Reminder: iOS 11 will arrive tomorrow

Apple's big phone events get considerably more attention than the company's software-related announcements. It's easy to get excited about big increases in processing performance and graphics capabilities. For some users, though, Apple's commitment to maintaining the software on its devices as they age is an even more compelling reason than hardware for choosing fruit-flavored smartphones and tablets. As a reminder, iOS 11 is set to be released tomorrow for folks using phones all the way back to the iPhone 5s and tablets back to the iPad mini 2, though some older models won't get the full set of new features.

iOS 11 brings a host of improvements that we detailed back when Apple announced the new release back in June. The new OS has multi-tasking features that could make time spent with an iPad Pro more productive, a Finder-like Files application, an updated Photos app, and improvements to the Siri voice assistant. The App Store will see its first serious redesign ever since it appeared on iOS devices, too. The guts of the OS have been upgraded to use version 2 of Apple's Metal graphics API, and there are also new APIs for machine learning and augmented reality.

A list of supported devices follows, but check the bottom of Apple's iOS 11 page for more details, including model-specific limitations. The company also has a support page with information about how to upgrade the software on iOS devices.

iPhone models:

  • iPhone X
  • iPhone 8 and 8 Plus
  • iPhone 7 and 7 Plus
  • iPhone 6s and 6s Plus
  • iPhone 6 and 6 Plus
  • iPhone SE
  • iPhone 5s

iPad models:

  • 12.9-inch iPad Pro 1st generation and 2nd generation
  • 9.9 and 10.5-inch iPad Pro
  • iPad Air 1 & 2
  • iPad 5th generation
  • iPad mini 2, 3, and 4

iPod models:

  • iPod touch 6th generation models
Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Thanks for the heads up.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab

    • LoneWolf15
    • 2 years ago

    I was testing the beta so I got the final a week early.

    Performance is smooth. The new multitask feature is cool. Siri has improved. As much as I like Android, iOS 11 on an iPhone 7 makes it hard to choose anything other than a Pixel on Android.

      • Cuhulin
      • 2 years ago

      I think this is one of the reasons that Apple’s servers don’t have the common update day problems. Many of the people who would want to get the update right away already did so.

      The improvements in IOS on the Ipad made a major difference in functionality this year, so a lot of people may have wanted to get those features earlier – I did, but it’s clear that this was a common approach.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      This is what I don’t get about Android vendors.

      Google’s OS, as per the Nexus devices and now Pixel devices is the best OS out there with timely updates and the best interface.

      All the vendors just screw with this formula and what results is universally a mess, regardless of whether it’s touchwiz, emotionUI, motoblur (thank god that died), sense etc.

      Stock Android is the only Android worth talking about, everything else is junk even if the implementation is okay, simply because of the delays to features/security/bugfixes caused by the vendor bloat and carrier junkware.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Super underrated feature I’m excited for: You can pick a key frame from a live photo to present as the main picture, in full quality, thanks to the horribly pronounced high efficiency format.

    Before the other frames in a live photo were much lower gif-ish quality than the key frame

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      Cool — thanks for the tip!

      I hadn’t heard about that one.

      • tay
      • 2 years ago

      Yes this!!

    • blastdoor
    • 2 years ago

    People used to talk about the iOS-ification of the mac. At least for the iPad, this looks like the other way around

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      but if you spell it Macification, it sounds (phonetically) like someone’s gonna take a morning star to the face.

    • The Egg
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]For some users, though, Apple's commitment to maintaining the software on its devices as they age is an even more compelling reason than hardware for choosing fruit-flavored smartphones and tablets.[/quote<] If I made a list of the top 10 reasons, it would be all of them.

      • brucethemoose
      • 2 years ago

      In my experience, iOS updates slow older phones way down. Not sure if it’s the meager RAM capacities or what, but I do have two IP5’s in the family. One is jailbroken and locked in iOS 6, I think, and is as snappy as ever. Other is up to date, yet was so slow it just had to be replaced.

        • DancinJack
        • 2 years ago

        The iPhone 5 was released five years ago. I think you got your money’s worth.

        edit: spelling

          • brucek2
          • 2 years ago

          Apple has been indeed getting very rich off of consumer acceptance of that belief.

          Personally I question how much longer that acceptance will last. Phones are not inexpensive, they seem to actually be getting more expensive, and they are needed and used by a broad spectrum of society including folks who do not have a lot of disposable income.

          What makes these phones so universally useful is not usually the latest and greatest features – it is the basic functionality that existed all the way back to the very first iphone. Those basic features were usable back then in a way that made people smile. Yet after a few updates, those basic features become all but unusable even though the phone’s hardware has not diminished.

          I know almost no one who replaces their desktop computer every two years, or their laptop. I question why people are OK replacing their phones that fast. I don’t think they will be forever.

            • trackerben
            • 2 years ago

            Some update tracks like iBooks, Notes, and even Maps progressed better than others. Others like Facetime and iCloud/Find iPhone were a whole new level of functionality and justified the OS upgrades that brought them.

            The iPhone 4S/5S/6 series were uplevel-worthy hardware, the 7 series not so much. The iPhone 8 is worth getting for the wireless charging alone, but OIS and environmental hardening done right are really nice.

          • sreams
          • 2 years ago

          Sure… but that is no excuse for Apple degrading the phone’s performance over time. If the latest iOS update is going to noticeably slow an older iPhone down, Apple should stop updating said iPhone, and should instead provide only security updates. At the very least, they should advise owners of older iPhones that the latest iOS update will be detrimental to the usability of their phones. People might actually hold onto their older, great-performing iPhones if they did that…

          oh, I guess that’s why they don’t.

          • flip-mode
          • 2 years ago

          I thought the point he was making is that while it is awesome that Apple supports old devices with OS updates, there comes a point at which one might rather not update the old device with a new OS because updating it slows it down.

          I do not think he was saying anything like he felt he did not get his money’s worth.

            • DancinJack
            • 2 years ago

            So don’t update it?

            • Takeshi7
            • 2 years ago

            There’s no official way to go back to the previous update if you decide the new update slows down your phone.

            • DancinJack
            • 2 years ago

            Like I said, don’t update it.

          • brucethemoose
          • 2 years ago

          It slowed down a little bit with every update.

          Granted, that’s still far better than Android… But just because the bar is on the floor doesn’t mean it [i<]should[/i<] be on the floor.

        • The Egg
        • 2 years ago

        The decrease in speed was likely a hardware-specific limitation (lack of RAM, weak GPU, etc), and doesn’t necessarily mean anything going forward. My 5s work phone for instance (2013, originally iOS7) runs iOS10 just fine, and I’d be surprised if it had an issue with 11.

        By contrast, our Galaxy Rugby Pro’s from the same time period are still stuck on Jelly Bean 4.1.2, and barely qualify as functional.

          • homerdog
          • 2 years ago

          Yea my 5S has not slowed down from updates like other phones I’ve had. My original Galaxy S became useless after I updated to the last supported Android version.

        • soccergenius
        • 2 years ago

        [url=https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/ios-11-on-the-iphone-5s-slower-but-not-quite-slow/<]Arstechnica[/url<] has run some app-launch benchmarks and the performance hit is pretty modest this time. Cold boots are the exception, and Safari tabs do seem to reload more frequently though.

      • bfar
      • 2 years ago

      I’m not keen on Apples’s stuff, but I’ve got to admit they set the bar on the length of time they support stuff. We have an iPad since late 2012 that’s still current because the updates keep coming and the battery is huge. If their phone batteries could keep up they’d actually be worth the premium.

      • strangerguy
      • 2 years ago

      For the same reason, and the fact iPhones keep their resale value the best out of the vendors, makes them the only flagships I’m willing to pay MSRP for.

      The way Android OEMs in general treats their products as disposable that is to be forgotten for the next new hotness 6 months later is acceptable for a <$200 device, but hell not for iPhone-like prices.

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah I wonder what Google is going to pitch that 850 dollar Pixel 2 with…If that still gets 18 months of software support, that’s not a great deal even compared to the 999 dollar X which is funny to say, the latter should get a good 5 years of support.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      It might be 1-9 on my list but #10 would be an honorable mention on how the entire Apple ecosystem gels together. iTunes and App Store and iMessage and Wi-Fi calling on Macs and everything else. It might not “just work” all the time, but it’s a pretty thoughtfully-built attempt at vendor lock-in.

      • psuedonymous
      • 2 years ago

      On the flipside, Apple are quite happy to simply drop support for [i<]others'[/i<] software on their platforms on a whim when it is convenient for them. e.g. [url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-41319675<]32bit apps are no longer supported[/url<] on IOS11, the removal of Carbon, etc.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        All of those things were telegraphed years in advance. If an iOS app hadn’t been updated in two years, it’s abandoned, in Apple’s eyes.

        Carbon is a little tricker but going back to 2007 it was obvious the API was a dead end since it didn’t get 64-bit support. Apple gave five years to redo apps, up until the release of OS X 10.8.x.

        • soccergenius
        • 2 years ago

        [quote=”9to5Mac”<]Apple first started supporting 64-bit applications with the launch of the iPhone 5s in September of 2013. Apple has also required developers to submit new apps with 64-bit support since February 2015 and app updates since June 2015.[/quote<] Apple gave app developers plenty of time to get their apps compatible with 64bit iOS [i<]if the devs actually wanted to[/i<].

    • ikjadoon
    • 2 years ago

    Nice. I wonder how hammered the servers will be.

    FWIW, Apple usually releases the updates at just about 10AM PST / 1PM EST.

    Not gonna lie, I’m thankful these updates come, with BlueBorne. I have an Android, too, which’ll never get patched so that’s one less feature it’ll have now. Welp.

      • LostCat
      • 2 years ago

      srsly. I just got a new Android device and the latest patch is June 26th or something. I wonder if I’ll even get an update by the end of the year.

        • soccergenius
        • 2 years ago

        I know poor OS software update support was par for the course for Android, but I was still surprised to learn that Motorola only commits to 1 major OS update.

        [url=https://m.androidcentral.com/motorola-announces-oreo-updates-moto-z-line-and-moto-g5-models-starting-year<]Regarding miscommunication about Android O for the G4[/url<]: [quote<]It's our general practice for the moto g family to get one major OS upgrade per device, so it wasn't originally planned for Android O.[/quote<] The iPhone 5s will be getting its 4th (and likely last) major update tomorrow.

          • barich
          • 2 years ago

          The Pixel will likely get two major version updates and it has the best updating policy of any Android vendor. I can’t say it’s overly surprising (though unfortunate) that much cheaper devices only get one.

          • LostCat
          • 2 years ago

          With the E4 Plus they haven’t even committed to the one.

      • MOSFET
      • 2 years ago

      Servers don’t appear to be hammered. 2017 iPad just pulled it down over 125Mbps Comcast in 1 minute.

        • LostCat
        • 2 years ago

        I think a lot of people might’ve been on the beta program? I got in on that a bit too early.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I don’t know about that. You got on it and I got on it, but I can’t name anybody I know “IRL” with an iPhone that is running beta software. And I bet if I asked them why, they’d say their phone is too important to them to run prerelease unfinished software on it.

          I think Apple delivers lots of people multi-gigabyte files every day (reinstalling macOS, iTunes movies, etc.) and they just have enough grunt to handle the load.

            • LostCat
            • 2 years ago

            Don’t look at me I only know one person IRL with an iPhone.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      How hammered? Like turning apples into apple sauce.

        • ikjadoon
        • 2 years ago

        Underrated reply

    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    .. okay

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      i wasnt as nearly excited as you are.

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