G.Skill fires up Trident Z DIMMs at a whopping 4600 MT/s

G.Skill has announced that it's readying up DDR4 memory kits capable of reaching 4600 MT/s transfer rates. The Trident Z Series DDR4-4600MHz kits will include a pair of 8 GB modules with CL19-23-23-43 timings. The company says the modules in the kits are built using hand-picked Samsung B-die integrated circuit components.

The company demonstrated the modules reaching the 4600 MT/s clock at 1.5 V with an Intel Core i7-7740X processor on ASRock's X299 OC Formula motherboard in a dual-channel configuration. G.Skill will offer the modules with the buyer's choice of black or silver aluminum heat spreaders.

The company says the Trident Z Series DDR4-4600MHz kits will be available later this month, but it didn't provide any pricing information. We imagine these hot-clocked modules will demand a healthy premium compared to more run-of-the-mill DDR4 modules, especially given that they are the fastest we have seen to date.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    When I got my pair of G.Skill DDR3-1866 sticks almost 5 years ago I wasn’t so sure about G.Skill. The brands on top of my list were Kingston, Transcend, Apacer (because I’ve grown to trust their products since 2003), Corsair and Crucial. Now it seems G.Skill is still here and they’re very strong. No regrets getting G.Skill.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I don’t have a huge amount of experience with fast RAM, mainly because so many independent tests have proved that once you provide more bandwidth than your CPU can use, it’s a total waste (and that’s around 3000 or 3200 for Kaby Lake).

    Seriously though, what are the chances of your CPU actually managing to boot at this speed? I’ve come across CPUs in the last few months that wouldn’t even run their memory controllers beyond 3000. 4600 just seems like something that only the 1% of the 1% of cherry-picked chips might manage.

      • Firestarter
      • 2 years ago

      Jeff found DDR4-3866 to be measurably faster than DDR4-3000 in Arma III

      [url<]https://techreport.com/review/31179/intel-core-i7-7700k-kaby-lake-cpu-reviewed/11[/url<]

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Perhaps, but where’s the actual limit? I have a feeling from seeing other memory scaling articles for both Skylake and Kaby Lake that the benefits of anything higher than 3200 are pretty minimal.

        It’s a shame Jeff didn’t have time to test more frequencies because it’s really hard to draw anything meaningful from 866MHz increments like that. If you look at skylake scaling articles, different games cap out at all kinds of different speeds, but almost never is there anything meaningful (ie, improved minimum framerates) beyond 3200. One thing we do know is that Kaby is the same architecture as Skylake, just with some extra video deccoder blocks added to the die. One has to assume that memory scaling from Sklake is unchanged, meaning that there’s very little point in RAM faster than 3200 and a lot of the time, the additional cost of 3200 over 3000 is only going to get you 1% or less.

    • bthylafh
    • 2 years ago

    What’s a B-die?

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      [url<]https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/62vp2g/clearing_up_any_samsung_bdie_confusion_eg_on/[/url<]

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        Basically Ryzen is so finicky with RAM, that to get speeds of even 3200MHz you have to use the cream-of-the-crop RAM chips on the market. They’ve determined that Samsung B-Die chips are the best.

        Before all the downvotes start, let’s face it, nobody outside of extreme overclockers had probably even heard/cared what memory chips are on their RAM before Ryzen.

          • Mr Bill
          • 2 years ago

          Disagree, its been a constant thing even from the time of little SDRAM multilegged cockroach chips (72chips to get 2 MB). [url=http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?55697-Tall-Tree-Systems-JRAM-2-memory-error<]Tall Tree Systems JRAM-2[/url<]. I still have two of them. [quote<]Before all the downvotes start, let's face it, nobody outside of extreme overclockers had probably even heard/cared what memory chips are on their RAM before Ryzen.[/quote<]

          • Sahrin
          • 2 years ago

          This opinion is based on pre AGESA 1.0.0.6. All kits are hitting 3200 MHz now.

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            No they’re not. I’m running single-rank G.Skill 3000C15 here with 1.0.0.6, and it won’t boot above 2133 without manual tweaking. With the tweaking, it’s fine, but you definitely can’t just load XMP at 2800+ and be assured everything will work if you’re not running B-die.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 2 years ago

            Are you running 4 modules? Because that’s the only reason why I can see you limited to 2133. You should at least be getting 2667, because that is officially supported on all memory. Plus, the latest bios updates allow a lot more tweaking, albeit you have to set it up manually because it isn’t automatic plug n play.

            I’m running my ram @ 3460. Been thinking about getting a 3200 dual rank 32gb kit when prices drop, since that has been reported to be working now.

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            It’s two modules. 2666 should be easy, but even 2400 isn’t. 1.0.0.6 allows plenty of tweaking and I myself don’t much mind having to use it, but the difficulty curve here is several steps beyond that of CPU overclocking, and AMD can’t count on even their average OCing buyer being able to use those tweaks.

    • wingless
    • 2 years ago

    I really want to see a system that can run it at these speeds. This would be dope with Ryzen. I don’t believe the Ryzen IMC can handle these speeds though 🙁

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      some AM4 boards have external clock generators that can handle speeds > 3200.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 2 years ago

        You can generally get 3600 with good boards/memory, but tests have shown performance peaks @ 3400.

        The price of these high end kits are insane anyway. Not worth it at all. I only bought mine because it was on sale cheaper than some 3200. I’m hoping this drops prices of 3200, so I can get a good 32gb dual rank 3200 kit. Too expensive last I checked, so maybe prices will start coming down now.

          • SHOES
          • 2 years ago

          My 1600x/Gigabyte Gaming 7 are stable at 3400 currently. Doubt it, but it might be possible I can hit 3600 with enough tweaking. The small gains beyond 3400 aren’t really worth my time.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 2 years ago

      Even if it can’t go to 4600 MHz, couldn’t similar performance be eked out with lower frequency and tighter timings?

        • Beahmont
        • 2 years ago

        In Theory. In practice, it’s easier to increase MHz transfer speeds with slightly looser timing, than to tighten timings at the same or lower transfer speeds.

          • Firestarter
          • 2 years ago

          with higher clocks you also get slightly more granularity and the resulting real latency can be just as low or even lower than lower clocked parts with tighter timings

        • DrDominodog51
        • 2 years ago

        DIMMs are either optimized for higher frequency or lower latency.

        The DIMMs designed for frequency tend to be unable to go below certain subtimings no matter how low you set the frequency.

        Likewise, the DIMMs optimized for lower latency are unable to reach as high frequencies as those made for high frequencies.

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