AMD Bristol Ridge APUs are now available in stores

AMD's Bristol Ridge AM4 APUs have been out in the wild for almost a year now. The chips were sold to AMD's manufacturing partners months before Ryzen silicon hit the market. System builders looking to put together a system around an AM4 motherboard without buying a discrete graphics card have been out of luck until today. Six different APUs have now popped up on Newegg, ranging from the two-core 3.0 GHz A6-9500E to the four-core 3.8 GHz A12-9800. There's also a single Athlon model based on the same die but with the graphics component disabled: the X4 950.

Keep in mind these Bristol Ridge chips are still based around the same Excavator CPU cores and GCN graphics architecture as the previous-generation APUs. Shoppers looking for APUs with Zen CPU cores and Vega's NCU graphics architecture will have to wait until the release of Raven Ridge late this year or early 2018.

The big news for the latest round of APUs is support for dual-channel DDR4 memory. Given that past AMD APUs have responded quite favorably to increases in memory bandwidth when gaming, we expect that the new silicon should outperform the older generation, particularly when paired with the fastest compatible DDR4 memory modules. We've prepared this handy table for you.

Model CPU integer

cores

CPU base/turbo

clock (GHz)

RAM

speed

(MT/s)

GPU

branding

GPU base/turbo

clock (MHz)

TDP (W) Price

A6-9500E 2 3.0 / 3.4 2400 R5 576 / 800 35 $55
A8-9600 4 3.1 / 3.4 R7 655 / 900 65 $70
A10-9700E 3.0 / 3.5 600 / 847 35 $85
A10-9700 3.5 / 3.8 720 / 1029 65 $90
A12-9800E 3.1 / 3.8 655 / 900 35 $105
A12-9800 3.8 / 4.2 800 / 1108 65 $110
Athlon X4 950 3.5 / 3.8 $60

The $60 Athlon X4 950 model shares the CPU clock speeds of the $90 A10-9700. Doing some rough comparisons, the closest competition to the entry-level A6-9500E from Intel is the 3.0 GHz two-core Kaby Lake Celeron G3950. Intel's dual-core chips don't support the company's Turbo Boost feature, so the base clock speed is the highest rate the chip will ever hit. The Bristol Ridge range-topping A12-9800 is actually a bit more expensive than Intel's $100 two-core, four-thread 3.7 GHz Pentium G4620. While Intel's offerings likely offer substantially better CPU performance, we figure Bristol Ridge's integrated graphics probably come out ahead of Intel's offerings in games.

These Bristol Ridge chips offer a way for buyers without the scratch for both a new CPU and graphics card to get onto the AM4 platform. A builder could purchase a $70 A8-9600 and a modestly-priced B350 motherboard and use them until they save up funds for a shiny video card and an Editor's Choice Award-winning Ryzen 5 1600 CPU. The inflated prices in the mid-range graphics card market right now might support this inchwise approach. Builders who aren't as constrained might want to wait to see what Raven Ridge has to offer.

Comments closed
    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    Not mentioned in the Newegg listings or the article is how the graphics are configured. It might be the same as the 6th gen, but I have no idea. They call all of these configures “Radeon R7 graphics” which seems like a stretch. Each “GPU core” as far as I can tell has 64 SPs.

    Anyway, here’s how AMD lists graphics in the A8, A10, and A12:

    A8: 6 “GPU cores” 384 SPs
    A10: 6 “GPU cores” 384 SPs
    A12: 8 “GPU cores” 512 SPs

    I have no idea what the ROP count is, and it likely doesn’t matter with relatively limited memory bandwidth (although the A12 supports [url=http://www.amd.com/en/products/apu/7th-gen-a12-9800-apu<]DDR4-2400[/url<], which is sure to help). No idea what memory overclocking will be like.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      Bristol Ridge APUs (except the A6-9600E) have the same GCN 3.0 integrated graphics with 512 stream processors (SPs) as Kaveri Refresh A10 APUs had. Raven Ridge APUs are expected to bring much more significant changes.
      [url<]https://techreport.com/review/30619/amd-unwraps-its-seventh-generation-desktop-apus-and-am4-platform[/url<] [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/10705/amd-7th-gen-bristol-ridge-and-am4-analysis-a12-9800-b350-a320-chipset[/url<] [url<]http://wccftech.com/amd-bristol-ridge-a12-9800-am4-platform-performance/[/url<]

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        Right, I was just adding the above for completeness’ sake.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder how many of these AMD will actually sell. Personally if I suddenly needed to get a new CPU+mobo+RAM combo I’d be ok with one of these if DDR4 prices were more compelling. Should be great for the very undemanding things I do with my PC, then should the need arise next time I can upgrade to Ryzen.

    • msroadkill612
    • 2 years ago

    Just a thought, but maybe it appeals to miners? They dont give a rats about cpu power, and it may suit them to have the igp to run the rig.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      If x8 PCI 3.0 is enough to run all those tentacles from the spaghetti monster that talks to the graphics cards, then yes, you might be right.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    DO NOT WANT!

    • Zizy
    • 2 years ago

    I don’t know who would be interested in these chips.

    If you don’t game, G4560 is the default pick for an office PC.
    If you do game, you generally want a dGPU, even low-end one. Only as cheap gaming as possible, or gaming on a single chip (without space wasted by dGPU) is viable market here. Cheap OW/LOL/DOTA box.

    It looks nice as a placeholder until you can get R5 1600+dGPU (or perhaps even R5 2600+dGPU), but the problem goes back to “who would want my old CPU?” similar to the KL-X. Buying less upgradeable G4560 and selling it together with board might be easier (and with less loss) than finding buyers for this.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      I cannot recommend the $79 Pentium G4560 for use without a discrete graphics card when the Pentium G4600 offers a 0.1 GHz faster CPU and [b<]double[/b<] the integrated graphics capability for just [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117739<]$8 more[/url<]. [url<]https://ark.intel.com/compare/97143,97453,97460,97455,97527,97147,97129[/url<] AMD's Bristol Ridge socket-AM4 APUs are place-holders until Raven Ridge APUs arrive in a few months.

    • NTMBK
    • 2 years ago

    Another 28nm APU? Oh be still, my beating heart.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Intel: Look [b<]YET ANOTHER[/b<] 14nm product with CoffeeLake! Take that! AMD: Hold. My. Beer.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    These are literally ‘who cares!’ CPUs. Yeah, as in ‘Who cares what it is so long as it boots Windows and runs Office and Firefox.

      • NTMBK
      • 2 years ago

      It’s still significantly faster than the Atom and Jaguar based crap that plenty of people use in their desktop PCs.

        • msroadkill612
        • 2 years ago

        Exactly, &3-4 years ago or more, amdS 28nm apuS were a fine purchase for many, but the dopey punters believed intels BS. They couldnt give them away.

        They had a slightly inferior cpu that nobody at level cares about, and a very superior gpu which does matter, yet intel shifted the goalposts to focus argument on the cpu, much as they have with gaming re ryzen.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 2 years ago

          Hmm, if I recall, the TR review summaries of the AMD APUs has always pointed to the narrow range in which they are a good deal. That is, cheaper than a box with a decent dedicated GPU, but still aimed at some level of gaming. I think that argument stands… and may remain valid to some extent even once Zen enters the picture.

          A dedicated GPU is always just a step away, and so compromising on the CPU to get the integrated GPU is always a tough call.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 2 years ago

    Prices seem really off. I mean A12-9800 at $110????! You can get a Kaby-lake G3930 with an IGP for under $50 and a Core i3-7100 with IGP for around $120.

    Raven-Ridge couldn’t come sooner.

      • ptsant
      • 2 years ago

      Unlike the intel IGPs, the 9800 iGPU is surprisingly capable. In fact, the difference in IGP/iGPUs in favor of the A12 is much bigger than the difference in pure CPU, which is obviously in favor of the intel chips. There are videos of people playing BF1 and Doom on the APUs.

      Anyway, most people are clearly better off buying cheap intel cpus + a dGPU, but then you are certainly closer to $200 for CPU+dGPU, rather than $110.

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 2 years ago

    I want to see TR review one of these.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      “It’s slow and the faster parts still use too much power compared to the Core i3. If you need a sub-$300 DOTA box, it might work out for you.” -theoretical review

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, but I want the graphs.

        Also I want to see TR-1900X vs R-1800X, even though nobody reasonable is likely to cross-shop those two products.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I disagree on the second part – I think folks who want the extra PCIe lanes for lots of fast storage or dual-GPU setups will cross-shop low-end Threadripper with top-end Ryzen.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 2 years ago

            I don’t deny that people who “want” the IO will cross-shop 1900X and 1800X, but they’re not being rational, in my view. Emphasis on the [i<]want[/i<]. Also, I think dual-GPU falls under irrational. People who use IO and ECC to pay the bills will [i<]know[/i<].

            • msroadkill612
            • 2 years ago

            Those who want fast storage (virtual memory~, as in lane gobbling raid) will include everybody as things inevitably pan out. Out hunger for it is insatiable and unaffordable in dram form.

    • POLAR
    • 2 years ago

    A bloody year later? Too much love for Intel-loving OEMs, too much disrespect for people building their system.

    • mcnels1
    • 2 years ago

    According to products.amd.com, the A10-9700E and A10-9800E are both 35 watt parts.

    • Takeshi7
    • 2 years ago

    I just want to see the Athlon X4 950 benchmarked vs the Ryzen 3 1200. See how much DDR4 helps.

      • Vhalidictes
      • 2 years ago

      At this point I’d like to see some Raven Ridge leaks.

      AMD video cards tend to be heavy on CPU use, so a Zen-based APU might be a lot better than recent Bulldozer APU performance would indicate.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 2 years ago

    [quote=”Stately Wayne Manion”<] We've prepared this handy table for you. [/quote<] Yay for tables to make data easier to digest. [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbkbU32X5dI[/url<]

    • dpaus
    • 2 years ago

    Time to clear out old stock = Raven Ridge might not be that far away.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      Gonna take them a few months to unload these things. I bet Raven Ridge is still not coming until 2018.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, Vega needs a bit more time in the oven. There’s no way AMD was satisfied

        Also, Ryzen 3 needs to sell. Raven Ridge will probably make Ryzen 3 a tougher sell.

        We’d see more Raven Ridge leaks by now if it was <3 mo away.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I would think that the sooner AMD can quit selling mostly-disabled CPUs, the better for them. Get the Ryzen die’s average selling price up and sell single-CCX CPUs with Vega graphics at the lower price. Ryzen 3 is (IMO) just a stopgap solution.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      October at the earliest, December if they are going to meet their “late 2017” launch target.

    • Kraaketaer
    • 2 years ago

    This post is wrong on a few points. The 65/95W chips have been out for a month or so. What’s new today is the launch of the 35W E SKUs.

    Also I have to join the chorus clamoring for Raven Ridge. My HTPC/storage server is relatively new, with an A8-7600, but I would love to move it to pure NAS duties and replace the HTPC part of it with a new RR-based build in a far smaller case. If there’s a 95W 4c8t RR with 768 SPs, that would be almost perfect.

    • YukaKun
    • 2 years ago

    I’m still fine with my A8-3500 at the heart of the house HTPC, but consider me hyped for Raven Ridge. Even if the Vega side kind of sucks, I’m pretty sure the bump by Razen and DDR4 will be very well worth it in terms of overall performance gains.

    Cheers!

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      A10-7850 here for office tasks. But, ditto for Raven Ridge. The 7850 is starting to feel a little slow.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      A8-5600K HTPC here. I probably don’t NEED a Raven Ridge upgrade, but I sure do WANT one.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      I built a system with A8-3850 on an Asus F1A75-M Pro for HTPC duty several years ago, but it has been re-purposed for web browsing, e-mail and casual gaming (very recently upgraded to a Radeon HD7870 2GB, which is serious overkill for [url=http://store.steampowered.com/app/388450/Spooky_Bonus/<]]Spooky Bonus[/url<] and [url=http://www.molecontrolgame.com/<]Mole Control[/url<]).

        • YukaKun
        • 2 years ago

        Funny you mentiont that. I got a… I kid you not… Trash candidate R7 250X. They were going to throw it away at my GF’s office and she said if she could have it instead, haha.

        The problem with attaching a video card (or anything that up’s the overall wattage consumption) is the line noise I get. I don’t use digital to an external audio system and use an analog 4.0 Monitor Speaker system, so tiny noise signal becomes an annoying “buzz” fest.

        I am really thinking about getting a cheap 5.1 Onkyo for simple DAC duty and see if it solves it.

        Any ideas? XD

        Cheers!

          • msroadkill612
          • 2 years ago

          Whatever, but that R7 has the distinction of being about the only model that pairs w/ amdS natty a10 etc. apuS. In theory the igp & discrete gpu card together make a more powerful, multi screen rig.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 2 years ago

        You should introduce that person to [url=http://store.steampowered.com/app/356670/Spookys_Jump_Scare_Mansion/<]Spooky's [s<]House of Jump Scares[/s<]Jump Scare Mansion.[/url<]

      • Topinio
      • 2 years ago

      i5-2500K HTPC here, thing is trying to live forever.

      These Bristol Ridge things aren’t even that good [url<]https://uk.hardware.info/reviews/7207/amd-a12-9800-bristol-ridge-apu-socket-am4-review[/url<]

      • ozzuneoj
      • 2 years ago

      Funny, talking about old AMD systems still plugging along. I built a super low budget system for a friend back in 2010 and he was just telling me how its still doing what it needs to do (very basic office tasks). I just looked up the specs thinking it was an Athlon II X2 or something… turns out it was a Sempron 140 (a 2.7Ghz SINGLE CORE AM3 CPU), 2x1GB DDR2-800, Gigabyte 785G board, and an Antec EA-380D running Windows 7.

      Its amazing how all of the bleeding edge hardware we see in this hobby makes things like this seem crazy. A single core with 2GB of RAM being used regularly in 2017?!?! Well, yeah, its probably going to be fine for the same task for 7 more years, as long as nothing outright fails. I offered to upgrade it if he wants. I could add 2GB more RAM and a Phenom II X4 B95 for under $30 (plus a cheap heatsink to handle the 95W CPU). To avoid having the Radeon 4250 fry the board some day I could throw in a GT 520 (which is actually an upgrade) that I have laying around. And now its way faster than a brand new $350 AIO Celeron N series junker from a retail store and more than four times as powerful as what he’s already happy with. Why do I even want to upgrade it!?!?! What’s wrong with me… >_<

      • ptsant
      • 2 years ago

      The Vega cores do not necessarily suck, it’s probably the HBM that makes things complicated.

      And Raven Ridge will have 700 cores, versus 512 on the current top-end APUs. And much faster frequency. And 14nm process.

      The market for $100 dGPUs will practically disappear. Let’s just hope that the mid-tier GPUs (RX 570 and the like) settle to reasonable prices until then.

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