Coffee Lake availability check: Core i5s and Core i3s are ready to go

The day after the launch, can you actually buy a Coffee Lake CPU? The short answer is yes. Intel's new silicon is readily available at e-tail, as long as you don't want the range-topping Core i7-8700K. In that case, you may have to hurry up and wait. We've gone traipsing around the top shops to find fine CPUs for you to snag. Here's what we got.

If you haven't read our review, what are you waiting for?

As we mentioned, if you're after that top-tier Core i7-8700K, all we can say is "keep looking." Newegg has a page up for the i7-8700K, but it's already out of stock. Intel's finest isn't even listed on Amazon yet. Stepping out into the wilds of the wider internet, NCIXUS and B&H Photo Video have the chip listed, but it's back-ordered on both sites. Micro Center is selling it, but only in retail locations and at a significant premium for $500. Meanwhile, Best Buy, Wal-Mart, Rakuten, and Fry's lack any listings for Coffee Lake processors at all.

If you don't mind stepping down (or an i7-8700K wasn't in the cards to begin with), Coffee Lake chips become more available as you step down the product stack. Folks desperate for a Core i7-8700 or Core i5-8600K should step on over to B&H Photo Video, as these two models are out of stock at the other retailers. B&H has almost the entire lineup in stock but since it won't be shipping out any CPUs until October 16, so you could better off waiting for Newegg or Amazon to get them in.

Going further down the range, Newegg can set you up with a Core i3-8100, Core i3-8350K, or Core i5-8400 right now. If you have a Micro Center nearby you could stop in to get one there, but the distance caveat likely rules out most of our readers.

If you do end up procuring one of the new processors, you needn't worry about getting a motherboard. Newegg alone lists 47 different boards, and all but one model are in stock at this time. Prices are pretty reasonable, too, seeing as most of the boards are in the $140 to $170 range. The range-topping Aorus Z370 Gaming 7 that we used in our review is just $249, while Asus only wants $190 for the Mini-ITX ROG Strix Z370-I. The cheapest board on offer is MSI's Z370-A Pro at $120. Amusingly, MSI also has the most expensive board on offer in the $500 Z370 Godlike Gaming.

Let us know in the comments if you find a particuarly reliable source for the new chips, or if you pick one up.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 2 years ago

    Wonder when people will start harping on Intel for a paper launch…

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Well you just did.

    • Bensam123
    • 2 years ago

    K series were never available on Newegg, they were a backorder from the moment they were listed.

    The 8700 and the 8400 were available, which is curious though as they operate in smaller power envelopes so they should be able to hit higher speeds. A binning issue would make sense if they were in the same power envelope, but they aren’t. Also a binning issue would mean that the higher series chips wouldn’t be available at all, 8700s were, but 8600ks weren’t. Seems to lend itself to the idea of Intel wanting to make more money in the long run by limiting early adopters to less enticing chips (20% over base speed is pretty meaty).

    People that would normally buy a 8700k and want to pull the trigger at launch would definitely settle for a 8600k (only difference being cache and hyperthreading both of which don’t matter, and clock speeds which we can assume also don’t matter if you’re buying a K series). I know I was going to when I saw the 8700k was out of stock.

      • EzioAs
      • 2 years ago

      [quote<]only difference being cache and hyperthreading both of which don't matter,[/quote<] Since when?!

        • Krogoth
        • 2 years ago

        The overwhelming majority of the desktop users never really cared for HT. It runs into the same conundrum as high-core count chips: extra threads are only useful if your workload takes advantage of it.

        The crux of the problem is that majority of games and desktop-tier application are still single and dual-thread at best despite the fact that quad-core CPUs are quite ubiquitous these days. The extra threads end-up doing little or nothing unless you multi-task or do CPU streaming/number crunching in the background.

        HT ends up being one of the first things that conceded when budget is a concern in a build. It sometimes gets disabled on server-tier and workstation SKUs because it isn’t worth the extra thermal/power consumption and the cost of clockspeed (throttling).

        Neverthless, HT is still extremely useful if you do [b<]need[/b<] to have extra threads and is much better than its Netburst implementation.

    • AMDisDEC
    • 2 years ago

    Great news for AMD!
    Every time Coffee Lake gets mentioned in the press AMD Ryzen and Epyc gets a free mention in the same ad.
    AMD stock is up 90% and this will definitely be an AMD Christmas.

    • Krogoth
    • 2 years ago

    Coffee Lake was rushed to market due to pressure from Ryzen line-up. Intel didn’t take the time to build-up stock so expect highly soughted 8700 and 8700k to be hard to come by until next year. Demand for 4 core SKUs is going to be relatively low since there’s still a flood of Kaby Lake stock in the market.

      • Klimax
      • 2 years ago

      Since when Intel leaves fully upgraded and operational fab sitting idle?

    • ozzuneoj
    • 2 years ago

    RAM prices are making an upgrade seem really unappealing right now.

    I bought 2x8GB of fairly high end DDR3-2133 two years ago for $60.

    Now you’re looking at $120+ for a DDR4-2133 2x8GB DDR4 kit or $145+ for anything 3000 and over.

    That’s $60-$85 more for what would be a comparably lower tier of memory two years later.

    I probably won’t be upgrading until the memory prices come down. An i5 8400 + less expensive Z370 for around $300 isn’t too bad, but shooting up to $450 just to have RAM to get it running is really lame.

    I know it’s an unrealistic thought due to the changes in memory voltage, but it’s too bad none of these chips and boards can handle DDR3 for backward compatibility. I’d probably consider upgrading sooner and keeping my current memory kit until the prices of DDR4 come down.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      I came across [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=118618<]this deal post[/url<] I made a year ago for 16GB DDR4-2800 for $40.....Wish I would've bought, but I had no immediate use at the time.

        • LoneWolf15
        • 2 years ago

        Heck, I found 32GB of DDR3 super cheap, convincing me to keep Devil’s Canyon for awhile. The only DDR4 system I have is the HTPC which is running a low-voltage Kaby i5 (wanted H.265 on the GPU to keep power usage down).

        • ozzuneoj
        • 2 years ago

        Oy… would have been a good time to grab 32GB of DDR4 to save for a rainy day in October… *slaps forehead*

        • MOSFET
        • 2 years ago

        On June 12th, just 4 months ago, I bought from Newegg a G.Skill X370-ready 64GB DDR4-2400 4×16 kit for $435. That’s about what 32GB costs today. And if you’re so inclined, good luck finding any DDR4 unbuffered ECC, anywhere. It won’t be at Newegg, WiredZone, Crucial.com etc…

        Yes – DDR4 purchases look [b<]really[/b<] unattractive right now. Whole Lotta Rosie in all the wrong ways.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      You have a great point that AMD or Intel, RAM and SSD prices aren’t at the best levels right now.

        • Zizy
        • 2 years ago

        And GPUs aren’t either 🙁 The best time to buy a new CPU with great fresh offerings from Intel and still competitive R5 1600… yet every other component is overpriced. Blah.

          • tipoo
          • 2 years ago

          “Intel added cores! I’m going to hit buy on that PCPartPicker bui – oh, crap”.

      • ozzuneoj
      • 2 years ago

      Unless the prices come down, I think the ticket* will be to wait until OEM Coffee Lake systems have been sold for 6-12 months then look for a scratch and dent system to scalp a CPU and memory out of.

      *for cheapskates like me.

      • christos_thski
      • 2 years ago

      I feel the same way, and unfortunately chinese dram and nand manufacturing has still some road ahead to materialize. I don’t think the cartel will lose its stranglehold until something like this happens.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    More trouble for AMD. Yikes.

    • DPete27
    • 2 years ago

    two mATX boards on newegg….

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