HP, Acer, and Lenovo ready low-cost laptops with Windows 10 S

At its Ignite event today, Microsoft placed a lot of emphasis on "firstline" employees, a term it uses to describe the workers that come in direct contact with customers. The company has these people in mind and has designed special packages including a laptop, Windows 10 S and Office 365 F1. HP, Acer, and Lenovo have low-cost machines on the way crafted with the specific purpose of supplying firstline employees, and they'll start at just $275.

HP's Stream 14 Pro will be the first of the "Windows 10 S devices for Microsoft 365 F1" to become available. This 14" ultra-slim laptop is also the cheapest model at $275. HP's specifications for the machine include an unspecified Celeron processor, 4GB of single-channel DDR3L memory, and 64GB of eMMC. The display is a TN panel with a resolution of 1366×768 resolution. The specs aren't impressive, but given that the price includes both Windows 10 S and Office 365 F1, the deal becomes a bit sweeter.

Acer will have two models: the Aspire 1 and Swift 1. The Aspire 1 name isn't new—it's been used quite a bit over the years and refers to Acer's netbook family. We couldn't pull up the exact specifications on that model, but Microsoft describes it as a 14" ultra-slim for $299. Acer's Swift 1, by comparison, is a 13" laptop with a Pentium N4200, 4GB of DDR3L memory, and 64GB of eMMC flash storage. It does sport a 1920×1080 IPS display, which is probably why it costs bit more at $349.

Finally, Lenovo will be offering up a 14" ultra-slim laptop called the V330. It doesn't look like details of this model have hit the web yet either, but Microsoft says it will go for $349 in February of next year. Acer's two machines should be available a little sooner, in Q4 of this year, while HP's Stream 14 should be hitting some time next month.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    What’s the catch with these Windows 10 S machines? Sell the hardware cheap and milk the customer through software license renewal costs? More ads? Less customizability? A photo of Bill Gates during startup?

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Can these still update to Pro like the Surface Laptop?

    • nico1982
    • 2 years ago

    The Swift 1 looks like a quite decent machine at a very good price.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Acer kinda became interesting recently, the Swift 3 and Aspire 5 are some of the cheapest ways into a MX150

    • TravelMug
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]HP's specifications for the machine include an unspecified Celeron processor[/quote<] Reads like a dual-core Braswell based Celeron N3050

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Apollo Lake at least I’d hope, as the direct replacement of Braswell.

    • Yan
    • 2 years ago

    <pedantic>
    If you write “USD”, you don’t need to add “$”: the “D” already means that.
    </pedantic>

      • Neutronbeam
      • 2 years ago

      So it’s duplicatively redundant?

      • djayjp
      • 2 years ago

      The “$xxx” might be in CAD or AUD or…

        • Kraaketaer
        • 2 years ago

        Then you write “US $” or “USD”, “USD $” is literally saying “United States Dollars Dollars”.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I get USD$ from the ATM Machine all the time. I just put my card in and type my PIN number

    • NTMBK
    • 2 years ago

    Landfill fodder. Crap hardware, with no way to upgrade whatsoever, running a crippled OS.

      • Flying Fox
      • 2 years ago

      For those “frontline” workers that only need to run their line-of-business app in “modern” mode, with limited ability to do “more stuff than IT intended”, this is perfect.

      Answer to Chromebook in the education market? It is a start, but not quite. Prices need to touch 199 before it will be viable.

        • ludi
        • 2 years ago

        Bingo. Especially since these are the guys most likely to lose or drop something in an airport. Better that they lose or damage a $300 machine that can be shut off from the cloud anytime, than a $600 machine with half of the company’s confidential technical and marketing documents copied into local storage.

      • UberGerbil
      • 2 years ago

      Upgradable laptops of any sort are becoming a rare breed, a victim to both the fashion for ever-thinner/ever-lighter and the simple reality that there isn’t much impetus to upgrade anymore — by the time most people are bumping into the limits (even storage, with so much on the “cloud”) they’re probably in the market for a completely new machine anyway (especially now that prices for “good-enough” non-gaming machines are well under $1K)

      Meanwhile, plenty of Chromebooks are selling with unarguably crappier hardware, and arguably a more crippled OS.

      These aren’t devices for most of the people who read TR, but the people who read TR aren’t most consumers. These devices may not be for most consumers either, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a niche for them.

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      I’d put money on 95+% of laptops never being upgraded.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 2 years ago

        I’ve found myself adding memory and storage to the laptops that I’ve owned. I’ve also upgraded optical drives for those that had internal bays.

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