Gigabyte makes what could be the smallest GTX 1080 yet

Nvidia's board partners have been jockeying to see who can make the smallest GeForce GTX 1080 for some time now, and Gigabyte is apparently upping the stakes with its GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G. This card offers a GTX 1080-reference 1607 MHz base clock and a 1733 MHz boost range, but it does so using a board that's just 6.7" (169 mm) long. Compare that to the 10.5" (267 mm) length of the GTX 1080 Founders Edition, and you have a card that's theoretically much friendlier to Mini-ITX and other small-form-factor builds than average.

Gigabyte's cooler for this card uses three copper heat pipes in a direct-contact arrangement with the GP104 GPU, running through an aluminum fin stack cooled by a single 90-mm fan. The card uses a five-plus-two-phase power-delivery circuit, compared to the five-plus-one-phase design on the Founders Edition reference card. Part of the juice for that subsystem will come courtesy of a single eight-pin power connector.

Though we don't expect many will try to push this card to its limits, Gigabyte's OC Mode clock speed profile offers a 25-MHz base-clock-speed increase to 1632 MHz and a 38-MHz boost-clock-speed-range increase to 1771 MHz. The company's Aorus Graphics Engine software offers easy access to clock, power, and thermal tweaking controls on this card if you're so inclined.

No word on pricing or availability for this card yet, but we expect it to hit store shelves soon. Thanks to TR tipster SH SOTN for the heads-up.

Comments closed
    • MpG
    • 2 years ago

    Considering that Nvidia pretty much achieved parity between it’s desktop and mobile cards, and the 1080 can already be crammed into an MXM form factor, is this card actually that special?

    • ChicagoDave
    • 2 years ago

    I find it odd that so many people can’t imagine a use case for this. Just because you technically can fit a full length, double slot GPU into your build doesn’t mean that’s what you want.

    In my most recent build using a Fractal Design Node 605, I could use a full length card if I wanted to. The problem is that a full length card would literally fill every millimeter of my case’s depth dimension, acting as a wall that would block airflow. In a small HTPC case like the 605, I need all the free, unrestricted airflow I can get. My original intention was actually to get the 1070 version of this, but supplies were extremely limited at launch and for several weeks after. I ended up getting the EVGA 1060 SC that is only 6.8″ long (and completely silent).

    To be honest, I’m kind of done with the full length cards. I’ve never bought a GPU higher than a xx70 series and we’re already at the point where a xx 60 or xx70 can be effectively and silently cooled with one or two fans. I have no use for a giant card filling up my case when one half the size can do the same thing. The smaller size allows better airflow throughout the case, easier cable routing, allows easier access to the mobo and surrounding stuff.

    With all of that said, a 1080 is a different beast than a 1060 or even 1070. I find it curious that Gigabyte has been selling the 1070 in the exact same design for a year now, but just came out with the 1080 version. Unless they’ve been stockpiling the golden 1080 GPUs they come across, I’m guessing the cooling will have some difficulty or the fan will be running at full tilt whenever it’s being used.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      And here’s the utterly stupid thing:

      This card is TOO TALL to fit into a Node 605.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        It would fit in my Corsair 380T, but that thing is basically an mATX case with two slots missing.

    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    this just adds insult to injury

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Do these compact designs sacrifice longevity and durability in favor of being svelte?

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Sort of.

      They sacrifice the longevity and durability of your patience to be in the same room as these noisy and underperforming PR stunts.

      If you don’t care about high-RPM fans and throttling/downclocked hardware, then this is the card for you!

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        If your case allows longer cards I see no advantage in choosing these shorter variants. Given how most cases make sure longer cards fit, I don’t know why most card manufactures go out of their way to do this, given the small market for it. The market for high end cards is already relatively small as it is, and these smaller high end cards make up a fraction of that already small market. This is probably done mainly for the halo effect it gives a brand. I dunno.

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah, halo effect for bragging rights would be the only reason I can see that makes sense.

          More expensive, undercooled, lower-clocked, and with added compatibiliy issues because of the height? Nobody sane is going to buy that unless they are stupid enough to buy a case that’s only 7″ long.

          On second thought – is there even a case on the market that would need this card specifically? – There are sub 8.7″ cards that [b<]*DON'T*[/b<] violate the spec in height like [url=https://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/b4140/zotac-gtx-1080-mini<]this one[/url<] and there are several versions with a plastic blower cooler that would work better in a cramped case and are only 10" long.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Take that, Furry Nano.

      • noko
      • 2 years ago

      Supposedly Vega Nano will be coming out, with how little the performance goes up with the power on Vega it maybe a good performer as well at 150w. I am sure low voltage selected GPUs would be used to keep the power reasonable.

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    That size factor is pretty attractive. Will tiny gaming boxes now appear?

      • Wall Street
      • 2 years ago

      The problem with these tiny cards is that most of the mini-ITX cases go out of their way to make sure they support 11″ GPUs.

        • Voldenuit
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, at least the ones with decent airflow and support for dual-width cards.

        The cases which are small enough to need extra-short cards usually don’t have the airflow to cool 180W cards in the chassis.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        And despite supporting 11″ GPUs, some of those mini-ITX cases don’t have a lot of extra height above the card. Oftentimes it’s barely enough space to plug the PCIe power cables in even when the top of the card is flush with the expansion slot covers like the GTX FE cards.

        When manufacturers make a card taller just so that they can claim it’s shorter, they’re needlessly shrinking a dimension nobody cares about and erroneously making the card more likely to be incompatible with any number of slim HTPC desktop cases and several of the more compact/popular shoebox cases. If an over-height card does miraculously manage to fit, you may still have to sacrifice a couple or perhaps even the [i<]only[/i<] drive bay available in the tiny case just to plug in the power connectors, resulting in an SSD duct-taped messily against a side panel instead of securely screwed into a bay.... /facepalm.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 2 years ago

          Oh, I fucking hate this.

          I got a Bitfenix Prodigy and I fucking love it [i<]except[/i<] for how it can't support those damn "tall" graphics cards and a 5.25" optical drive at the same time. But a 12" card would fit perfectly fine. I'm honestly considering a Vega 10-based card if only because all of the GP104 cards with nice coolers also use custom boards that are retardedly tall. I figure there will be more Vega 10 cards that use the reference board since there's less incentive to invest in the middling Vega 10.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            I was more of an AOL guy than a Prodigy guy.

            • bhtooefr
            • 2 years ago

            You could just get a Founders Edition card – Vega cards with aftermarket coolers will also likely use tall coolers even if they’re on the reference PCB.

            Also, that’s hilarious that the [i<]Bitfenix Prodigy[/i<] of all cases can't take a tall gamer card. We're talking about the same case that calls itself a Mini-ITX case, yet someone actually modded one to take a full ATX board, after all...

            • ImSpartacus
            • 2 years ago

            Yeah, a founder’s edition would work. While Nvidia’s blower is very nice, I’d rather not get a reference blower cooler.

            And yes, an unmodded Prodigy is totally unprepared for a tall graphics cards if you also want an optical drive. They could’ve moved the optical drive half an inch to the right side of the case (it’s centered with about an inch on either side) and everything would be wonderful. But no one expected this bullshit trend in graphics cards back in 2013.

            • DPete27
            • 2 years ago

            If you want an Nvidia card, look at EVGA. They generally make “shorter” cards because their heatpipes run the length of the card instead of the height.

            • BurntMyBacon
            • 2 years ago

            [quote<]I'm honestly considering a Vega 10-based card if only because all of the GP104 cards with nice coolers also use custom boards that are retardedly tall.[/quote<] Just to make you aware, EVGA has some stock clocked 1080s, 1080SC, and 1080SC2 with non-reference coolers that are the same height and length as their 1080 reference card and should fit. The [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487318&cm_re=08G-P4-6583-KR-_-14-487-318-_-Product<]SC2[/url<] comes with a pretty reasonable factory OC for not using a custom PCB and the iCX cooler/sensors isn't bad either. Reference Vega 10 may be a little loud in a small enclosure, but otherwise should be fine as well.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 2 years ago

            I appreciate the heads up.

            I knew that EVGA used the reference PCB in a couple cards, but I heard there were coil whine issues, so I’ve been leery.

            I didn’t know there was an 11 Gbps version with the fancy ICX sensors. It’s a little rich for my blood at the moment, but I’ll have to keep an eye on it.

        • enio
        • 2 years ago

        check Lian Li baby tower cases – the updated PC-Q7 or PC-Q29..

      • psuedonymous
      • 2 years ago

      Kind of the other way around: cases like the NFC S4 Mini have been around for quite a while, and it’s only been recently that you could start putting ‘bigger’ GPUs like the 1080 into them, rather than lower power GPUs.

      • shank15217
      • 2 years ago

      Without a blower type fan, you need a specialized case to get decent airflow, this looks a lot better than it is.

      • NovusBogus
      • 2 years ago

      MIni ITX gives the typical user everything they need, though I’d be happy if they struck a balance with the old style ~8 inch cards that work well in a mATX case. Seems all you can get these days are the tiny ITX edition or the totally-not-compensating overly long cooling module.

        • ChicagoDave
        • 2 years ago

        No offense, but you haven’t been paying attention if you think the only options are tiny ITX cards or giant overly long cooling GPUs. There’s plenty of players in between the two extremes such as:

        – EVGA 1060s – several different cards all 6.8″ long and 4.37″ high
        – Zotac 1060 Mini – 6.85″ long and 4.38″ high or the Zotac AMP! 1060 – 8.27″ long and 4.38″ high
        – Zotac 1070 Mini – 8.2″ long and 4.8″ high
        -Gigabyte 1070 Mini ITX- 6.7″ long and 5.2″ high
        – MSI 1070 Mini – 6.8″ long and 5.07″ high

        There’s also the Galax 1070 Katana that’s a single slot wide card, 10.5″ long and 4.8″ high

        AMD has the Fury Nano at 5.98″ long and 5.63″ tall
        There an RX 570 thats 8.86″ long and 5.39″ tall

        And on and on….needless to say there’s plenty of variety. And that’s great because not everyone needs a 12″ card with 3 fans to cool down the GPU, nor do they want a card that acts like an interior wall blocking airflow.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve been running full-sized cards in a 14 liter [url=http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=533&area=en<]Fortress FTZ01S[/url<]. My next build will go back to micro-ATX, like the 23 liter [url=http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=392&area=en<]Sugo SG10[/url<] or the 30.2 liter [url=http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=303&area=en<]Temjin TJ08-E[/url<] that I used for my previous build. My point is that you don't need to limit yourself to only dinky graphics cards to build a compact gaming PC.

    • NimbusTLD
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder how loud this gets.

      • NovusBogus
      • 2 years ago

      If it’s anything like other recent-ish single fan cards, not nearly as loud as the outspoken critics want you to believe. Maybe a couple of decibels more than a 2-3 fan solution at worst. A stock clock 1080 isn’t very power hungry for its weight class. Some of the negativity comes from the frequent use of blowers on reference designs, but blowers are always louder than fans due to how they move air.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        The problem isn’t really the number of fans, it’s the fact that on these tiny cards that don’t exhaust externally, there’s so much recirculation of air.

        The fact they’re designed for cramped enclosures just amplifies that problem so it might be only a coulple of decibels louder than a dual fan on an open test bench but in the real world in an mITX case it’s the difference between “I didn’t notice the noise” and “Hey, that card’s distractingly noisy”.

        If you look at the backplate of this card, it’s massively restrictive so that diagram above, showing all the blue airflow coming out of the left side of this cooler is going to be hindered by those insultingly tiny slots next to the DVI port, vastly reducing the cooling effectiveness of the left half of that heatsink. The natural vortex created by hot air leaving the right side of the shroud will immediately be sucked back through the heatsink since it’s under an inch away from the intake fan, reducing the cooling effectiveness of the right half of the heatsink.

        So yes, you can get single fan solutions that work well, and work quietly. This is not one of those, especially not in a tiny, cramped mITX case with low airflow. My experience of this is with Gigabyte, EVGA and Zotac single-fan cards – admittedly not this generation but R9 285, GTX 680 and 980 cards in Sugo SG05 shoebox mITX cases with similar TDP to the 1080.

        Where the reference blowers were whisper quiet in Sugo SG05s, the single fan mITX cards like this were all bad. Horrendously bad, in the context of a PC for use on a 50″ HDTV mobile meeting table trolley. I ended up putting a 750Ti into that box and just apologising that it would suck for CAD work. Nobody wants to discuss engineering details around a table with a 50+dBa dust buster running four feet away.

    • BIF
    • 2 years ago

    This looks a little thicker than 2-slots. If so, that’s a non-starter for some systems. You can’t always count on being able to hang a GPU off the edge of a motherboard.

      • bhtooefr
      • 2 years ago

      Looks like it’s within the 2 slot limits: [url<]https://static.gigabyte.com/Product/3/6406/2017082816545657_big.png[/url<] The height is another concern with some Mini-ITX builds, but then that's typical for faster Mini-ITX-optimized GPUs. (And, the only case I can think of at the moment that would have trouble with it, can take longer GPUs, so...)

        • BIF
        • 2 years ago

        It does look as though the shroud sticks out a bit there, but maybe not enough to impinge on the next bay’s card.

          • bhtooefr
          • 2 years ago

          To be fair, this is a Mini-ITX GPU – there won’t be a next card. (I mean, there [i<]could[/i<] be, but really, there won't be - if you're building in anything bigger, you'd just use different cards.)

            • BIF
            • 2 years ago

            Okay, gotcha; thanks.

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