G.Skill unleashes AMD-ready Trident Z RGB kits up to 3200 MT/s

Debates over whether memory performance is worth messing with have raged in hardware forums for decades. There are arguments to be made on Intel platforms, but on AMD's Ryzen CPUs there's no question: you want fast RAM. That extends to Ryzen Threadripper, too, which still benefits quite a bit from hot-clocked DIMMs. Fortunately, G.Skill is ready to serve. The company just announced a new set of Trident Z RGB kits aimed directly at Ryzen builders, ranging up to 3200 MT/s with a crazy-low CAS latency of 14 cycles.

The kits come in eight-module versions intended for Ryzen Threadripper, two-module variants for Socket AM4 Ryzen processors, and four-module packages that will work in either. The fastest 3200 MT/s tier of Trident Z RGB memory only comes in one-DIMM-per-channel flavor for either CPU, but the 2933 MT/s and 2400 MT/s kits scale all the way up to 64 GB on dual-channel rigs or 128 GB on quad-channel setups. The faster RAM does require a higher-than-standard 1.35 V signaling voltage, but that's the price you pay for performance.

The table above enumerates all the new kits G.Skill will be offering. The company provides a plethora of RAM packages now, so to help users pick out the right product, G.Skill helpfully points out that Trident Z RGB kits meant specifically for AMD processors will have model numbers ending in "X". The company didn't provide us any pricing information for the new RAM, but said it should be available next month.

Comments closed
    • RdVi
    • 2 years ago

    I’m holding out for 16GB dimms to be a bit more affordable and without the performance deficit. I just can’t imagine buying a new system and buy the same capacity of RAM I have already. Hopefully the market has moved in this direction by the time Ryzen 2 comes out.

    • albundy
    • 2 years ago

    whats the point if support is lacking from amd and motherboard makers? might as well save your money and get lower speed. any word on better memory support on AGESA 1.0.0.7?

      • Tirk
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve had my 3200MHz ram running for 4 months now with 14-14-14-34 timings (G.SKILL Flare X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) Model F4-3200C14D-16GFX) on my Ryzen system.

      So support is definitely not lacking if you have a board, Taichi in my case, and memory spec for running at 3200MHz on a Ryzen chip. You’ll be amazed what you can achieve merely by looking at what memory a motherboard has on its support list.

      I think you are perpetuating people merely buying the cheapest ram they can find and expect it to work as hassle free as higher quality ram. Memory issues at Ryzen’s release are not a perpetual problem and certainly haven’t been for some time now.

        • homerdog
        • 2 years ago

        Ryzen still has memory compatibility issues that aren’t present on Intel platforms. The single rank requirement is especially off putting.

          • Tirk
          • 2 years ago

          I freely admit that when you are trying to reach overclocked memory speeds the Ryzen system is more selective of ram that runs overclocked. The single rank is only a “requirement” for memory speeds above the spec for the platform. That is why on mb specs you’ll see the OC(overclock) denoted on any ram speed above 2666.

          Now if you want to buy cheaper ram that is dual ranked it WILL WORK on Ryzen systems just don’t be expecting to run it at OC memory speeds.

          Acknowledging the clearly labeled specification for the platform shows that single rank is not a requirement. Merely taking the short amount of time to look at the motherboards memory compatibility list will solve a lot of headaches that some people are claiming to have.

          • MOSFET
          • 2 years ago

          I’ve had no trouble running 16GBx4 for 64GB of DDR-2400 on Ryzen. Those official charts from AMD are pretty cautionary.

    • freebird
    • 2 years ago

    I’m already running my TridentZ 16GBx4 for 64GB at 2993Mhz with 14-14-14-34 timings with my Ryzen 1700; ever since the P3.00 bios on my AsRock Fata1ty Pro Gaming mobo.

    Model F4-3000C14D-32GTZ

      • Tirk
      • 2 years ago

      The G.SKILL Flare X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) Model F4-3200C14D-16GFX I got worked right off the bat at its rated speed of 3200MHz with 14-14-14-34 timings on my AsRock Taichi and a 1700 as well. Its been issue free for 4 months now.

    • AnotherReader
    • 2 years ago

    When will we get ECC RAM faster than DDR4 2666?

      • Goty
      • 2 years ago

      Could be something to do with JEDEC. Is there an official spec for anything above 2666 w/ECC? Is there ECC memory that doesn’t comply with JEDEC standards?

        • AnotherReader
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah that is the answer. Well, I suppose JEDEC will wait until these speeds can be reached at 1.2 V rather than the non-standard voltages used by high speed kits.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        I think it has more to do with the fact that most server operators are more concerned with DRAM power consumption (it’s already around half a systems’s total depending on configuration), and that RDIMM/LRDIMM register chips are designed to go at standard speeds as cheaply and at as low a power as possible.

        ECC UDIMMs, which Ryzen Pro and TR could actually use, are a pretty tiny market even if it sounds simple in theory to just add a ninth x8 DRAM. I’m not as knowledgeable about DIMM design as I wish I was, but I’m assuming that even unbuffered modules have to deal with clock/control signal fan-out to the individual DRAMs in some way that a 9th chip can’t be just bolted on and expected to work at the same frequencies. There should be JEDEC standards for unbuffered ECC DDR4 up to 3200 MHz, but that doesn’t mean that parts for workable DIMMs actually exist.

          • AnotherReader
          • 2 years ago

          Power consumption is a good point. If I recall correctly, DDR3 went up to 2133 for ECC DIMMs though now I can’t find anything faster than 1866 so maybe a couple of years later, we’ll get DDR4 3200 or better.

      • Krogoth
      • 2 years ago

      What do you even care? ECC memory is build for reliability/data integrity not speed.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        Some people would just like both features? In particular, Ryzen and Threadripper performance can scale ~50% with DDR4 clocks, but being able to have some degree of confidence in memory contents stability is desirable too.

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