Rumor: European site leaks eighth-gen Core CPU prices and launch date

If the rumors about widespread increases in core counts in Intel's eighth-generation Core processors turn out to be correct, the launch of the new chips figures to be one of the company's most exciting launches in several years. Now, Finnish technology website iO-Tech claims to have gotten its hands on a price list for the three models most eagerly anticipated among enthusiasts: the four-core, four-thread Core i3-8350K, the six-core, six-thread Core i5-8600K, and the range-topping six-core, 12-thread Core i7-8700K. Furthermore, the site says that the new chips will be available worldwide on October 5.

The larger news here is the rumored release date in October, about nine months after the launch of Kaby Lake and the accompanying 200-series chipsets on the desktop in January of this year. The short interval between launches suggests that Intel might be feeling pressure from AMD's Ryzen-led resurgence. iO-Tech also echoes earlier rumors that the eighth-generation Core chips will require new motherboards with 300-series chipsets.

Model Seventh-gen

launch price

Rumored eighth-gen

launch price

Rumored

launch price

change

EUR USD (exc. VAT)
i3-x350K $168 €199 $199 +19%
i5-x600K $239 €299 $299 +25%
i7-x700K $349 €419 $420 +20%

The launch prices of numerically-comparable chips appear to have increased by 19% to 25% depending on model, though Intel's per-region pricing isn't always a simple currency conversion. We reported about a similar price leak at a Canadian e-tailer just a couple of weeks ago. The leaked Canadian pricing also suggested price increases, though their magnitude was smaller.

Comments closed
    • Tristan
    • 2 years ago

    8400 for sub 200 Euro is the same as 1600, with the same perf and free graphics

      • Matt321
      • 2 years ago

      Erm… No. Intel IPC performance is already faster by default, the only bonus AMD had was multicore performance, which this series is supposed to rectify (good, we don’t want an underwhelming choice). Seriously, what drives people like you…

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Nah. Sorry, Intel. No matter what you do I’m getting Ryzen. I got FX when it was further behind your stuff, and now with Ryzen so strong and so compelling, I have far less reason to not get AMD.

    • Star Brood
    • 2 years ago

    So the prices didn’t change, just that they have raised the bar on what qualifies as Core branding now. i3 is now i5 and i5/i7 are just the higher-socketed parts they’ve always been selling.

    The claim they made to 30-50% performance increase is just the effect of rebranding – not price cutting.

      • Firestarter
      • 2 years ago

      AMD raised the bar, Intel can’t get away with calling 4 cores a premium product anymore

        • ChicagoDave
        • 2 years ago

        Think you mean 4 threads? 4 Core CPU’s with and without hyperthreading/SMT are still considered premium products

        It’s kind of funny though…just a few years ago no one gave a crap about AMD’s 8 core ‘Dozers, and instead were all interested in Intel’s super high clocking dual core Gxxxx processors. Fast dual cores were good enough on a tight budget, and quad core’s being enough for 99% of tasks. Hyperthreading can be rather hit or miss, bringing power/heat way up for a moderate increase in performance. Most people don’t need 8 threads though, they just need a few fast ones, so many people recommended i5’s over i7’s unless going balls to the wall. Outside of specialized programs (for which there’s multi-thousand dollar budgets), the vast majority of user will never use all 8 threads on a current i7 or Ryzen for more than a few seconds unrar’ing files, transcoding audio, etc.

        And that brings us to today, where apparently 4 cores isn’t premium, Intel is milking everyone by charging $350 for the fastest 4core/8thread or $250 for 4core/4thead CPU on the planet (soon to be 6core/12thread) and AMD is the savior because they finally have a competent CPU. Yea they’re slower, have very little OC headroom before thermals start to bite, have worse (if that’s possible) PCIe connectivity (# of lanes total and by version), fewer USB ports, etc etc. But competition is good so forget all of that. When the numbers suit AMD people say look at it objectively (Cinebench mutli-core score), when they don’t then it’s “good enough”.

        Don’t get me wrong, Intel definitely pulls some shady anti-consumer shit over the years. I don’t really have a horse in this race – I buy Intel not because I love them, but because they put out a superior product in my price range. I just find the constant stream of Intel bashing/AMD praising to be getting a little stale. Whether you meant 4 thread or 4 core doesn’t matter – a 4-core non-SMT/hyperthreading CPU is still a premium product The i5-7600k I’m typing this on can handle anything I throw at it without topping 130*F.

        If AMD would sell a 64 lane Ryzen/Threadripper for a “non-milking” price I’d bite; unfortunately $600 CPU’s are just as unaffordable now as they were a year or two ago.

          • Firestarter
          • 2 years ago

          No, I mean 4 cores. 2 cores (with or without HT) stopped being premium 8 years ago ([url<]https://techreport.com/review/17545/intel-core-i5-750-and-core-i7-870-processors[/url<]) or at the very latest 6.5 years ago with Sandy Bridge. AMD's Bulldozer doesn't factor into that because of its poor performance. Now, with single thread performance having reached a ceiling and CPU cores still shrinking, the only reason Intel was able to sell quad core CPUs as premium products is because they had no real competition in the high end. Now that AMD has a competitive product again, Intel cannot afford to have AMD position their octa core processors against their own quad cores because that makes AMDs Ryzen looks very attractive. Quad core CPUs are definitely still good enough with today's games, just like dual core CPUs were good enough back when that Core i5-750 was introduced. How long that is going to last is anyone's guess, but barring any big jumps in single threaded performance I think it's time for enthusiasts who demand premium performance to start looking for CPUs with more than 4 cores.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 2 years ago

          Nobody cared about 8 core dozers because each of those 8 cores was undesirable. I don’t see what there is to be confused about.

            • MOSFET
            • 2 years ago

            Just for fun I overclocked an 8320 to 4.4GHz last night. It still wasn’t much fun.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 2 years ago

          4C/4T i5 has been 100% on some modern games

          4C/8T (or 6C/6T) is minimum for mid-high end gaming outside of the generally lightweight reports titles.

      • ChicagoDave
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]The claim they made to 30-50% performance increase is just the effect of rebranding - not price cutting.[/quote<] How is it not price cutting? What used to be the cheapest Intel's "Enthusiast" series CPUs at $400-$600 are now in the normal consumer series at $350. That's a price drop to me.

        • Star Brood
        • 2 years ago

        The upcoming i5 has disabled hyperthreading to distinguish it from the previous 6 core $400 CPU’s, but at a higher cost than previous i5s to be sure.

        The i3 gotten a lot more expensive to bump it into i5 pricing (it has been creeping that direction for the past generations).

        What is being seen is price creeping coupled with marketing rebranding, to make it seem like they’re giving you something more.

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        You’re quite literally paying the same price per core for 8th gen as you were for 7th gen.

    • Bensam123
    • 2 years ago

    Yeah, definitely considering you see gains simply going from 4c to 6c with Ryzen with games that aren’t even optimized for more threads (4c being the lowest common denominator everything is made for now days), it’s not hard to see they’ll be heavily pressed down the line if they don’t increase core counts. The gap will simply widen… much faster as software improves to take advantage of the hardware.

    6c is a pretty strategic position as it’s just over the 4c baseline and not far enough out that it eats away at their extreme processors. That being said, once again software could improve a lot faster here and even 8c may be taken advantage of (although not really so much in current gen titles compared to 6c).

    • tritonus
    • 2 years ago

    No, no. Simple conversion doesn’t work at all, like you suspected (but still you tried). After taxes (and some additional mystical factors), our prices here in Finland are always a bit hefty.

    In this case, you should know the launch prices of Kaby Lake DT-K series here, 9 months ago:
    – i7-7700K €419 (now ~€360)
    – i5-7600K €290 (now ~€240)
    – i3-7350K €220 (now ~€155).

    Comparing the old launch prices with rumored ones doesn’t look too bad. Still keeping the salt shaker handy.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      That’s a very helpful reference to put things into context. Thanks!

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      I was waiting for this post from a Finn to see what the street price was likely to be, thanks.

      Guys, don’t forget that Finnish general tax levels are higher than most places at 24% too; Even with these launch prices, once you deduct the tax to match the weird way everything is sold in the US, it works out like this:

      i3 = €160
      i5 = €240
      i7 = €335

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    Intel: “We’ll give you more coarz, but you’re gonna pay extra for it.”

      • ermo
      • 2 years ago

      Intel: We’ll disable features arbitrarily because we can get away with it, and we’re going to make you pay out your nose to have them reinstated in what amounts to a firmware update. And besides, you can’t have all the features AND and an unlocked multiplier because we have a Xeon brand to protect. Sucks to be you, eh?

      AMD: Here. Have everything and the kitchen sink plus a few extra cores just because. ECC? Sure, it’s there on our HEDT platform, but on our consumer platform it’s not validated by us. Should work though. Please check with your motherboard pusher to verify before you build that whitebox home/lab server. Good luck and have fun!

        • Klimax
        • 2 years ago

        Just small reminder: ECC needs to be validated on each CPU. Mainboard cannot save you from defective ECC circuit in CPU.

        • Laykun
        • 2 years ago

        Intel here again, oh, you got a Z170/Z270 motherboard recently? Yeah, our new processors will fit in those, no, of course they won’t work. Why don’t they work? Oh because we made them work only with the Z370 motherboards of course, our motherboard partners love it! Wait, you’re angry that when you buy a motherboard there’s literally zero upgrade path? What do you mean? Look at the improvements we made between the 6700k and 7700k, it’s massive!

          • psuedonymous
          • 2 years ago

          Oh no, the upgrade path for socket 1151 is identical to socket 1150, 1155, and 1156. Gee, it’s almost as if two-gens-per-socket has been consistent for the better part of a decade. Who could have predicted such a shocking lack of a twist!

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 2 years ago

            Intel’s consistent lack of concern for their customers doesn’t make the complaints less legitimate. Ideally they would hold socket standards as long as it was reasonably feasible.

          • srg86
          • 2 years ago

          err except that the reason here is technical, with Voltage regulator being put back on chip by all accounts.

          This is the downside of the integration of modern CPUs, especially those with iGPU or other methods to try and make them as efficient as possible eclectically, they won’t be pin compatible.

    • techguy
    • 2 years ago

    This happens with every product release. Some foreign retailer jumps the gun and lists prices before the street date and people run around waving their arms in the air in a panic because “the prices are higher!” Then when street date hits the prices are exactly the same as last gen.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Hard to say. I personally doubt that they’ll offer a 6C/6T i5 for the same price as last generation 4C/4T i5. Same for i3 and i7 respectively. Although, if they’re trying to compete against Zen, listing the 8th Gen i3 for the same price as the outgoing 7th Gen i5 doesn’t improve their price/performance curve at all.

        • madseven7
        • 2 years ago

        They won’t. This is Intel we’re talking about. Their prices always go up especially here in Canada. I forget the generation but Intel stated that their soon to be released chip would be $10 cheaper. Instead it was $30 more expensive and the price never came down, only went up.

          • techguy
          • 2 years ago

          Except there is competition on the market now, whereas there was not before. Intel will find it difficult to sell 6-core CPUs for $420 , nearly twice the price of a Ryzen 5 6-core, and even more expensive than some Ryzen 7 8-core models.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 2 years ago

    I’m really curious to know how the 6 core i5 will compare to previous generation 4c8t i7 models. It’s too bad the prices are likely to go up so much. A $300 i5 isn’t very enticing unless it is better than last year’s $300 i7 across the board, and even then, I prefer to stay in the $200 and under range.

      • madseven7
      • 2 years ago

      An i7 7700k is $449 Canadian. Will be$500 +?? That Doesn’t include Motherboard which definitely will be 200+ for one of the cheapest z300 chipsets.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 2 years ago

        $500 CDN puts it roughly between the R7 1700X and 1800X. Seems like a reasonable guess….

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      Better in most tasks. SMT is usually <<50% more performance per core.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      I’m expecting them to hobble the turbo, base clock and/or cache sizes to “equalize” things. Intel will never let consumers win without a fight at the cash register.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    First Equifax now this.

    WTH!

      • Thresher
      • 2 years ago

      Worst day ever.

      • Wirko
      • 2 years ago

      In the era of good enough, the new i3 may actually be good enough for some who have considered buying an i5 before. Ditto with the new i5 and the “old” i7.

      It’s weird though that the i7-8700K is expected to cost much more than the i7-7800X.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        I’d be a little dubious of the prices until they are official.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        I have a feeling Intel knows what configuration/pricing will compete well enough with Ryzen 3/5. If the i3 8350K is really $200 then Intel thinks it’s “close enough” to a Ryzen 5 1500X for $190.

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