Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P and MA610P will light up your build

Cooler Master's got another pair of coolers to show off. The MasterAir MA410P and MasterAir MA610P RGB LED tower coolers just appeared on the company's site. The MA410P has four heat pipes and uses a single 120-mm fan, while the meatier MA610P employs two 120-mm fans in a push-pull configuration and has six heatpipes underneath.

Cooler Master MasterAir MA610P

Like most of Cooler Master's better coolers, the heatpipes in new MasterAir units are mashed together tightly to form the base of the unit. Cooler Master refers to the design as "continuous heatpipe direct contact." This is by no means the first time we've seen such a design, but we found it to be effective in the past and we believe the new models will be similarly-efficient when moving heat from a CPU's heatspreader to their fin arrays.

Cooler Master MasterAir MA410P

The MA410P comes with a single MasterFan Pro 120 Air Balance RGB fan, although you could buy another bracket from Cooler Master to mount a second spinner. The cooler is svelte for a 120-mm unit, coming in at 3.3" (8.4 cm) deep with the fan attached. That means that despite its relatively short 6.1" height (15.7 cm), it shouldn't interfere too much with memory slots.

Cooler Master MasterAir MA610P

Meanwhile, the MA610P is considerably beefier. It's more than an inch thicker than its sibling at 4.4" (11.3 cm) in depth and a bit taller at 6.5" (16.7 cm). Some of that extra girth comes from the second MasterFan 120 Air Balance RGB fan and the heatsink's extra two heat pipes. Unlike its smaller brother, the MA610P comes with a logo plate on top with RGB LED accents.

Cooler Master Masterair MA410P

The lighting on both models can be controlled using your motherboard's RGB LED headers, or the included controller or if you don't have such a thing. There are six lighting modes on tap (or seven, if you count "off") as well as variable color and brightness. The MasterAir MA410P is up at Newegg for $50 while the bigger MA610P is going for $70, though currently only overseas third-party sellers have the coolers in stock for a small price premium. We'd expect US stock to show up anytime now. Cooler Master offers two-year warranty coverage on the units.

Comments closed
    • strangerguy
    • 2 years ago

    For $70 asking price, it’s barely cheaper than a 240mm water AIO with similar bling RGBs to boot.

    • Klimax
    • 2 years ago

    Two of them looks quite similar to Zalman’s CNPS12X. (Though just two fans instead of three)

    Might work quite well if my experience with that Zalman is of any indication.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I can’t honestly recommend any cooler that doesn’t use a standard fan. Most heatsinks live through two or three fan lifetimes before they’re so old that they’re no longer compatible with the socket anymore.

    I still have a Thermalright Ultra 120 tower heatsink that’s about 11 years old, though I did have to spend €10 on a socket adapter for 775/115x a few years back.

    My current Noctua NH-U12 feels like it’s been around the block a few times too, and that’s on its second, about to get it’s third fan, having started life on a Core2 Duo.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 2 years ago

      The fans themselves use standard 120-mm mounts. They’re just covered in a shroud on the MA610P.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        Are you sure? The user manual clearly shows otherwise with bespoke fans that use moulded clips.

        Additionally, if you wanted to jury-rig your own 120mm fan on there it looks like you’d have to remove the RGBLED plastic top cap, since it intrudes into the fan frame in both the user manual and the photos on their website.

        MA410P looks solid.
        MA610P deserves criticism for its disposable design, and cheap fan with 40,000 hours lifespan.

        Decent FDB fans have 150,000 hours, and although 40,000 hours is 4 years, that’s under ideal, dust-free conditions which never happens.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Heh, the MA610P’s manual is no clearer than the photos are. I’m reasonably certain those are shrouds that fit over the curiously-shaped MasterAir fans, so you could replace the fans albeit only with Cooler Master’s.

          However, on the MA410P they very clearly are separate clips. You can see it right there on the product page, with the image of the cooler disassembled. You can also see it here in the images we posted.

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      Why the aluminum cooling fins on the base of the MasterAir MA610P?
      [quote<]I can't honestly recommend any cooler that doesn't use a standard fan. Most heatsinks live through two or three fan lifetimes before they're so old that they're no longer compatible with the socket anymore.[/quote<] Agreed

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]Why the aluminum cooling fins on the base of the MasterAir MA610P?[/quote<] Lots of manufacturers have done this. It doesn't really help much unless it's a top-down airflow design like some of the Scythe heatsinks that did this, but I imagine it radiates a small amount of heat to the air and it's a good use of otherwise completely dead space.

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