ROG Rampage VI Extreme and Apex boards go all-out

Just in time for the full reveal of Intel's Core i9-series processors, Asus has a second salvo of top-tier X299 motherboards ready to fire off. The boys with the hard-to-pronounce name have two new mobos: the ROG Rampage VI Extreme and Rampage VI Apex. As you likely expect, both models are E-ATX exhibitions of Asus' finest engineering. What might surprise you is that these boards don't share the same basic design with different feature tiers—rather, they're designed with different philosophies and purposes in mind.

The Rampage VI Extreme is an example of "everything and the kitchen sink" motherboard design, and as a result it should be able to service almost any builder's needs. It comes with three M.2 slots, a U.2 port, three USB 3.1 connectors, and four-way Crossfire and SLI support. It also has an Aquantia-powered 10 Gb Ethernet port along an Intel I219V controller, support for 802.11ad WiGig connectivity, and Bluetooth 4.1. Audio output comes by way of an S1220 codec coupled with ESS Sabre DACs.

Meanwhile, the Rampage VI Apex was purpose-built for a different interest, and that is to be the X299 overclockers' dream. This board was built to break overclocking records, and to that end it packs only four DIMM slots, has switchable dual BIOS chips, a toggle for an "LN2 mode," and special connectors for extra thermal sensors. The board even has bare connection points for hardcore tweakers to use a multimeter on, a feature that Asus calls "ProbeIt." The Rampage VI Apex skips the nifty networking features of the Extreme, but still offers an Intel-powered Ethernet port, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 4.2.

Asus says both of these bodacious boards will be available "shortly" in North America, and suggests that the Rampage VI Extreme will go for $650, while the Rampage VI Apex will set you back $430.

Comments closed
    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Meanwhile, the Rampage VI Apex was purpose-built for a different interest, and that is to be the X299 overclockers' dream. [/quote<] Hey! "Overclocker's Dream" is trademarked to AMD! Don't make Lisa Su Sue You!!

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      [deleted]

      The internet doesn’t deserve my dumb jokes. Sorry.

        • drfish
        • 2 years ago

        He’s trying to pull a funk, get him!

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I’M RUINING TECH REPORT AND I DON’T EVEN WORK HERE

          • DPete27
          • 2 years ago

          I actually wasn’t…. I was genuinely embarrassed by my attempt at a joke.

        • Mr Bill
        • 2 years ago

        ‘I am not funny’ meme unlocked!

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Ugh, the RGB-ness of that Rampage Extreme. Why don’t they just skip the formalities and just replace those RGB panels with user-programmable LCD screens?

    OHOH, I do like the concept of the integrated IO shield. Never understood why those needed to be separate anyway. They always got lost or bent.

    • ermo
    • 2 years ago

    I don’t know how much has changed in the world of wireless networking recently (802.11ac/ad compared to 802.11n for instance) , but in my experience, if you’re serious about gaming online, you’d do well to use a cabled connection and a router that implements bufferbloat mitigation features?

    Given that ROG stands for Republic Of Gamers, why do these boards include WiFi?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      It could be argued that these boards are not for people who know better. It alternatively could be argued that WiGig and such are “good enough”. In any case, you don’t HAVE to use the Wi-Fi, and having it is a convenience for other purposes. When seriously competing you could use the GbE (or 10GbE in case of the Extreme), and when fooling around at a LAN, or transferring files, or whatever, you could use the Wi-Fi.

      Really if you’re asking this question you’re probably not in the target audience for these motherboards.

        • ermo
        • 2 years ago

        I would guess that it’s better to buy a WiGig USB 3.x stick and plug that in whenever you need wireless connectivity? As an additional bonus, you’ll be able to use said USB stick across machines as necessary (since you’d only want to use it in non-latency sensitive situations anyway).

        But yeah, I’m probably not in the target audience as you suggest.

    • CuttinHobo
    • 2 years ago

    I’m trying to imagine spending $650 on a motherboard… It broke my imaginer.

      • jodiuh
      • 2 years ago

      Rofl!

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 2 years ago

      Even the tr zenith extreme is only $450.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      I can’t believe that boards are getting so expensive. Now that so much is on the CPU, all they actually do is house the physical slots, PCH and some power-delivery.

      They do far less work and are far less complex than $200 high-end boards of a decade ago. Do RGBLED controllers and stupid decorations like the side cutouts really justify $650?

      No, sorry. I’m just not [i<]that[/i<] gullible.

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