In the lab: MSI’s GP62X Leopard Pro gaming notebook

It's not exactly an obsessive-compulsive disorder, but sometimes I just can't resist putting things in a nice, logical pattern. This summer, I spent time with a notebook equipped with Nvidia's GTX 1070, and also with a machine with a GTX 1060 inside. Following that pattern, my next review has to involve the GTX 1050 Ti. To help me maintain my sense of order, the fine folks over at MSI sent over a GP62X Leopard Pro-1045. This gaming notebook features Nvidia's value-oriented GeForce GTX 1050 Ti, and might just hit the sweet spot in the gaming notebook market.

The GP62X is a 15.6" laptop with respectable hardware and a relatively affordable price tag. The machine houses Intel's popular Core i7-770HQ processor—a proven gaming powerhouse—and 16GB of DDR4 RAM. There's a few options for the display depending on the configuration. A model over at Newegg, for example, has a resolution of 1920×1080 and a 120 Hz refresh rate. Although the display on my review unit has a more pedestrian 60 Hz refresh rate, MSI claims that it covers 94% of the NTSC color space.

The GP62X is a bit thinner than some of MSI's other mid-range notebooks, but it's not exactly an ultraportable. It checks in at about 4.8 lbs (2.2 kg), it's 0.9" thick (22 mm) at its thinnest point, and it has fairly wide bezels around its display. The aluminum alloy chassis is attractive, though, as is the brushed-metal cover and the SteelSeries keyboard.

Other features include MSI's Nahimic audio suite and four speakers. Storage duties are handled by a combo setup with a 128 GB SSD and a 1TB hard drive. A single USB Type-C port headlines the notebook's list of connectors, which also includes two USB 3.0 ports, and HDMI output, and an SD card reader.

Newegg and Amazon both sell the GP62X Leopard Pro for $1,299. We'll publish a full review of the notebook soon.

Comments closed
    • gerryg
    • 2 years ago

    BTW, anyone have experience with these Steelseries keyboards? Can you compare with the Lenovo Thinkpad/Ideapad keyboards? I use one of those on my work laptop, and I like the feel of them, in particular the curve of the key surface. I’m not much a fan of the flat keys most vendors use.

    • gerryg
    • 2 years ago

    I haven’t really paid attention to gaming laptops but am just starting to, but something I didn’t see in this article or on Newegg or the vendor site is if the Nvidia card and the built-in display are using G-Sync or not. Just saying it has “120 Hz refresh” doesn’t mean it uses G-Sync. And what about external monitors? Can you use G-Sync with them? Seems important to mention if it does… so I’m guessing it does not. Eric?

    I look forward to AMD gaming laptop entries with Freesync. I expect they will be less expensive and that competition will start to happen. I’d love to have a decent “sweet spot” gaming laptop for under $1000.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]value-oriented[/quote<] See, Acer/Dell/HP all have 1050 or 1050Ti options at $799. It's really hard to justify anything less than a 1060 at $1299, it just feels like you're getting ripped off, and it's not as if the laptop is especially slim, stylish, or made of higher quality materials to justify it. It's just $500 too expensive for no good reason. Admittedly, the Acer VX 15, Dell Inspiron Gaming and HP omen use i5 quads rather than i7s, plus the Dell has a dubious TN screen at the $799 price point - but that is offset by the svelte design and metal body that seems much higher quality than MSI's offering. Where's that $500 going, MSI?

      • ludi
      • 2 years ago

      If you option any of those models to be similar to this, the price difference closes fast. Also, the photo TR published here seems a bit poor on showing off the chassis finish IMO.

      derFunk came up with a much closer comparison.

      One other thing stands out: I’m not in the market for a DTR gaming laptop but if I was, the provision of a real touchpad+button mouse would justify the price over anything with a clickpad.

      • EricBorn
      • 2 years ago

      I’ve also been researching the competition for this notebook. As you say, there are cheaper options (even from MSI, actually) that have a 1050 Ti.

      That being said, I’m not sure where you’re seeing a Dell with a 1050Ti for $799. The Inspiron 15 5000 Gaming series notebooks have a GTX 1050. An Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming notebook with an i7-7700HQ, GTX 1050Ti, and 16GB of RAM has a list price of $1,249. That’s a $50 difference, not a $500 difference.

      Now, I’m absolutely interested in quantifying the differences between those entry-level $799 models and the notebook that’s currently on my desk. But I’ll have to get to that another day.

        • heinsj24
        • 2 years ago

        Dell Outlet $829 New. Granted it comes with 8GB Ram and a hybrid HDD.

        Would be tempting if I didn’t already have a gaming laptop.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    Hard to ignore the fact that for $1299 you can get a GTX 1060 with 6GB of VRAM instead of the 1050 Ti but the same 16GB of memory, i7-7700HQ processor, and 128 + 1TB storage config [url=http://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/dell-laptops/new-inspiron-15-7000-gaming/spd/inspiron-15-7577-laptop/dncwfs618h<]from Dell[/url<]. I don't know that the Inspiron's IPS display covers quite the same gamut as MSI's, but it's not hard to beat the MSI notebook's configuration.

    • Voldenuit
    • 2 years ago

    Clevo called. They want the 1990s back.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      Clevo also called to say that they offer a N850HK1 model which is available for £665 before tax with EXACTLY the same spec (PCSpecialist.co.uk):

      i7 7700 HQ
      15.6″ 1080p IPS display
      4GB 1050Ti
      8GB DDR4
      128GB SSD

      Seriously, even at the current weak £ rates, that’s close to [b<]HALF[/b<] the price of this MSI and the reviews of the Clevo are actually pretty decent.

        • ludi
        • 2 years ago

        That one sells between $1050 and $1250 here when optioned with the SSD+HDD. Cheaper than the MSI but not by as much as a straight currency conversion would suggest.

          • Chrispy_
          • 2 years ago

          Yeah, for some reason Clevo is not competitive in the US. They’re definitely cheaper in both feel and price than the HP/Dell/Acer options which is why they’re (more) popular here in Europe.

          I don’t know why you guys even bother with Clevo unless it’s a super-niche option (like the awesome 11.6″ W110ER was) because they’re insanely-priced for what is supposed to be a low-cost whitebook.

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