G.Skill Flare X Threadripper kits go up to 128 GB or 3600 MT/s

If you're reading this site, you're surely aware that AMD's Ryzen Threadripper many-core CPUs launched this morning. AMD's new chips have four memory channels, and that means to get the best performance you need to install memory four DIMMs at a time. Ryzen is famously picky about memory at high speeds, but never fear—G.Skill is here with new Flare X-series quad-channel kits specifically for Threadripper.

G.Skill's new kits run the gamut of speeds and capacities. Folks who fancy the finest DDR4 performance can fit four 8 GB modules running at 3600 MT/s for a total of 32 GB of memory. Alternatively, if you're doing serious work on your high-end desktop, slot in 128 GB of RAM at 2933 MT/s. The company also has DDR4 kits that support a low CAS latency of just 14 cycles at 3200 MT/s for the low-latency fanatics.

All of the new RAM is built using the now-somewhat-legendary Samsung B-die DRAMs that seem to work best with Ryzen. G.Skill says it also tests the RAM itself to ensure maximum compatibility. All of these kits require a relatively high input voltage of 1.35 V, although that's not unusual for speedy RAM. G.Skill didn't tell us when the new memory would be available or how much it would cost, but given that it's meant for the now-released Threadripper CPUs, we'd expect to see it soon.

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    • blahsaysblah
    • 2 years ago

    How would you get ECC RAM on these workstation class builds without paying through the nose for enterprise level pricing?

    Man have the RAM companies had it good colluding on prices these past couple of years.

    • jts888
    • 2 years ago

    Is anybody coming out with middle-ground 16GB @ ~3200 MHz DIMMs? 32GB total is frankly a bit low nowadays for a higher end workstation, but I’d prefer to not drop all the way to 2933 MHz for a 64 GB build if I were making one.

      • blahsaysblah
      • 2 years ago

      Is there a magic number involved with that 200Mhz that has big hit on system?

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        Benchmark from STH etc. show substantial differences in certain workloads on Epyc between 2666 and 2400 MHz, e.g., kernel compiling improving ~5% with a ~9% memory clock bump.

        Obviously in a perfect world we could have terabytes of RAM clocking insanely high, but as it is, I’d rather just have the highest possible clocks on the minimum capacity I’d consider acceptable.

          • blahsaysblah
          • 2 years ago

          I though maybe how for multiple reasons, you want 120Hz and not 144Hz for monitor, so maybe 3000Mhz is a dirty number for memory and 3200 is one of those magic numbers.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      If you hit the last link in the lede, G.Skill is also offering 4x8GB 3200 CL14 kits—I reckon if you relax the CAS latency by one (3200 CL15 is still quite respectable) you could slam eight of those in a Socket TR4 board to get 64GB at 3200.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        High clocking RAM unfortunately seldom seems to hit its targets in anything beyond 1DPC configurations, so I just assume things like this can’t keep up the pace at 2DPC until I hear otherwise.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Normally I’d be right there with you. However, I’ve seen that Threadripper can hit 3600MT/s in 1DPC configurations, so I’d be a little surprised if it couldn’t do 3200 in 2DPC.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 2 years ago

        What’s stopping people from using 16GB kits? There should be less issues running high capacity modules than double low capacity modules.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Sure. I was just speaking in the context of the RAM in this post. 🙂

          That said, 16GB DIMMs will surely be dual-rank, which is no better than running a pair of single-rank DIMMs. (I’m not saying all of these in this post are single-rank, just pointing out that using higher-capacity DIMMs isn’t really an end-around.)

            • DoomGuy64
            • 2 years ago

            It is with the penalties associated with higher capacity, because dual rank has less penalty than doubling up on single rank.

            For instance you can get 2x16GB @ 3200mhz with ryzen, while 4x8GB will not run @ 3200mhz. Only 2x8GB can run @ 3600. TR being quad channel can get away with 4x8GB @ 3600, but it will have more trouble hitting 3200 as 8×8 than 4×16.

            Dual-rank is the way to go for high capacity, but if you only need 32GB with TR, single rank will undoubtedly be faster. That’s what I’ve concluded anyway after reading AMD’s memory speed FAQs.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]All of the new RAM is built using the now-somewhat-legendary Samsung B-die DRAMs that seem to work best with Ryzen. [/quote<] Indeed, as a child I learned these legends from my grandfather every night at the fire in our village.

    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    so no love for x370/b350 supporting high speed memory? Its been a while since AGESA 1.0.0.6 was released back in the end May.

      • Vaughn
      • 2 years ago

      TR users will be purchasing more memory in general so makes sense to target them first.

      There are already dual channel kits of this available but only at 3200 MT/s for ryzen unless you meant 3600 MT/s memory specifically.

      • MOSFET
      • 2 years ago

      I believe there was one G.Skill FlareX for X370 that was 3200 and CAS 14. I believe Bruno mentioned it in a Friday Deals post. I believe it was 16 GB only (8×2), and apparently I will believe quite a bit of what I read on the internet.

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