HP Envy x360 15 brings Ryzen Mobile to the masses

The launch of AMD's Vega-based graphics cards in August was a big deal for the company. The March release of the first wave of Ryzen processors was even more so. Both could be overshadowed in sales figures and importance by Raven Ridge, the APU that brings Ryzen and Vega together. The chip itself seems to have a compelling mix of CPU grunt and advanced graphics capabilities in a competitive 15 W power envelope, but getting design wins has often been a challenge for AMD's mobile offerings. HP has come forward with details about the Raven Ridge-powered version of its popular Envy x360 15 convertible laptop.

HP currently offers several 15" versions of the Envy x360 with Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors with integrated graphics or Nvidia's GeForce MX150 discrete card, as well as a version with AMD's aged FX 9800P APU. The new Ryzen 5 2500U-powered Envy x360 15 comes with a 15.6" 1920×1080 IPS touchscreen and 8 GB of dual-channel DDR4 memory. Buyers should make sure to get the memory configuration they want from the get-go since HP lists the memory slots as "not user-accessible."

Base models get a 1 TB spinning-rust hard drive, but SSDs as large as 512 GB are on the options list. The Ryzen machine has a Thunderbolt 3-enabled USB Type-C connector in its port cluster, and can drive a pair of 3840×2160 displays thanks to that port and an HDMI jack. The laptop also has Intel-powered 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity, a Windows Hello-compatible camera, and a backlit keyboard with a number pad.

The machine tips the scales at 4.8 lbs (2.2 kg) and measures 14.2" wide, 9.8" deep, and 0.9" thick (36 cm x 25 cm x 2 cm). The battery is a three-cell 55.8-Wh unit, though HP didn't make any claims about its life. The display is attached to an extra-flexible hinge that allows the machine to assume tablet and tent shapes.

As a refresher, the 2500U has four cores and eight threads from a single core complex along with eight Radeon Vega compute units. The CPU cores have a base clock of 2.0 GHz, but can boost up to 3.8 GHz in the correct conditions. The eight graphics CUs add up to a total of 512 stream processors clocked at up to 1100 MHz. That SP count is the same as the diminutive Polaris-powered Radeon RX 550, though the discrete card clocks them at up to 1183 MHz and provides memory bandwidth that Ryzen 5 2500U's dual-channel DDR4 controller can only dream of.

The HP Envy x360 15 (model 15m-bq121dx) with a Ryzen 5 2500U, 8 GB of DDR4 memory, and a 1 TB hard drive will go for $699 when it goes on sale later this month. HP backs the machine with a one-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • Arzach95
    • 2 years ago

    I hope that this time there’s an option to expand the memory beyond the 8Gb or that there’s an option to 16Gb installed, something that was really flawed on the AMD FX model , that machine was seriously under powered on purpose by stripping the best features out (memory upgrade capability, M1 SSD capability, GPU shared memory management on BIOS, and Thunderbolt enabled USB-c), the machine had all those features but where intentionally factory disabled, it was a total disappointment.
    At least the USB-C now has Thunderbolt , I hope the other features are also re-enabled. If they do , it could be a great machine.

    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    Did you say Thunderbolt 3?

    I didn’t expect that to appear in non-Intel laptops so soon.

    • msroadkill612
    • 2 years ago

    Others here seem impressed with prices, and HP are not notoriously cheap, so it bodes well for the input cost of the apu.

    • msroadkill612
    • 2 years ago

    The ssd seems a no brainer for laptops, given weight & power consumption, if it wasnt already.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 2 years ago

    Huh, this might be a winner for me.

    Under $1000 (WELL under $1000 actually!), 1080p Screen, N-Trig Active Digitizer ($60 add-on stylus, but that’s fine), 2×2 Intel 802.11ac WiFi / Bluetooth, Dual-channel DDR4.

    This will definitely remain on my short-list, depending on the cost of the SSD-model (and pending 3rd party / Techreport reviews of the CPU / GPU of course). But this might be my new portable device that I’ve been waiting for.

    My current devices in this category were a Dell Venue 8 Pro (Windows Tablet with Active Digitizer) and a Toshiba Kaveri APU (light gaming on the go). If these two devices could be combined cheaply, then I’d be impressed. I historically thought that multiple devices would be easier… but after working with two portable devices… I’m thinking that the “2-in-1” concept makes more sense. Its kind of a hassle to have all your files all over the place.

    An 8-inch tablet though worked in one hand. I can only really imagine using a 15-inch laptop on a writing desk. 5-lbs seems too heavy to hold + write.

      • Alexko
      • 2 years ago

      Hopefully there will be similar devices in a 13″, and maybe 12″ format.

    • ermo
    • 2 years ago

    It just so happens that my SO needs a couple of new laptops for her small business.

    And since she has a thing for HP’s design language and insists on having a numerical keyboard, I think I’m going to suggest she gets this model both for her business and for herself.

    • brucethemoose
    • 2 years ago

    Any plans to review a Ryzen laptop, or are TR waiting for the desktop version?

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      Testing is very important with a 15W product that appears like it would be happy to burn 4x that amount. The difference between theory and reality is likely to be huge.

        • brucethemoose
        • 2 years ago

        That, and low power laptops are really the APU’s niche. It’s kinda hard to justify them in desktops compared to a dGPU + cheaper CPU.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Interested to see how the APUs do against the excellent MX150. If they’re around there, with the CPU performance, that’ll be pretty good for systems like this.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      I’d love to see 15W Intel & MX150 vs “Ryzen Mobile”. (Is that really the name for it?) If AMD was allowed to use 25W in one socket, could it beat 15W & the separate GPU? That seems like a stretch, but integration can bring savings, and every watt counts here.

        • Beahmont
        • 2 years ago

        Integration can bring savings, but I’m skeptical it can bring enough savings to offset the distributed heat locations separate hardware brings and overcome the bandwidth issues integration brings with it to get those savings.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 2 years ago

          Only a test will settle this. Make the silicon suffer!

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    $750 for a 2500U with 8GB, 1080p IPS screen and a 256GB SSD would be great.

    A lightweight 25Watt wonder that can Dota2, Overwatch, Rocket League and possibly more.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      Agreed. I think these prices are pretty reasonable considering the Envy x360 line is one of HP’s top offerings.

        • Spunjji
        • 2 years ago

        That’d be the Spectre x360 – these are the trickle-down cousins, not quite so spectacular but none too shabby either.

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 2 years ago

        Envy is midrange. Spectre is their premium line, and it’s disappointing that Ryzen isn’t launching there yet.

      • Kraaketaer
      • 2 years ago

      What, exactly, about this qualifies as “lightweight”? 2.2kg is decidedly run-of-the-mill for a 15″ device, which means it’s quite heavy (as the average 15″ device has no focus on low weight whatsoever). Get it down to 1.7-1.8kg, and we’d be talking.

      Of course, given the “25Watt wonder” statement, it sounds like you’re making wishes rather than commenting on this laptop – the only one of the three Ryzen Mobile launch models mentioning this was the Acer, IIRC. A ~1.5kg ~13″ convertible with pen input, a 25W 2700U and dual-channel DDR4-2400 or 2666? I’d be all in, and I’d gladly pay the equivalent of $1300 or more for that privilege. Of course, preferably it would have to be a ThinkPad, too. For the build quality and the input devices alone, I’d gladly tack on a few Benjamins more.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 2 years ago

      what I don’t get is why bother with the TB HDD. Just make it $699 with a 128GB SSD (or as you say $750 with 256GB)

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