Fractal’s Define C and Mini C show off through glass

We were impressed enough with Fractal's Define C enclosure to tag the compact ATX case with an Editor's Choice badge when we reviewed it. The Define Mini C variant brings the same design elements into an even smaller box for those who prefer microATX motherboards. Previously, Fractal offered versions of the Define C and its mini-me sibling with the buyer's choice of an acrylic window or a fully opaque panel with additional sound insulation. The company is now adding a third panel option for both models with the material of choice for 2017, tempered glass.

The tempered glass variations of the two Define Cs are otherwise unchanged. Both cases can still be stuffed with 280-mm radiators in the front panel, a 240-mm unit in the top, and a 120-mm heat exchanger in the back. Buyers can put fans in all those locations plus another 120-mm spinner in the bottom of the case. CPU cooler towers up to 6.8" (17.2 cm) can fit, as can power supplies of the same length and graphics cards up to 12.4" (31.5 cm) with the front fans in place.

Both cases fit the same array of three 2.5" storage devices and two 3.5" drives. Luddites still playing media from optical discs will need a USB Blu-Ray drive, as the tempered glass models don't add any external drive bays to the slab-faced Define Cs.

Much like the previous models, the only difference between the tempered-glass Define C and Define Mini C is the motherboard support. The glass Define C can take in ATX mobos and their seven expansion slots, while the Define Mini C makes do with microATX boards and five slots.

The Fractal Design Define C TG is priced at $95 at Newegg. The smaller glass-clad Define C Mini TG costs $5 less, at $90. As a reminder, gerbils too lazy for cable management can pick up opaque versions of the same cases for quite a few bucks less. The company didn't mention a fur-covered version, though.

Comments closed
    • MHLoppy
    • 2 years ago

    (Slight typo on “panel” in the last sentence of the first paragraph)

    • Sigma0004
    • 2 years ago

    So desiring to place a M-Disc capable BDXL Burner in every single one of my machines makes me a Luddite?

    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

    Pretty Case otherwise, just not to my taste.

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 2 years ago

      I don’t know. I feel the same then built a PC for my daughter. Just forgot to add a DVD/BR drive. My daughter has not complained in 3 months, so I guess they are not useful anymore.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Most english dictionaries list the word ‘Luddite’ as both the 19th century industrial vandals and also as the derogatory term used for someone who resists technological change.

      Not only have you refused to allow fibre internet and portable USB storage to supersede vastly-inferior optical media, you also seem unwilling to accept the new extended definition of the word Luddite.

      I can think of no better irony right now.

        • Sigma0004
        • 2 years ago

        If fibre internet existed in my area, I would not rely so heavily on BDXL. Although I would still use BDXL M-discs as go to for the cold storage (archival) option.
        But my choices for internet services are limited to Bellsouth DSL (3Mbps) or Hughesnet.

        This unfortunately means that Sneakernet is the better choice in most cases for moving Terabytes of data (Especially if can you get it done cheaply).

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          Ouch, your internet options suck.

          If you value your time just switch to portable 2.5″ USB drives. They’re ~10x faster, half the cost/GB and you can rewrite them. The upfront cost is higher than individual BDXL discs, but the break-even point is only like 8 discs or something like that.

    • EzioAs
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]The company is now adding a third [b<]pnael[/b<] option...[/quote<] Minor typo in first paragraph.

    • mkk
    • 2 years ago

    Excellent.
    Now all I need is a slightly wider version that sports a 140mm exhaust, and a tray for six or so SSD’s under that silly shroud.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      You can already do 5 SSDs… plus whatever M2 drives your mobo can handle.

        • mkk
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, but I already counted in the two places behind the mobo for a total of eight. 😉

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      So what you mean, is you need a different model altogether? 🙂

        • mkk
        • 2 years ago

        I’m mostly miffed about putting a 140mm exhaust on a tower in 2017. 🙂

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          But the exhaust is usually narrower because the motherboard IO shield eats up space that the fan would occupy in other positions like the roof or the front panel.

          Essentially, any fan wider than 80mm next to the IO shield means that the case will be wider than a 5.25″ bay or ATX PSU for no good reason. Apart from allowing huge tower coolers that space is wasted when it comes to drive bays, GPUs, the PSU, etc and you’ve got to remember that 120 and 240mm AIO coolers are by far the most popular models, and it’s their radiators compatibility that drives the ATX case industry.

          If you want a huge case with loads of clearance, then there are plenty of those on the market, but please don’t gripe on normal size cases, especially not mATX ones with the word “mini” in their product name!

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