Adata D16750 power bank is tougher than the average juice pack

There are plenty of power banks on the market these days, as battery life for mobile devices still isn't quite a solved problem. However, many of them aren't built to survive the kinds of environments where many owners would seem most likely to take a power bank. Adata's D16750 Power Bank fills this niche by providing an enormous battery inside of a chassis that's designed to take a beating and keep on charging.

Adata designed the D16750 power bank to survive environments more dangerous than a purse or briefcase. Its chassis is constructed of aluminum and silicone, and the company claims it passes IEC IP67 requirements for dust and waterproofing. This means that the bank meets the highest IEC standards for dust resistance, and it can purportedly survive being dunked in one meter of water for half an hour—provided that the cover for the USB ports is closed firmly.

At the heart of the D16750 is a 16750-mAh Li-ion battery constructed of power cells from LG. Together, the device's two USB ports can charge two devices simultaneously. One port is capable of outputting 2.4A, and the other 1.0A. Adata claims that the battery can recharge even the largest smartphones up to five times. The bank is further capable of charging its own batteries while juicing up a connected device. That big battery also powers the device's LED flashlight. All of these features could make the D16750 a useful camping companion.

Adata plans to release the D16750 power bank in August with silver, green, and blue color options. It'll sell on Amazon and Newegg for $60.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I just got a power bank from my aunt, an Infinity IP012 12,000mAh unit that has two 2.1A outputs. Curiously it has two inputs as well: a regular micro USB port and a Thunderbolt port. It’s crazy though, how after just a week of owning it and having only done one charge/discharge cycle, one of the output ports no longer works. It doesn’t seem to be merely loose; I think the problem could be an electronic component. The box is very nice and the housing of the power bank is very nicely done, but it’s too bad the quality of the internals seems … Subpar.

    Unfortunately this is a scenario that’s quite common with these be power banks. Flashy packaging, nice finish, crappy cells, components and ports.

    (Infinity seems to be a Hong Kong-based brand.)

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Looks like an external hard drive. Heh.

    • Lazier_Said
    • 2 years ago

    A power pack which can be dropped off a building without damage.

    With the sole function of recharging devices which can’t even be dropped off your desk without damage.

    Why?

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      The mobile device lives in my pocket. The spare battery pack gets tossed anywhere and might, for example, come rolling out of a backpack along with the jacket that was being pulled out.

      Unfortunately, this product has other design problems.

    • pandemonium
    • 2 years ago

    Important to note the [b<]Weight: 370g / 13.05oz[/b<]

      • smilingcrow
      • 2 years ago

      That was one of the first things I looked for due to the bulky look and a strange omission.

    • SuperSpy
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]and it can [i<]purportedly[/i<] survive being dunked in one meter of water for half an hour[/quote<] I see what you did there.

    • hungarianhc
    • 2 years ago

    I do everything I can to only buy USB-C things these days. My next battery will be USB-C.

    • cynan
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]One port is capable of outputting 2.4A, and the other 1.0A. [/quote<] WHY? It's got enough juice to charge 5 smart phones, and can do 2 at once... But sorry, we decided to save an extra 50 cents and only allow one to do a full charge in under 5 hours.

      • SuperSpy
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, and I get to explain to my parents why one port is special and charges 2.5x faster than the other, and they learn again to expect technology to be nonsensical.

      • rechicero
      • 2 years ago

      Because if you are not in a hurry is better for the battery life to charge more slowly. They offer you choice. I would never use the 2.4 A myself.

        • cynan
        • 2 years ago

        Sure, discharge rate has bearing on battery longevity and capacity. But I don’t really give that argument much bearing once you get past packs comprised of 1 or 2 cells (ie, 18650s – around 2000mah each). This thing looks to have 8 cells.

        With 16,750mah, A 1A discharge = 1/16.75 = ~0.06C current rate. A 2.4A discharge = 16.75/2.4 =~0.14C. I would be really surprised if there is significant differences in wear and capacity at such relatively low discharge rates (from looking at 18650 discharge curves). And especially differences that most users would want to trade for having to wait 2x+ as long to charge their device.

          • moose17145
          • 2 years ago

          I think you misunderstood. He said charge rate, not discharge rate.

          Pretty sure he was saying that it is better for the phones battery to charge more slowly than to cram a full charge into it in one hour.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    For reference, here’s a picture of an [url=https://images.samsclubresources.com/is/image/samsclub/0007630122229_A?wid=1500&hei=1500&qlt=80&op_sharpen=1<]average juice pack[/url<].

      • Anovoca
      • 2 years ago

      if only there was aluminum foil over the usb port when you first open it.

      • freebird
      • 2 years ago

      YES, but can it play Crysis???

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