Vega goes pro on the Radeon Pro WX 9100 and Radeon Pro SSG

AMD led off its Vega assault by releasing two Vega Frontier Edition graphics cards at the very end of last month. The Frontier cards were aimed at a prosumer market in between the gaming-focused RX Vega and the true professional cards with certified drivers and similar perks. The red team has finally announced a pair of cards for the pro market: the traditional Radeon Pro WX 9100 and the new Radeon Pro SSG with 2 TB of solid-state storage on board.

The manufacturer says the Radeon Pro WX 9100 delivers up to 12.3 TFLOPS of single-precision performance and 24.6 TFLOPS of half-precision compute capability. The WX 9100 has 16 GB of 945 MHz HBM2 ECC memory on the same package as the GPU core, providing up to 484 GB/s of bandwidth. That WX9100's core contains the full complement of 64 Vega "Next Compute Units" and 4096 stream processors. That fleet of SPs operates at a boost clock of 1500 MHz. The base clock was not provided.

Pro users with their eyes on big pictures will likely appreciate the WX 9100's next-generation connectivity options. The card offers support for an 8K (7680×4320) display at up to 60 Hz, 4K (3840×2160) screens at 120 Hz, and support for up to six total displays through six mini-DisplayPorts.

Some members of the hardware enthusiast community were disappointed back in 2015 when AMD's Radeon R9 Fury cards were limited to a mere 4 GB of on-package memory. Some of the Radeon Technology Group's biggest customers must have had a need for a lot more memory. Last year's Fiji-powered Radeon Pro SSG piled 1 TB of solid-state storage on top of that 4 GB of HBM memory.

This year's Vega Radeon Pro SSG has 16 GB of ECC HBM2 and 2 TB of on-card NAND flash memory, managed by the Vega architecture's High Bandwidth Cache Controller. AMD says the SSG cards are intended to ease the limitations that current-generation hardware and storage impose on content creators working with 8K video footage and other enormous data sets in real time. The Radeon Pro SSG has the same performance specifications as the Radeon Pro WX 9100 and has the same I/O cluster with six mini-DisplayPorts.

AMD backs up the Radeon Pro WX 9100 card with a three-year standard warranty, which buyers can extend to up to seven years. The Radeon Pro SSG's warranty has a shorter two-year term, possibly owing to the limited lifespan of NAND flash memory. The company says the impressive hardware comes coupled with improved Radeon Pro Software Enterprise Drivers, which are updated the fourth Thursday of each calendar quarter. Both cards are expected to ship on September 13. The Radeon Pro WX 9100 will sell for $2199 and the unique Vega Radeon Pro SSG will set buyers back an eye-watering $6999.

Comments closed
    • mikewinddale
    • 2 years ago

    What does the 1 or 2 terabyte storage do? I’ve never heard of a graphics card with non-volatile storage. Is this related to some sort of professional video editing use case?

    Update: never mind. I found the answer here (https://techreport.com/news/30435/radeon-pro-solid-state-graphics-keeps-big-data-close-to-the-gpu): “‘solid state graphics’—a new kind of graphics card that’s meant to keep large amounts of data close to the GPU. This card has what AMD calls a “one-terabyte extended frame buffer” that relies on non-volatile memory to store all those bits—presumably NAND. . . . To demonstrate the benefits of keeping large data sets close to the GPU, AMD showed off a demo where an 8K file was scrubbed in the timeline in a pro video app. . . .”

    • willmore
    • 2 years ago

    What’s with the stain on that second picture? I think you’re taking the term ‘watermark’ a bit too far.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Some of the holi powder explosions tech companies are apparently in love with now got left on the card 😛

      [url<]http://www.amd.com/PublishingImages/photography/product/360px/9923-radeon-pro-ssg-blue-powder.jpg[/url<]

    • gerryg
    • 2 years ago

    “Red Team”? Seems like they got a case of the blues…

      • gerryg
      • 2 years ago

      And a nice blue at that, matches my Subaru Outback. 🙂

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 2 years ago

        Do you vape?

          • gerryg
          • 2 years ago

          Don’t even know what that is?

          • ultima_trev
          • 2 years ago

          WRX owner here. .. Do not vape.

          • DoomGuy64
          • 2 years ago

          SMOK all the way baby. Cloudbeast.

    • dpaus
    • 2 years ago

    ‘Eye-watering’?? We’ll be delivering 9x 4K displays in a 3×3 array, powered by 2 of these, this fall. And it’s about 1/40th the price of the competitor’s offering. Seriously.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      With six mini-DisplayPort outputs per card, you should upgrade your wall to a 4×3 array of monitors.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      You’re using the $7000 SSG parts as regular video cards?

      Additionally, I’m not saying that a “competitor” would necessarily be cheaper but 40x (which is $560,000) just to drive a video wall seems a little inflated.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Plus in fields like noninvasive underground mapping for natural resources, doing something 15% faster for 7000 dollars wouldn’t be blinked at.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    That SSG could use some further Optaneization.

    [Lol, I know the butthurt over Vega is vast, but I find it deliciously ironic that the same fanboys who worship HBM2 want to deny superior performance to AMD products simply because they consider Optane to be useless.]

      • DoomGuy64
      • 2 years ago

      Optane could be put in a SSG, but afaik it still hasn’t met useful capacity sizes, not to mention greater power use. I don’t think speed even matters when it comes to 2TB datasets, because the GPU would be more of a bottleneck than the cache, depending on what you’re processing.

      Basically, your “argument” is based more on bias than any technical merit.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 2 years ago

        Wait, why should a large dataset require less bandwidth?

          • stefem
          • 2 years ago

          Would be interesting to see his answer…

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Right now it’s a choice between 1x capacity of Optane vs 5X that amount for the same price in NAND. Since this is a 2TB card, evidently large datasets are important on it. At the same cost that would be ~0.4TB of Optane.

      Optane could be interesting on it for sure, but like most uses, probably 5x the NAND is still better for it. It’s like the early SSD stage right now, Optane will probably get more interesting in a few years.

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