Happiness Happens Day Shortbread

PC hardware and computing

  1. BitFenix Shogun tempered glass enclosure review @ PC Perspective
  2. Acer Predator Z301CT monitor review @ Tom's Hardware
  3. Kingston DCP1000 NVMe SSD enthusiast testing in RAID 0 @ The SSD Review
  4. Ryzen 3: the ultimate gaming benchmark guide @ TechSpot
  5. AUDIOCASE portable speaker review @ TechPowerUp
  6. Corsair One Pro 1080 Ti compact gaming PC review @ Legit Reviews
  7. PNY GTX 1080 Ti XLR8 OC Gaming 11GB review @ KitGuru
  8. Reviews—Corsair TX750M (2017) 750W @ JonnyGuru
  9. AMD Ryzen Threadripper coldplate mounting and mating @ HardOCP
  10. The G.Skill KM570 ΜΧ mechanical keyboard review: sturdy & efficient @ AnandTech
  11. Exclusive: Ryzen Threadripper 1950X performance first look with Alienware Area-51 Threadripper Edition @ HotHardware

Science, hacks, makers and gadgets

  1. "Driverless van" is just a VT researcher in a really good driver’s seat costume @ ArsTechnica
  2. 3D printing flexible surfaces out of non-flexible material @ Hack A Day
  3. China built the world's largest telescope, but has no one to run it @ ArsTechnica
  4. "Sleeping" dinosaur fossil so well preserved it still sports skin and scales @ New Atlas (everyone can stop looking, the best fossil on the planet has been found)

Tech news and culture

  1. Elon Musk's Hyperloop is doomed for the worst reason @ Slashdot
  2. InstantCAD promises faster iterative design @ Hack A Day (any FEA buffs around?)
  3. MegaBots Inc debuts its combat-ready giant fighting robot @ New Atlas
  4. Amazon patent is all aboard for launching delivery drones from moving trains @ New Atlas (love those sketches)

Cheese, memes, and RGB LEDs

  1. Matthew Rubiner: 'there's no lactose in cheese!' @ berkshireeagle.com
  2. Cheese whiz earns blue ribbon at fair @ columbian.com
  3. Cryorig H7 Quad Lumi RGB air cooler review @ KitGuru
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • Aquilino
    • 2 years ago

    [i<]Amazon patent is all aboard for launching delivery drones from moving trains @ New Atlas (love those sketches)[/i<] Someone has been playing a bit of Factorio around Amazon...

    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    why is she smiling like that?

      • drfish
      • 2 years ago

      ’cause happiness happens?

      • iBend
      • 2 years ago

      Because she ride a bull with long horn

    • CScottG
    • 2 years ago

    Within the past weak (or so from news sources), two of the more important advances in technology have happened (though as typical are not “to market”) that could/should have rather *huge* ramifications for humanity:

    Cheap Hydrogen production:
    [url<]https://www.newscientist.com/article/2142693-nano-aluminium-offers-fuel-cells-on-demand-just-add-water/[/url<] Tissue Regeneration: [url<]https://news.osu.edu/news/2017/08/07/regenerative-med-study/[/url<]

    • oldog
    • 2 years ago

    It is a statement of fact that there is no lactose in cheese, however there are a small but real number of people who are “allergic/sensitive” to milk proteins.

    The true allergies often present in early childhood and may be as much as 2% of the population. So if you find cheese and milk problematic it may have nothing to do with lactose intolerance.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]PNY GTX 1080 Ti XLR8 OC Gaming 11GB review @ KitGuru[/quote<] I have this card and it is pretty nice. Only problem is they seem to not exist anywhere anymore so no hopes for SLI.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    In other news coffee lake is coming August 21st.
    [url<]https://newsroom.intel.com/news-releases/media-alert-introducing-new-8th-gen-intel-core-processor-family/[/url<]

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      In other other news:
      [quote<]At any rate, it's not going to be long until we know more, seeing as Intel's set to debut its 8th-generation Core CPUs on August 21.[/quote<] [url<]https://techreport.com/news/32366/rumor-core-i3-8350k-and-core-i3-8100-cpus-pop-up[/url<]

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    That dinosaur fossile is amazing.

      • drfish
      • 2 years ago

      It really, [i<]really[/i<] is!

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    ServeTheHome has an intersting first-take on Epyc: [url<]https://www.servethehome.com/dual-amd-epyc-7601-processor-performance-and-review-part-1/#comment-460968[/url<] The most interesting benchmark is at the end with a GROMACS test that finally uses AVX-512... let's just say that Intel is shipping out those 8180 Xeons for a reason.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      AVX-512 is a monster.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        This is one major reason why I’m more excited about Skylake X in the long term vs. The Threadripper. The software that actually utilizes Skylake X is just starting to show up and that’s where the interesting stuff lies.

        Interestingly enough, that quad-8180 system was apparently not being stressed enough by the test so they are coming up with a bigger test to truly put it through its paces. Additionally, as a point of reference the dual Epyc systems have about 45% more cores than the dual Broadwell system while the quad-8180 has 57% more cores than the dual Epyc.

          • Waco
          • 2 years ago

          Until AVX becomes widespread (I’m looking at you, Intel) I wouldn’t worry too much about AVX-512 taking over. It’s a very niche thing for very very particular workloads.

            • UberGerbil
            • 2 years ago

            Even if Intel stopped turning the product-segmentation knobs and shipped it in everything, it will [i<]still[/i<] be a very niche thing for very very particular workloads.

            • Waco
            • 2 years ago

            AVX-512, yes. AVX? It’s long in the tooth and modern software still ships without AVX support enabled. It’s a lot easier to just compile with the flag on and get a free performance boost when you know your customers all have AVX on their chips.

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            AVX-512 may not be used everywhere but at least on major category of benchmark that a lot of people care about around here is media encoding, and the x265 people have certainly been enthusiastic about the Purley platform in media encoding: [url<]http://x265.org/x265-receives-significant-boost-intel-xeon-scalable-processor-family/[/url<] Blender will be (and already is to some extent in Linux where it is optimized properly) another application that's regularly tested in TR's reviews where AVX-512 will make a mark. As for OpenSSL, there's no reason it shouldn't be able to use AVX-512 when they get around to it although in servers the offload capability to a 100Gbit Quick Assist chipset is probably more interesting (and needs more testing).

            • smilingcrow
            • 2 years ago

            Intel’s free Performance Libraries support AVX-512:
            [url<]https://software.intel.com/en-us/performance-libraries[/url<]

      • tsk
      • 2 years ago

      Well as they say in the article
      “From a price perspective, AMD and Intel are going to compete in the single and dual socket markets between the Intel Xeon Bronze and Gold lines. The Platinum SKUs are Intel’s low volume highly specialized tools. That is why we pulled results from most of the charts above. While a $3300 and a $4200 CPU may compete in some markets, a $4200 and $10000 CPU are unlikely to compete.”

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        That’s why the GCC benchmark with the $3300 Xeon Gold 6150 vs. the more expensive Epyc 7601 is quite interesting too. Although in HPC workloads the price performance ratio of the Platinum actually isn’t bad given what it can do.

        As for CPU price, it’s one part, but not the only part by a very very long shot, in overall system price. I generally agree that in most situations the highest-end Epyc parts will be competing against Xeon Golds and the lower-end of the Platinum range, but it’s still fun to see what Skylake can do when the brakes are turned off.

          • willmore
          • 2 years ago

          That’s the *only* benchmark an Intel processor won.

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            I’d go look at the GROMACS benchmark at the bottom of that review if you think it’s the ‘only’ win.

            Furthermore, on a per-core basis that cheaper Xeon Gold easily won.

            • willmore
            • 2 years ago

            Are you refering to the dual $10K box they included as a reference?

            Per thread or per core are an interesting metric, but not a benchmark.

            • chuckula
            • 2 years ago

            No, I’m referring to the dual socket Broadwell system that’s pretty old with chips that cost about the same as the Epyc chips but that has noticeably lower overall platform costs since it doesn’t require 8 channels of memory just to boot up.

            Given that it has a 45% core count disadvantage and is using slower DDR4 memory since it is an old platform, it’s [b<]EXTREMELY[/b<] impressive that Epyc still hasn't caught up in GROMACs, which is yet another benchmark win for old Broadwell (Epyc also lost outright in compiling). Did you think I was referring to those Xeon Platinums that nobody actually pays $10K each for? Of course not. They do kick ass as well, believe me, but for an old platform that AMD has disparaged pretty badly I'd never consider upgrading from Broadwells to Epycs.

            • smilingcrow
            • 2 years ago

            Broadwell is hardly old, being released April 2016 and replaced at retail (on paper seemingly) less than a month ago. So at retail it seems to still be the most currently available.

          • the
          • 2 years ago

          The interesting Xeon parts have yet to really appear: the stuff with additional on package logic. Much like the Phi line up, Intel is supposed to offer chips with on package Omnipath interconnect. Intel announced early but have seemingly been dropped (or made OEM/partner only) are models with on package FPGA. Similarly, Intel has talked about Nervena technology appearing in a Xeon socket though that maybe targeted for a refresh in 2018.

          When this additional models start appearing, I see Intel starting to wage a price war as those niche features can justify a strong premium. The more general purpose Xeon’s are then free to compete directly with AMD on price.

          Things haven’t been this exciting in the server space since the first Opterons arrived to shakes things up.

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