Grab Ultra HD gameplay with Elgato’s 4K60 Pro capture card

For the last few years, Elgato has been helping gamers get their gameplay out into the world, whether streaming on Twitch or doing a Let's Play-style series on YouTube. The company is best known for its capture cards but has lately been venturing into streaming accessories like green screens and camera adapters. One area that's been hard for gamers to tackle to this point, though, is easily grabbing 4K gameplay footage. Now, Elgato has an answer to that with its new 4K60 Pro internal capture card.

The surprisingly-attractive card is Elgato's first 4K gaming device. At the top end, the 4K60 Pro can handle 4K capture at 60 FPS. That amount of data will chew through 1 GB of disk space per minute at the highest bitrate, though.

Even if you're not capping at full 4K, the card has a lot to offer. Footage captured at 1920×1080 can be recorded at up to 240 FPS, and 2560×1440 footage can obtained at up to 144 FPS. The card can't, however, handle HDR capture or pass-through. Speaking as someone with a 4K television and HDR-capable consoles, this seems like a strange oversight. A card like the 4K60 Pro seems designed for consoles as much as PCs, and HDR content is becoming popular in the console space.

To capture that 4K, 60 FPS content, you'll need to be running Windows 10 with at least a sixth-generation Intel Core i7 CPU or an AMD Ryzen 7 processor, and either a Nvidia GeForce 10-series or an AMD Radeon RX Vega graphics card. Elgato says the 4K60 Pro card will be widely available on November 21, but you can pre-order it through Elgato's website right now for $399.

Comments closed
    • Wirko
    • 2 years ago

    Can it record video with adaptive sync?

    • brucethemoose
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]The card can't, however, handle HDR capture or pass-through. Speaking as someone with a 4K television and HDR-capable consoles, this seems like a strange oversight. A card like the 4K60 Pro seems designed for consoles as much as PCs, and HDR content is becoming popular in the console space.[/quote<] Pascal's hardware encoder supports 10-bit 4K HEVC, but I'm not sure if it's fast enough for 60 FPS. The speed probably depends on the software implementation as well as the encoding settings. On top of that, hardware encoders are notoriously inflexible. If NVenc, say, screws up the HDR metadata due to a bug, there's probably nothing you can do to fix it on your end. As for Vega's encoding block... There's even less documentation than Nvidia :/. But the Vega white paper doesn't mention anything about 10-bit encoding, so it's probably just 8-bit. [url<]https://radeon.com/_downloads/vega-whitepaper-11.6.17.pdf[/url<] In other words, no 4K HDR encoding is totally understandable. It's impossible on any current/near future AMD card, and it's likely finicky and unreliable on Nvidia cards.

      • Laykun
      • 2 years ago

      It’d be interesting to see if it solves some of the annoying problems that shadow play has, for example all videos produced by shadow play have a variable frame rate, which isn’t handled by most of the mainstream pieces of video editing software (I hate having to re-encode my clips with constant frame rate through handbrake just to use them in Adobe Premiere). The lack of separate audio channels for microphone and game audio is also frustrating. These would all be software features though.

        • brucethemoose
        • 2 years ago

        I’m positive NVenc will do CFR recording (as I just re-encoded a video on the GPU using StaxRip), and I’m like 99% sure OBS has an option for that too. Interesting how shadowplay is VFR only, as that’s very poorly supported most places even if it is efficient…

        Recoding and mixing audio is done in software, so it hopefully has an option for that, yeah. Ideally you’d want surround Opus encoding instead of the usual AAC too, since most games output multiple channels over HDMI.

    • cynan
    • 2 years ago

    What is the requirement for a skylake i7 CPU based on? Last I recall, these limitations were for streaming 4K (which was an issue with the hardware codec for which a Kaby Lake was required…).

      • the
      • 2 years ago

      Sky Lake i7’s added an H.265 hardware encoder.

      This hardware encoder is also limited to 8 bit color depths which could also explain the lack of HDR support.

        • brucethemoose
        • 2 years ago

        I doubt it uses the Intel encoder. I don’t even think it’s active with a discrete GPU, but I could be wrong.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 2 years ago

          Can be configured in the motherboard firmware.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This