EVGA Epower V breaks the shackles of stock GPU power delivery

EVGA and its competitors make some fantastic high-end graphics cards with power delivery sections that are both beautiful to behold and incredibly capable. Those sophisticated circuits still aren't enough for some extreme overclockers on the freezing edge of silicon clock rate capabilities, though. EVGA's Epower V standalone VRM board is designed for these people. The Epower V board is designed to deliver two fully-independent voltage outputs that can be adjusted on the fly using the integrated EVGA EVBot MkII controller.

The card takes in juice over three six-pin PCIe power connectors and uses a 12+2 regulator design built from International Rectifier chips to deliver power for a graphics card's core and memory subsystems. The Epower V has a pair of segmented LED displays to show the core and memory voltages in real time. A group of buttons allows control over the EVBot Mk II the old-fashioned way, while a USB Type-C port lets users manipulate the voltage levels through software. Overclockers can also connect a multimeter to the dedicated ProbeIT header for further voltage monitoring.

EVGA says the Epower V can deliver up to 600 A of current at anywhere between 600 mV and 2.0 V to the core circuit of a connected graphics card and up to 80 A at voltage levels from 600 mV to 2.3 V to the card's memory subsystem.

The Epower V is available now from EVGA for $250. The board has a one-year DOA warranty. Those who are interested in how one goes about connecting and using an über-niche piece of equipment like this can read K1NGP1N's tutorial here.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I’m confused:

    [quote<]600 A of current at anywhere between 600 mV and 2.0 V[/quote<] We're talking DC current here, right - so 2.0V @ 600A = 1200W claimed, yet this thing is powered solely by three 75W PCIe power connectors. Is this thing powered by magic instead of electricity, or has someone published the wrong specs?

      • just brew it!
      • 2 years ago

      Maybe the 600A is only at the low end of the voltage range? Still a bit over the design spec of the PCIe connectors, but not crazily so for someone who’s already planning to take a soldering iron to their expensive GPU.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Nah, I already considered that: the low end is 600mV, and 600A x 600MmV is still 360W, which is >225W from three 6-pin connectors.

        I’m sure the overclockers aren’t using cheap PSUs, but that’s still a whopping 60% outside the spec in the best case scenario.

          • just brew it!
          • 2 years ago

          Any of the really beefy enthusiast PSUs ought to be able to handle that; after all, they’re designed to power multiple GPUs. The bigger concern is probably overheating the 6-pin connectors and melting the plastic connector housings. If they used high-quality connectors they’ve probably got more than 60% of safety margin, but yeah they’ll be running out of spec and will probably get noticeably warm.

          Since this product is only for the seriously hard core anyway, stripping off the 6-pin connectors and soldering the PSU’s PCIe leads directly to the regulator card doesn’t seem like it would be a big deal either, if it came to that.

    • DrDominodog51
    • 2 years ago

    Meh. Galax has an epower for ~$90. It has better current capability as well.

    • SuperSpy
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]EVGA says the Epower V can deliver up to 600 A of current at anywhere between 600 mV and 2.0 V to the core circuit of a connected graphics card[/quote<] Anybody else get the shivers from reading that? That's a $#&@-load of current coming off a PCB.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      That’s a peak of 1.2KW (600A at 2V). Yowza. That’s above the power rating for those three PCI-E connectors, isn’t it?

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 2 years ago

        I saw a 1080Ti (iirc) LN2 review where drawing over 1300 watts. It can get much higher.

          • willmore
          • 2 years ago

          Damn…..

      • Misel
      • 2 years ago

      My jaw dropped when I saw this, litteraly. 😮

      • NovusBogus
      • 2 years ago

      Honestly, my first thought was “high power is high but still way less than the AC boards at the day job.” Single digit voltage is for silly residential users; try 20-30A of 230V three-phase. As you might guess, the components and traces are rather a bit larger than what’s on that EVGA board…

    • TwistedKestrel
    • 2 years ago

    Wouldn’t it have made sense to use a detachable wiring harness for this thing? I can think of a lot of reasons why that would have been helpful… although admittedly this thing is definitely for someone else besides me

    • just brew it!
    • 2 years ago

    That’s some major craziness. True “void your warranty” action of a caliber rarely seen these days.

    Any product whose installation instructions include the sentence “Desolder original inductors of each GPU voltage phase with high-power soldering iron.” is waaaay out there.

      • morphine
      • 2 years ago

      I think that EVGA does at least deserve credit for going balls-out. At least it’s a product with a purpose, even if it’s an insane one.

        • smilingcrow
        • 2 years ago

        Not so much balls out as taking a knife to them.
        Maybe they should have called it the EVGA Castrato Max.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      Pffff, they should have just used a rotary tool like I did.

    • Krogoth
    • 2 years ago

    Methinks, this for “GV102” and “GV104” because Nvidia probably unlock the voltage on them to make different from Pascal.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    niche of a niche, eh? I can’t even picture how this would be used.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 2 years ago

      Picture this: [url<]https://xdevs.com/doc/_PC_HW/EVGA/DA0066/eready.jpg[/url<] Ever wanted to take a spool of solder to your GPU? Well here's your excuse.

        • nanoflower
        • 2 years ago

        Sheesh. I would be afraid to power that monstrosity up.

          • DrDominodog51
          • 2 years ago

          Compared to some epowers I’ve seen, that looks very well done.

        • DPete27
        • 2 years ago

        That doesn’t look sketchy at all….

    • NTMBK
    • 2 years ago

    Finally, power circuits beefy enough to handle an overclocked Fermi!

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Dual-Vega cards [b<]CONFIRMED![/b<]

        • dpaus
        • 2 years ago

        <haughty sniff> I’ll wait for the 16-Vega PixelRipper.

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          Behold the PowerBillRipper.

            • brucethemoose
            • 2 years ago

            [url<]https://what-if.xkcd.com/35/[/url<]

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