Threadripper CPUs sneak into pre-built PC listings

Today seems to be Threadripper Day, because Velocity Micro isn't the only one launching machines based on AMD's new HEDT CPUs. Dell's Alienware division and boutique builders iBuyPower and CyberPowerPC have all put up listings for new Threadripper PCs. We already know that HP, Lenovo, and other tier-one OEMs won't be offering Threadripper-based machines this year, but we would expect that other PC boutiques will be offering machines based on AMD's 16-core behemoth. Here's the current list of pre-built Threadripper machines on the market.

In case you've been living under a rock (or simply aren't a PC hardware aficionado), Ryzen Threadripper is what AMD is calling its top-tier consumer-facing Ryzen CPUs. There are two models: the 1920X with 12 cores and 24 threads, and the 1950X with the full 16 cores and 32 threads. Both chips top out at 4.0 GHz using XFR. Threadripper CPUs are built using multiple "Zeppelin" dies—the chips that individually make up one of the standard AM4 Ryzen CPUs. Having more dies means more everything, so you end up with four 64-bit DDR4 memory channels and 64 lanes of PCI Express 3.0.

Dell's standard offerings are all in the form of massive Alienware Area-51 machines that come with liquid-cooling for the top-end Threadripper 1950X CPU, Windows 10 Home, and GeForce graphics cards. The cheapest configuration (not shown above) actually starts at $3,000. For that, you get 8 GB of DDR4 memory at 2667 MT/s and a GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB card.

Of course, Dell was one of the first to popularize built-to-spec PCs, so you can customize the machines with an impressive variety of options. Graphics card options range from a single GeForce GTX 1060 or Radeon RX 580 card all the way up to a pair of GeForce GTX 1080 Ti cards or a trio of Radeon RX 580s. Dell will gladly stuff 64GB of memory into the machine for you, as well as 1 TB SSDs and hard drives up to 2 TB. Surprisingly, Dell only offers one-year warranty as standard.

iBuyPower is a boutique vendor who deals in mostly-standard parts, and the the smaller seller's Threadripper options are unsurprisingly more varied. The company offers machines with both 1920X and 1950X CPUs inside. Notably, iBuyPower offers 3000 MT/s and 3200M T/s DDR4 memory in dual- and quad-channel configurations. You also have your pick of a proliferance of peripherals, including sound cards, fan controllers, color-coordinated cabling, and customized RGB LED lighting. However, the site won't sell you a three-way Crossfire rig. iBuyPower's Threadripper machines start at just $1,700.

Finally, Newegg already has three listings up for Threadripper-based machines from CyberPowerPC. The listings are quite bare, showing as "out of stock" and with no images, but they're there. The cheapest model, a $2,500 box called the Master Pro 100, comes with a Threadripper 1920X CPU, 16GB of memory, and a GeForce GTX 1070 card. This entry-level Threadripper box actually comes standard with an SSD-plus-HDD dual-storage configuration. That trend continues in the Panzer VR ($3,350) and Panzer VR Pro ($3,700) machines, both packing Threadripper 1950X CPUs and 32GB of memory. These two offerings differ primarily in storage and graphics card configurations.

We expect most readers of this site will be most interested in building their own Threadripper machines, but they'll to wait for retail availability of both boards and CPUs. AMD says the big-boy CPUs will hit shelves in "early August," so you may not have long to wait. Thanks to Videocardz for the tip.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I think Threadripper is very cool but personally I’m far more interested in both the 1500X and 1600X. The 1500X is essentially a low clocked i7 that you can get for $165-190 and the 1600X beats the pants off any i5 and is arguably better than the 7700K for much less money. Beyond that, the Ryzen 7 chips are interesting only if you were interested in 8-core Intel chips before Ryzen came out, otherwise it’s like you’re saying you need them only because they’re now within reach. Sorry, that can come off as a mean thing to say but it really is funny how folks are now saying they need more cores only because Ryzen is out, when they swore 8 cores is overkill when only the FX was out. Suddenly everyone needed a 400hp BMW when it started selling for $28,000.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    iBuyPower is quite the deal compared to Alienware, eh?

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Yep. Alienware’s more bland lower end desktops aren’t actually the horrible deals people assume, they’re the usual 150-200 over a home build, but the Area 51 is not that. ibuypower is pretty ok.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      [url=https://www.cyberpowerpc.com/page/AMD/Ryzen-Threadripper/<]CyberPower PC[/url<] seems to be in the middle.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Wait, $300 more for an additional 3GB of VRAM and 1TB more HDD space?

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      GTX1080 vs GTX1080Ti.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        Sorry, missed it.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    Good news Waco! The Threadripper has four RyZen dies!

    [url<]https://videocardz.com/71252/amd-ryzen-threadripper-delidding-by-der8auer-reveals-four-ryzen-dies[/url<] Bad news: Only two of them are ever turned on apparently, but... THERE ARE FOUR DIES!! It does confirm that our pal the Threadripper is literally just a rebinned Epyc, which actually surprises me a bit since I was expecting AMD to just not slap on the extra silicon in the first place. FYI AMD Fans: Be careful watching the video where Der8auer destroys a Threadripper. It might be a little too traumatic.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      AMD may want to learn a thing or two from Toyota about lean manufacturing.

        • tay
        • 2 years ago

        I feel like they are using up all the mm^2 of silicon (haha) that they promised GloFo that they would buy as part of the deal. Once they’re done, they can move to TSMC or Samsung. :p

        • just brew it!
        • 2 years ago

        If they’re using failed dies for the two “dummy” ones, it could be viewed as a smart move. Assuming they need something there anyway to spread out the mechanical load from the HSF mounting mechanism, why not use something they would otherwise throw away?

          • cegras
          • 2 years ago

          I wonder what is the defect rate for an entire die?

      • freebird
      • 2 years ago

      Who knows, maybe AMD has some “secret” upgrade plan in mind which I HIGHLY doubt, but IBM used to do that with some iSeries & maybe Power Series systems… you’d pay for so much for XXX amount of CPW (Commercial Processing Workload) and if you needed more for a Quarter or year end cycle you could bump it up for several months if you wanted…
      maybe because is was more economical building a 4-core (back then) module and offering in place performance upgrades by software…

      Still wish we were running an iSeries, still has lots of features that put vanilla Windows/SQL Server to shame, but I digress.

      Although, in the HEDT/workstation world, I really don’t see people embracing that since they are so used to “replacing the processor” in an upgrade scenario.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        IBM will happily ship you power systems with “one” CPU…and enable the second one via software when you pay the requisite licensing cost.

        They do the same thing with their mainframes.

      • Krogoth
      • 2 years ago

      Not really that surprising at all, but I suspect though that this is just a stop gap. Future batches of Threadrippers are going to be made with two dies on the packaging. The only way to tell without delidding the chip is through decoder ring based on the stepping and serial number.

      Intel did simliar things with some of its HEDT-tier chips back in the day. There were some Westmere chips that actually had eight-core die but two or four of the cores were disabled.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        I would give this bet 95% odds of being right.
        A 4 die sample reeks of an old engineering sample or the 2 die substrate not passing validation yet.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      Awww. I was hoping all four were active…so an Epyc chip could drop in and conceivably function.

      I still hope someone tests that out. 🙂

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        I made a forum thread just for you!

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    Oooh 8GB of RAM in a quad-channel system.

    #Can’tWait

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      They have to have the baseline low so they can bend you over the table on memory upgrades.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Bonus points if that’s a single 8GB stick of RAM in the low-end system.

        Which would at least prove that the Threadripper can boot with only a single channel of RAM.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          Who said anything about booting? I’m sure they’d sell it to you that way, though. 😆

          My 1700 system will not boot with a single DIMM. I have to have two very specific DIMM slots filled for my AB350-Gaming 3 to start up.

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            That’s actually very interesting.

            I’ve seen the occasional review where they run systems with reduced memory channels just to see how adding extra channels of RAM makes the system scale, but I’ve never seen it done on RyZen… maybe now I know why.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            Could be, or maybe it’s a peculiarity of the board or older AGESA versions. I haven’t done it since 1.0.0.6-based firmware came out.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          I think it is. The other machines say “dual-channel” or “quad-channel”, while the 8GB machine says nothing. lol.

      • cmrcmk
      • 2 years ago

      Lead loser.

        • freebird
        • 2 years ago

        U r right, I’m pretty sure all CPU production is “lead” free these days…

      • freebird
      • 2 years ago

      Are they trying to clear stock or something?

      I have some old 256MB ECC dimms I can sell them…

      From my dual Athlon MP system… 2 Thread sipper…

      • EzioAs
      • 2 years ago

      Dude, 8GB kinda looks like RGB, maybe that’s what they were going for since we all know how well RGB sells.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        Brilliant!

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Reminds me of when I had 4 x 2GB DDR3-1333 DIMMs in my Phenom II system. We, at least now this is quad channel. 🙂

        • Mr Bill
        • 2 years ago

        Ha, me too. Still do.

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