Team Group Cardea Zero M.2 SSDs are slim and cool

Most of the talk in the SSD world revolves around names like Crucial and Samsung. Team Group wants to distinguish its offerings from those of the major players, and it's thinking that heat dissipation is the name of the game. Not that long after showing off its Cardea M.2 SSDs with massive heatsinks, the company's now pulling back the curtain on the Cardea Zero M.2 drives, available in 240 GB and 480 GB sizes.

Team Group claims that the surface covering the chips in the Cardea Zero SSDs is made of graphene and copper foil, and should offer "excellent heat dissipation" even if the SSD is an enclosed area. The company claims the combination of materials in the 0.185-mm thick heatsink should let the SSD stay 8% cooler, presumably compared against a bare drive.

Heatsink aside, the Cardea Zero 240 GB drive should be able to hit 2600 MB/s in sequential reads and 1400 MB/s in sequential writes. Random I/O figures are solid, too, at 180K IOPS for random reads and 140K IOPs for random writes. The 480 GB model is faster than its smaller cousin, but not by much. Sequential operation speeds get a 50 MB/s boost, and there are 10K more random write IOPs on tap.

The drives should last for a good long while, too. Team Group says the 240GB Cardea Zero should be good for 335 TB written, while the bigger 480GB unit ought to be able to last through 670TB of writes. The company offers three-year warranty coverage on the Cardea Zero SSDs.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    What happened to the SSD endurance tests TR did when the old gang was still running the site?

    • shaq_mobile
    • 2 years ago

    Is heat a serious concern in these? I guess I’ve never really thought about it or seen it discussed.

      • deruberhanyok
      • 2 years ago

      I don’t know about “serious concern” but recall seeing some drives have performance drops if they get too hot.

      And since motherboard manufacturers like to put m.2 slots under PCIe x16 slots which usually house video cards, sometimes you wind up with not a lot of airflow over them.

      So this could help a little, but if there’s no real airflow I don’t know how much of a difference it would make.

    • homerdog
    • 2 years ago

    What controller does this use?

    • Neutronbeam
    • 2 years ago

    “graphene and copper foil” is pretty cool (so to speak). But since it’s graphene it would be awesomer to say “encased in carbonite.”

    • Flying Fox
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Team Group says the 240GB Cardea Zero should be good for 335 TB written, while the bigger 480GB unit ought to be able to last through 670TB of writes.[/quote<] Can we guess what NAND chips are used here?

      • juzz86
      • 2 years ago

      15nm Toshiba MLC? 🙂

    • Omniman
    • 2 years ago

    I just wish the M.2 standard was a little more standardized. When I bought a device with a M.2 M-key it turned out I needed a M + B key SSD because it didn’t support NVMe. At least the Sata standard all 3 generations would for the most part just work on either of them with the obvious possible performance issues.

      • Clint Torres
      • 2 years ago

      The great thing about standards is there is so many to choose from.

      • davidbowser
      • 2 years ago

      I ran into something similar to this while buying an upgrade laptop ssd. I quickly learned that M.2 drives came in different length cards.

      Some mobo designers actually have multiple different screw headers in case you have the shorter cards. My laptop was not as forgiving.

        • UberGerbil
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]Some mobo designers actually have multiple different screw headers in case you have the shorter cards. [/quote<]Yeah, the Intel NUCs (at least the most recent iterations) are like this. Threw me for a second as I hadn't seen it before.

    • willmore
    • 2 years ago

    Don’t flash chips work better at elevated temperatures? Isn’t this counterproductive?

      • liquidsquid
      • 2 years ago

      They write faster, but forget faster too at higher temps (not that it matters within the life of the device). Spreading the heat will increase the physical longevity of the device. Things like heating and cooling cycles and corrosion. The heating and cooling cycles being a fairly important metric for PCB assembly. If the range isn’t as great due to the heat spreader, the chances of board failure will be much lower.

      • nico1982
      • 2 years ago

      No, the issue is thermal throttling.

        • Goty
        • 2 years ago

        Throttling is an issue with the temperature of the controller (which should be cooled), not the flash itself (which is fine with no cooling).

      • ColeLT1
      • 2 years ago

      It’s the controller (not flash chips) that get hot and bothered (throttled).

        • willmore
        • 2 years ago

        Understood–but they’re hooking all of them togher–thermally.

        Maybe this is a “the controller needs to run cooler and the flash like it hot, so let’s take the heat from the controller and share it with the flash chips” arguement? I’d buy that.

        I assume that the controller tends to run hotter than the flash, so the heat will tend to flow in that direction. Maybe this is a win-win.

        In that case, we can’t call this a heatsink, though.

          • ColeLT1
          • 2 years ago

          Agreed 100%.

          It’s a heat spreader in my eyes.

          • DPete27
          • 2 years ago

          The flash is okay with the heat, but the controller needs to be cooled. However, the controller is very small. Surface area = cooling ability. I think it’s pretty obvious what manufacturers are doing on M.2 drives.

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