Noctua offers up a trio of big-booty heatsinks for Threadripper

In case you haven't heard, AMD's Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are huge. Enormous, even. The cause for their magnificent bigness is that they are formed from four silicon dies underneath that big plate of aluminum and nickel (even though only two are actually active.) That means the area of the Threadripper CPU that is generating heat is more spread-out than your typical desktop CPU, or even that of Intel's high-end parts. To address this issue, Noctua has created special Threadripper-specific editions of its NH-U9, NH-U12S, and NH-U14S CPU coolers.

Noctua NH-U14S TR4-SP3

Noctua's new coolers are pragmatically-named: the company simply affixes "TR4-SP3" to the end, giving us the NH-U9S TR4-SP3, NH-U12S TR4-SP3, and NH-U14 TR4-SP3. For the most part, these are the same 92-mm, 120-mm, and 140-mm tower coolers we know and love from Noctua. However, the Austrian company says that the baseplates of the new coolers—that is, the copper contact surfaces below the fin stack—are more than twice the size of the standard models.

Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3

Those beefed-up baseplates are sufficiently spacious to cover the entire Threadripper heat-spreader, and that means the maximum thermal transfer from CPU socket to CPU cooler. Thanks to the valiant CPU-murdering sacrifice of pro overclocker der8auer, we know that Threadripper CPUs will have their heat-spreaders soldered down. Given the 180W TDP of the top-tier Threadripper chips, that means there will be plenty of heat to remove from the CPUs.

Noctua NH-U9 TR4-SP3

Despite the size, though, Noctua says the new coolers shouldn't cause clearance issues, even in multi-GPU systems that make use of the first PCIe slot. That's thanks to these coolers' new "SecuFirm2" mounting system. SecuFirm2 has provisions to allow builders to slightly offset the CPU cooler by 3 or 6mm to accomodate for devices that encroach on the CPU socket. SecuFirm2 is also also compatible with the rather similar SP3 socket used by AMD's EPYC server CPUs.

SecuFirm2 mounting adjustment

The mark-up over the standard models is surprisingly small: the NH-U9 TR4-SP3 and the NH-u12S TR4-SP3 will run $70, while the NH-U14S TR4-SP3 will set you back $80. Noctua says the customized coolers will begin shipping "shortly" and should be available at e-tail "towards the end of August."

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]SecuFirm2 has provisions to allow builders to slightly offset the CPU cooler by 3 or 6mm to accomodate for devices that encroach on the CPU socket.[/quote<] Noctua: Doing God's work. /atheist.

    • gigafinger
    • 2 years ago

    I’ve owned the same Noctua NH-U12S cooler for the past 6+ years and it has performed great on two different, mildly overclocked Intel platforms. They even sent me a free mounting kit when I upgraded. Money well spent in my book.

    • Shobai
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Thanks to the valiant CPU-murdering sacrifice of pro overclocker der8auer, we know that Threadripper CPUs will have their heat-spreaders soldered down. Given the 180W TDP of the top-tier Threadripper chips, that means there will be plenty of heat to remove from the CPUs.[/quote<] Did you intend to say that "soldered heat-spreaders" means "plenty of heat to remove"? I suggest reworking the paragraph to drop the der8auer sentence - you're trying to tie "maximal thermal transfer" to "180W TDP", and that sentence is just getting in the way.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      No… the 180W TDP means plenty of heat to remove.

      der8auer is the one who exposed to the world that AMD is using a soldered heat spreader to remove it. (As opposed to Intel-style TIM for example.)

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        My apologies, you’ve missed the point.

        The second sentence, while true, is a filler sentence which adds nothing to the article, but detracts from clear communication. If Zak didn’t want to suggest that soldered heat spreaders mean plenty of heat, he should have written:

        ‘The 180W TDP of the top tier Threadripper chips means that there…’, or ‘Given the 180W…, there…’.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Heh, it’s not great. It’s pretty easily fixed when you rearrange the paragraph, though:[quote<] Given the 180W TDP of the top-tier Threadripper chips, there will be plenty of heat to remove from the CPUs, and thanks to the valiant CPU-murdering sacrifice of pro overclocker der8auer, we know that Threadripper CPUs will have their heat-spreaders soldered down. Those beefed-up baseplates are sufficiently spacious to cover the entire Threadripper heat-spreader. All that combined means the maximum thermal transfer from CPU socket to CPU cooler.[/quote<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            One could argue that the two are related, though. If the heat spreader wasn’t soldered, the heat couldn’t be removed as efficiently.

            • Shobai
            • 2 years ago

            Related, definitely, but it’s more nuanced than that – see Intel’s justification for not soldering their own high dissipation CPUs. As such, better to leave it at “Noctua’s redesigned baseplate looks to be up to the task of efficiently dealing with as much heat as makes it to Threadripper’s soldered heat spreader”.

            I, for one, openly acknowledge that I am in no way qualified to critique AMD or Intel for their choice of TIM or solder.

    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    that’s a whole lotta junk in da trunk!

    • kvndoom
    • 2 years ago

    [url=http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086856/<]BIG-BOO-TAY! TAY! TAY![/url<]

    • ludi
    • 2 years ago

    I’m holding out for the NH-U14 TR4-SP3 XLT-Hemi Type R Series III with the ‘S’ option code and the racing stripes. Mostly to see if the label still fits on the back, and because I like a challenge when I debadge.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    OMG Becky look at her butt.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      It’s just so… taupe.

      (WTF do you call Noctua’s fan color-scheme anyway? Beige-and-rust? Paste-y and oxidize-y? Boring and brown?)

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        I call it “weird.” No denying Noctua’s design chops – they make great stuff – but it looks so out of place in a PC when everything else is black, white, red, and RGBLED.

        • Ultraken
        • 2 years ago

        I always thought of it as “Three Musketeers Bar”. Chocolatey!

          • tay
          • 2 years ago

          My favorite! Now I’m hungry

        • CuttinHobo
        • 2 years ago

        Is “1989 computer case after a few years of hard livin'” a color? For the lighter color, anyway.

        • Tumbleweed
        • 2 years ago

        “Intel pants-shitting brown”, I think it’s called.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 2 years ago

        I always think of it as 80s Lotus:

        [url<]http://www.lotusespritturbo.com/Lotus_Esprit_S1_Interior.jpg[/url<]

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          Oh, that’s…

      • CuttinHobo
      • 2 years ago

      Fat bottom heatsinks make the rockin’ fan go ’round!

        • K-L-Waster
        • 2 years ago

        If your CPU fan is a’rockin you got too much a’knockin in that system case…

        • superjawes
        • 2 years ago

        I think you mean:

        “Fat bottom heatsinks make the [b<]overclockin'[/b<] world go 'round!"

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Gonna borrow that line for a moment.

        OHHHHHHH won’t you rip my threads tonight
        OHHHHHHH down beside RGB light
        OHHHHHHH and you’ll clock for all you got
        Fat bottom ‘sinks, you make the rockin’ fan go ’round

          • CuttinHobo
          • 2 years ago

          Nice!

          To misquote Total Recall: I wish I had more thumbs!

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      You other brothers can’t deny!

      • Redocbew
      • 2 years ago

      It’s just so….. out there.

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