      Usefulness of all the above depends on the application, of course.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      If you ask me, I’d spend the extra $100 to get a Ryzen 1400 instead. No silly product segmentation too.

    • lmc5b
    • 2 years ago

    “is adding four Core i3” – competition!
    Oh wait, 4 i3 models, not a quad core i3.
    Nevermind then.

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 2 years ago

      I read it wrong, too. Was super confused for a minute.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      If you want 4 cores at i3 prices you turn around and buy from the other vendor across the street.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Typical Intel. Don’t adjust pricing, just make more product segmentation. Not sure how they think this will improve their perf/$ competition against Ryzen.

      • Topinio
      • 2 years ago

      Yep. Coffee Lake 6-core 3.5 GHz+ E3 please, within £50 (=20%) of the Ryzen 5 1600X, compatible with excisting motherboards 😉

      • Klimax
      • 2 years ago

      Last time they adjusted pricing was during Netburst-era.

      Reminder: Should Intel adjust their pricing strategy now, AMD is gone. (Intel has large space for maneuvering, AMD doesn’t)

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      I think their strategy against Ryzen is to confuse the consumer so that direct comparisons become more difficult for most ordinary citizens.

      • maxxcool
      • 2 years ago

      It doesn’t have to adjust pricing yet .. they don’t have to yet. a great number of existing contracts are not expired yet so those roped into buying Intel only by either the OEM, or Intel direct STILL have to buy Intel.

      Add to that large scale businesses are NOT going to gamble on unproven tech and Intel has at least another 12 months of higher prices to profit from.

    • D@ Br@b($)!
    • 2 years ago

    Before I comment on this, I’m gonna read about the new Ryzen 3….

    • POLAR
    • 2 years ago

    Fee-fi-fo-fum,
    I smell the blood of a xeon foe,
    Be he alive, or be he dead
    I’ll rip his threads to make my bread.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      No wonder the TR4 socket is so yuuuuge.

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