Cooler Master MasterBox MB600L fits liquid cooling on the cheap

Besides multi-zoned RGB LED lighting and tempered glass side panels, the biggest trend in PC cases in 2017 has to be flat, featureless front panels. Cooler Master's MasterBox MB600L dips one toe into the slab-faced party while still optionally offering provisions for a single 5.25" drive. The case will arrive in versions with or without the external-facing bay. Available finishes include gunmetal grey, blue, and red trim for buyers with varying degrees of extroversion.

The MB600L is an ATX-sized case made mostly of steel with the power supply sitting in a full-length shroud visible through the acrylic side panel. Builders will be able to fit power supplies as long as 7.1" (18 cm), CPU air coolers as tall as 6.3" (16 cm), and graphics cards as long as 16.1" (40 cm) into the case. Cable management freaks will appreciate the 0.6" to 0.9" of space alloted between the back of the motherboard tray and the steel right panel. The front of the case has a pair of USB 3.0 ports and audio jacks. Digital pack rats can fit up to two 3.5" drives and a 2.5" device in the case, plus whatever M.2 storage is mounted on their motherboard.

Luddites clinging to their optical drives can fit radiators up to 280 mm long in the MB600L. Those who already eschewed physical media can cram 360-mm heat exchangers into the front of the case. Buyers will need to make sure their 360-mm radiator stack is no thicker than 2" (5 cm), though. The only other fan mount in the case is the 120-mm mount cut into the rear panel.

Cooler Master says the MasterBox MB600L is available now, but we weren't able to find it for sale at our favorite e-tailers just yet. The company says the MB600L should go for $50 and includes one 120-mm fan mounted to the rear panel.

Comments closed
    • barich
    • 2 years ago
    • exilon
    • 2 years ago

    This case looks perfect for strangling radiators of air flow.

    Where’s the intake? It can’t seriously be those little strips of mesh on the side. Maybe the bottom?

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      I’d set it up so the radiator is an intake, that way it’s always taking in fresh air from outside the case.

      IMO the way to set this case up is positive pressure with intake fans front, bottom, and rear. The remaining holes will naturally end up being the exhausts, but ofc it’ll be better if there’s a vented top panel because all that hot air will naturally rise.

    • MOSFET
    • 2 years ago

    I also like mATX cases, when not cheaped out like most Rosewills. I have one, a Fractal Design (Arc Mini maybe) and it’s definitely less intrusive under a desk than a full ATX case.

    -supposed to be a reply to tsk and Chrispy

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    I wish there was some more focus on ITX cases. There’s so much wasted space in a modern ATX build that it’s starting to get ridiculous.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      I’m glad it’s not just me.

      • bhtooefr
      • 2 years ago

      Or even small form factor µATX and (it’s hypothetically possible using the 20 liter definition of SFF, although it’d be an extremely tight build) ATX.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 2 years ago

        The [url=http://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=392&area=en<]Sugo SG10[/url<] is 23 liters. That's pretty compact for micro-ATX with a full-size ATX power supply and full-size expansion slots.

          • bhtooefr
          • 2 years ago

          Kimera’s [url=https://kimeraindustries.com/cerberus/<]Cerberus[/url<] is 18 liters, with five slots with support for overlength cards (to support putting a dual-slot card in the bottom slot on µATX), and full ATX power supply support (although with heavy restrictions on CPU cooling - it's much better suited to SFX).

      • rwburnham
      • 2 years ago

      I find it odd that ATX is so popular. Most people only use one or two PCI slots. MicroATX should be the focus, followed by ITX, with ATX being the fringe form factor. I understand that heat is a factor, so extra space can be useful, but there are still far too many ATX cases and motherboards on the market.

        • jihadjoe
        • 2 years ago

        For PCIe I have GPU, soundcard, 10GbE NIC. Storage there’s 10 drives, not counting the SSD for OS. My main rig has always been sort of this configuration for 20 years now. ATX or even EATX is my default.

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 2 years ago

          You realize that is an edge-edge-edge use case though, right? Soundcard is probably < 10%, 10GbE is <1%, 10 drives is probably < 01%.

          • barich
          • 2 years ago

          I have a GPU, 1 SSD, and 1 HDD. I imagine that is a vastly more common configuration.

          I have a small NAS too. I really need to upgrade that, then I can lose the local HDD.

      • ptsant
      • 2 years ago

      It’s not wasted if it permits air flow. It’s also not wasted if it means you can easily route cables, assemble stuff and add a 4th HD down the way. OK, some cases are excessively big. But for tower that sits on the floor, what difference does it make? It’s not like you need an extra room to house your PC…

      • Kretschmer
      • 2 years ago

      I shoved a 1080Ti into a Mini ITX case and would never go back to ATX. It’s nice to get my case off the floor and on top of my desk; finally I can spread my legs out!

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