National Chop Suey Day Shortbread

Why'd you leave the plate upon the table?

PC hardware and computing

  1. Koolance CPU-390CI CPU waterblock review @ PC Perspective
  2. Thermaltake View 71 TG EATX case review @ Tom's Hardware
  3. AORUS GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition 11G graphics card review @ ThinkComputers
  4. ASRock X370 Gaming K4 review @ TechPowerUp
  5. HyperX Predator 3200MHz DDR4 memory kit review @ Legit Reviews
  6. Grado GH2 Heritage Limited Edition headphones review @ KitGuru
  7. Review: HP EliteBook x360 G2 @    Hexus
  8. AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 versus AMD Radeon R9 Fury @ HardOCP
  9. Samsung Chromebook Pro review: one misstep spoils the show @ Engadget
  10. ASRock X399 Taichi review @ Guru3D
  11. Kingston DataTraveler Vault Privacy and EDGE diskGO Secure Pro Secure USB thumb drives review @ AnandTech

Games and VR

  1. PUBG players are paying insane prices for rare costumes @ PC Gamer
  2. PlayerUnknown's BattleGrounds tops Steam player count @ Blue's News
  3. Steam reviewers bomb Dota 2 over lack of Half-Life 3 @ Ars Technica

Science, hacks, makers and gadgets

  1. Remote controlled Nerf bomb @ HackADay
  2. Casting metal directly into 3D printed molds @ HackADay
  3. Thorium salt reactor experiments resume after 40 years @ New Atlas
  4. Quintuple-sized Lego go-kart @ HackADay (Shortbread link of the day)
  5. Bluetooth hula-hoop spins up space-saving fitness option @ New Atlas (they should call this a bula hooth *ducks*)

Tech news and culture

  1. Mystery of Civil War sub's sinking may be solved @ New Atlas
  2. The hyper-fragmented mess of streaming TV… and how it's only getting worse @ New Atlas (pretty sure we all saw this coming, hooray for choice?)

Cheese, memes, and RGB LEDs

  1. How cheese changed the shape of the human skull @ New Atlas
  2. Team Group T-Force Delta RGB 2x 8 GB DDR4 @ TechPowerUp
  3. Tt eSports Ventus X RGB mouse review @ KitGuru
  4. Downtown LA's next Instagram trend actually combines cheese and tea @ eater.com (LA finally gets in on the cheesiness TR has been following for months)
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Dell 27″ GSync monitor for $430: [url<]http://deals.dell.com/mpp/productdetail/hho?prg=1&VEN1=10550055-3224826-3-42339-nil-1-6-nil&AID=3224826&dgc=CJ&DGSeg=DHS&c=us&s=dhs&cid=198375&lid=45846&acd=12309198375458460&VEN3=812603983592566294[/url<]

    • just brew it!
    • 2 years ago

    Linked from an ad in the thorium reactor article: [url<]https://www.adafruit.com/product/2086?gclid=CMjrj4G7_dUCFQUuaQod2vgHWg[/url<] LOL... a discrete version of the 741 op-amp chip. I want it. I just don't want to pay $37.50 for one! For those who don't know the history, the venerable "741" op-amp was the chip that basically took op-amps mainstream, and revolutionized analog electronics in the process. Continuously in production from 1968 to the present (that's gotta be some sort of record). Currently listed for 58 cents in single unit quantity (23 cents if you're willing to buy in lots of 1000) at Digi-Key. Way back in the day, I taught myself how op-amps work with a handful of 741s, a solderless breadboard, a 'scope, and National Semiconductor's Op-Amp Applications Guides... brings back memories.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      $37.50 for a 741 OpAmp?

      I don’t even want to know what they are paying for their 555 timers!

        • just brew it!
        • 2 years ago

        IIRC that’s actually a simpler circuit, so the equivalent discrete implementation should be a bit less… 😉

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          You’re right! $3 discount for the 555: [url<]https://www.adafruit.com/product/1526[/url<] [Although by my rough count the 555 wins on a transistor count metric with 26 compared to 20 for the 741 OpAmp]

            • just brew it!
            • 2 years ago

            Heh. Not simpler after all, I guess.

            Edit: They’re even using 2N3904/2N3906 complementary transistor pairs in those kits. I remember using those back in the day. Makes sense, they date back to the same general era (the majority of modern transistors are MOSFETs, not BJTs). On the plus side, you didn’t need to worry much about ESD back then; BJTs are a lot more rugged.

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      Linear Monolithic FTW! I still have my old blue/white Linear databooks somewhere on my bookshelf 🙂 Good times! Good times!

        • just brew it!
        • 2 years ago

        Mine have long ago left the bookshelf. I think I still have some of them in the crawlspace. These days it’s much easier to just Google for datasheets if the urge strikes me to tinker with any of that sort of tech.

      • TheMonkeyKing
      • 2 years ago

      I gave you a +1 just because I was taught to be kind to the elderly.

        • just brew it!
        • 2 years ago

        Thanks. Now get off my lawn!

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      FWIW, reverse engineered teardown of the 555:
      [url<]http://www.righto.com/2016/04/[/url<] Also the 741: [url<]http://www.righto.com/2015/10/[/url<]

        • just brew it!
        • 2 years ago

        Crap, there goes the next hour! I need to get some sleep, but these links are calling…

          • willmore
          • 2 years ago

          Sleep first, his web site has a lot of stuff you’ll want to read! It’s not as deep of a rabbit hole as wikipedia, but it’s very appealing to a certain crowd. 😉

    • juzz86
    • 2 years ago

    YOU WANTED TO!

    Lyric fail. Heh.

    Also, as a long-time user of Koolance blocks (370, 380), do solidly recommend.

    • just brew it!
    • 2 years ago

    That doesn’t look like chop suey at all. Looks more like japchae (Korean sweet potato noodle dish).

      • drfish
      • 2 years ago

      I did my research, because I was suspicious as well. [url=https://thosefoods.com/chow-mein-vs-chop-suey/<]This story[/url<] used the same [url=https://pixabay.com/en/chop-suey-asian-food-vegetables-876506/<]stock image[/url<] I did though. Could be wrong I suppose...

        • just brew it!
        • 2 years ago

        Chop suey is normally served with rice (not noodles). And has a thickened sauce.

        The story also states that chop suey is “authentic Chinese”, when the origins of the dish are actually quite unclear. Most accounts I’ve seen claim it is more properly considered “Chinese-American”, i.e. invented by Chinese immigrants, circa mid- to late-1800s.

        Not that it matters. Here I am getting all pedantic about Chinese food on a tech site! (And I’m not even Chinese… ;-))

          • Voldenuit
          • 2 years ago

          [url<]http://www.avclub.com/the-a-v-club-s-crash-course-on-chinese-barbecue-1798511249[/url<]

    • mdkathon
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<] The hyper-fragmented mess of streaming TV... [/quote<] I'm not sure it's that big of a problem. Been off the cable for about two years with a mix of PS Vue, Hulu/Netflix/Amazon + MLB.tv/MLS Live and a VPN/proxy service. I'm paying about $100.00/month all told for everything I want. Though some costs (Amazon, Netflix, Hulu, VPN, Proxy, MLS Live) I had been paying for when I also paid $175.00 for cable. PS Vue is $45, and MLB.tv is $120 a year (or FREE if you subscribe to T-Mobile, which I do...). Yeah, it's still complicated to get *everything* you want just like Cable. Still saves me over $100.00 a month and I can turn on-off service at will when there is nothing I am looking forward to watching, like HBO for example which I just cancelled. I realize you can add/remove 'add-on' packages with Cable but most of the savings one find are for locked in contracts. Also, both Roku and Amazon Fire TV are actually useful and easy. I've been moving away from HTPCs because they take care of almost everything I would want, and really if I wasn't so lazy and setup a decent NAS they'd do everything I would need. I think one of the larger problems facing the streaming services winning in the living room are data caps. I had a very hard problem staying below 300GB/month with streaming on 3 TVs in a household. Not until we were able to pick up a competing internet service (Gigabit via microwave - Wave G internet service in Seattle... $80/month no cap) did it really work. There were months where I'd be paying $50.00 for 'overage' on internet. It STILL saved me money vs. a 'full preimum' cable I used to pay for. Also, fragmentation in the case is actually [b<]competition[/b<]. This isn't Android or Linux... It's services that we pay for which need to compete for our business. I'm glad Disney is moving into the space. I'm happy to be able to look at Sling, Hulu TV, and YouTube Red every couple of months to see if they're a better deal for me. I'm very happy to be able to have a simple Cloud DVR that I'm not paying a obscene amount for vs. what our local Cable Co. charges for a DVR that pretty much sucks. I ran Windows Media Center from 2005-2016 and I do have a warm place in my heart for it, but I don't have a warm place for pairing a CableCard with a network based tuner for example, or when all of a sudden WMC just loses TV tuner configurations.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Thorium salt reactor experiments resume after 40 years @ New Atlas[/quote<] The problem with Thorium reactor fanboys is that they are always salty.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      Nobody disses the Mighty Thor…oops! Wrong meme. Please return to your regularly scheduled comments.

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