Toshiba MG06 hard drives spin up 10 TB for large businesses

We like to "ooh and ah" about the fastest PCIe storage devices around here, but when it comes to capacity, spinning platters probably aren't going away any time soon. Toshiba has announced its latest MG06 7200 RPM hard drives for large business applications. The largest of the MG06 drives is a 10 TB unit that offers a 25% increase in maximum capacity compared to the last generation's largest model. The company says the latest drives also have a faster maximum sequential speed of 237 MB/s and a 25% longer mean time to failure of 2.5 million hours (over 285 years). What hasn't changed is the SATA 6 Gbps interface.

The new drives are also available in 6 TB and 8 TB capacities in addition to the range-topping 10 TB unit. Building off those three capacities, a total of nine different models are available: three with native 4096-bit sectors, three with 512-bit emulation on board, and three more with 512-bit emulation and sanitize instant erase (SIE) capabilities.

All models have a 256 MB buffer. Only the largest model is capable of transfers at up to 237 MB/s—the smaller drives are a little slower at a claimed 230 MB/s. Power consumption ranges from 5.6 W to 7.3 W typical, increasing with drive capacity. The drives have the expected standard 26.1 mm height and fit into standard bays. Toshiba rates the drives to handle 550 TB of transfers per year.

Toshiba says the MG06 line is intended for use in tier 2 business-critical servers with demand for high capacity per spindle, such as capacity-optimized storage, cloud-scale storage, and data archive and backup infrastructure.

According to the company, sample shipments of the MG06 hard drives are available now. The company didn't provide any pricing, but we suspect the MG06 drives to be priced competitively with other 10 TB drives targeted at the same market.

Comments closed
    • Takeshi7
    • 2 years ago

    Does anyone know if these are air or helium?

      • mistme
      • 2 years ago

      No mention of helium in supporting documentation. Looks to be air, similar to HGST Desktar NAS 10TB drive.

        • Takeshi7
        • 2 years ago

        99.9% sure HGST Deskstar NAS 10TB is helium.

          • mistme
          • 2 years ago

          There are HGST Ultrastar He 10-12TB drives and one Deskstar 10TB drive. Helium drives are marked as such.

            • Takeshi7
            • 2 years ago

            Deskstar NAS 10TB is a helium drive. [url<]https://benchlife.info/hgst-deskstar-nas-10tb-review-09212017/[/url<]

    • Growler
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Toshiba MG06 hard drives spin up 10 TB for large businesses[/quote<] What if you have a smaller business? Is the correlation between capacity and number of personnel or between capacity and revenue? How does Toshiba verify that my home office isn't a Google data center?

    • meerkt
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]4096-bit sectors[/quote<] [quote<]512-bit[/quote<] Byte.

    • smilingcrow
    • 2 years ago

    I’m going to hold out for the 11TB version as purportedly the platters have infinite sustain even when the drive is powered off.
    Also if you stream audio tracks via one of these drives the bottom end is tighter and the top end shimmers like a hooker at the end of your bed after you’ve befriended Charlie too frequently.

      • ColeLT1
      • 2 years ago

      Wut

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        It’s a “This is Spinal Tap” reference.

          • ColeLT1
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah, I figured the first sentence, but the 2nd had me ?

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      lol I get the audiophoolery rant but what does it have to do with Charlie?

        • ColeLT1
        • 2 years ago

        Seemed like it was going to be a Spinal Tap reference, but I didn’t get it.

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        It’s a Charlie Sheen reference and means cocaine.

          • smilingcrow
          • 2 years ago

          Using Charlie as a reference to cocaine goes much further back than Mr Sheen’s heyday.

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