Dell Precision 5820, 7820, and 7920 celebrate the brand’s 20 years

AMD wasn't the only company with big announcements at SIGGRAPH. Dell took the opportunity to announce that it's launching a whole new series of mid-range and high-end workstations as a celebration of the 20th anniversary of its Precision brand. The Precision 5820, 7820, and 7920 towers, as well as the 7920 rack, all feature the latest Xeon CPUs and can come strapped with high-powered graphics hardware. Dell is also launching a limited-edition commemorative version of its Precision 5520 mobile workstation.

The Precision 5820 is a single-socket tower workstation that takes Skylake-W Xeons (LGA 2066) with up to 10 cores, supports up to 256GB of ECC DDR4 at 2666 MT/s, and will accept a pair of high-end graphics cards. Dell is offering graphics cards options ranging from the lowly Nvidia NVS series all the way up to the recently-announced Radeon Pro WX 9100 and Radeon Pro SSG, as well as Nvidia's top-tier Pascal Quadro cards, the GP100 and P6000.

The larger Precision 7820 and 7920 machines are both dual-socket Xeon Scalable (LGA 3647) affairs, but that's where the similarity ends. In the Precision 7820 you can install a pair of Xeon Platinums with 28 cores per socket, but "only" 384GB of 2666 MT/s ECC DDR4. Meanwhile, the Precision 7920 can accomodate up to 3TB of the same memory if you pick the right CPUs. The smaller 7820 will accept two high-end graphics cards like the 5820 tower above, but the 7920 will take in up to four cards (although Dell says the maximum power draw totals 750W). 

Dell will also offer the Precision 7920 in a rack-mounted configuration that only has room for three dual-slot graphics cards in its 2U enclosure. However, it can provide up to 300W to each one. Given its form factor, the rack version of the Precision 7920 has extra iDRAC9 remote management hardware and comes with quad-port Gigabit Ethernet as standard.

Finally, the Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition is an 11-mm-thick laptop (0.43") with a Core i7-7820HQ CPU, M.2 PCIe storage, and a Quadro M1200 discrete GPU. The specific configuration that Dell recommends comes with 8GB of 2400MT/s DDR4 memory (filling one of two SO-DIMM slots), a 256GB SSD, and a 15.6" 3840×2160 IGZO display. The laptop itself isn't new, but the Anniversary Edition comes with a "hard anodized aluminum, brushed metallic finish" in a color that Dell calls "Abyss."

Dell says the new Precision workstations will be available in October. The Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition laptop is available now, and the base configuration starts at $2180. Of course, like most of what Dell sells, all of the aforementioned hardware is highly configurable. Hit up Dell's Precision Anniversary site if you want the full deets on the available configurations.

Comments closed
    • freebird
    • 2 years ago

    Hopefully they also offer a power supply upgrade…
    ” …the 7920 will take in up to four cards (although Dell says the maximum power draw totals 750W). ”

    750W does not sound good enough for 4 higher-end GPUs, Dual CPUs & gobs of memory. 4x150w GPUs would only leave 150w for 2 CPUs, memory & chipset mobo power… NOT enuf.

    If not I would assume everyone should just buy the 7820, unless you need the “gobs” of memory, with the 7820 limited to 384GB.

    • dme123
    • 2 years ago

    The main point of the Precision 5520 over an XPS15 is for people who need a Quadro for compatibility and support purposes but don’t want to carry one of the absolute paving slab mobile workstations that otherwise come with them. It’s a small niche, but I’m glad they’ve filled it! It sucks that this year the 5520 has the older Maxwell based GPU while the XPS15 gets a Pascal GTX1050. I’m sure next years inevitable 5530 will get a GPU upgrade.

    You also get better warranty options and faster CPU options. Mine has a 5 year NBD on site warranty and accidental damage cover. Base warranty is 3 years NBD on these. Standard XPS15 warranty is 1 year Collect & Return, and the upgrade options are limited and expensive.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      I wish I had one like half our office got, rather than the 6.5 pound M4800. Performance isn’t dissimilar, weight is.

        • dme123
        • 2 years ago

        Ooof bad luck, they really are hefty old beasts.

    • nico1982
    • 2 years ago

    Not specifically about this Anniversary Edition products, but Dell should really offer a few different alternatives to their “Corporate Dull Gray” color option. “Alternative Snow White” might be a start…

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    No thread ripper? No Epyc. God Dell is such an Intel shill.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      I had thought Dell has done a good job of embracing Ryzen and Threadripper. They have an all-AMD 27″ AIO which is not aimed at the cheap end of the market, TR even had it in their news. Also the exclusive Threadripper deal with Alienware.

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        They have a budget gaming desktop that got some attention, that is all AMD.

        [url<]https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/30/15698476/dell-inspiron-gaming-desktop-announced[/url<]

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    I’ll pay extra for intentionally defective electrolytic caps that make for — shall we say — “interesting” behavior before the system eventually burns to the ground.

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      Only if the power supply connector uses a standard ATX Molex with non-standard pinout. Otherwise, it’s not a true classic!

      • Leader952
      • 2 years ago

      What are you talking about?

      Do you have examples of Dell Precision Workstations having capacitor issues.

      I have been using T5600, T7600. T1650 and T1700 Precision Workstations and have never had a problem with capacitors.

      In fact these systems are some of the best manufactured workstations and are worlds better than HP or Lenovo. Also the Power Supply self test (via the button) and the system built in diagnostics are first class.

        • ludi
        • 2 years ago

        Dell is “celebrating 20 years,” hence the remeniscing about some of the company’s pecularities over that 20 years. In particular, Dell was hit hard by the Capacitor Plague from the late ’90s to the mid-00s, and ended up spending about a half-billion dollars on warranty motherboard replacements.

        • BillyBuerger
        • 2 years ago

        We had probably 20 Precision 390s at our office at one point. I think I have one left and the caps are bulging so it’s only a matter of time before that one goes the way of the others. Dell has had issues with caps in some models. But it doesn’t mean all of them do.

          • Leader952
          • 2 years ago

          Talk about ancient tech. Pentium D and Extreme Edition processors and the Core processors (not the Core 2).

          [url<]https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/products/precn/en/spec_precn_390_en.pdf[/url<] Back then was a dark time in system designs with hot (as in heat) processors and FB-DDR2 that you could cook eggs on as in the Dell T5400/T7400. I was referring to the systems from Sandy Bridge (T5600, T7600) to the current generation.

            • BillyBuerger
            • 2 years ago

            The 390s we had used Core2Duo E6750. Also had a couple 380s with Pentium EEs. Those actually seemed to hold up better then the 390s. But yeah, old stuff.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    Ugh, the Quadro M1200.

    Another way of saying, “YEAH, WE’VE GOT A BAZILLION GTX 750Ti CHIPS STILL TO SELL. GET READY FOR THE REBRAND OF THE CENTURY AND OPEN THY WALLETS”

      • thecoldanddarkone
      • 2 years ago

      While I understand where this is coming from. At least the model number didn’t go higher than the m2000 (exact same thing except clocks, for those who don’t know). Weirdly enough, I just purchased a laptop with an m2000 (edit) and e3-1505mv5.

      At least the videocard is labeled correctly. The optional xeon 1505m v6 specs are incorrect.

      Those are the xeon 1505m v5 specs, newbs.

      Intel Core Xeon E3-1505M v6 (Quad Core Xeon 2.80GHz, 3.70GHz Turbo, 8MB 45W, w/Intel HD, Anniv Ed)

      [url<]https://ark.intel.com/products/97463/Intel-Xeon-Processor-E3-1505M-v6-8M-Cache-3_00-GHz[/url<]

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Regardless of the rebranding, there’s no reason to use outdated 3.5 year old silicon in a brand new, power-efficient, thin laptop. The old silicon drains the super-slim battery faster, and puts more strain on the ultra-compact cooling for more fan noise and shorter fan lifetime.

        Seriously, the GP108 has been out almost four months now and does what the old GM107 does for much lower power draw. When you’re spending $2180 for a brand new laptop, would you not be angered that Dell saved $10 on the GPU to use up some nearly-4-year-old stock and ruin your power and thermals?

        It’s stupid, IMO.

    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    No commemorative beige cases? Come on, Dell, you’re not even trying.

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